Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 164

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 164.

Remanent magnetism may be to the key to finding hidden meteorite sites

Adam Hunt | Nov 29, 2021 3:45 AM CST

A crater may disappear long after a meteorite impact, but a new method of finding impact sites despite this has been uncovered.

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Gunther Kletetschka of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute has identified the significantly reduced level of natural remanent magnetization in rock as the key to defining a meteorite impact site. Rocks naturally have 2-3% remanent magnetization, referring to the number of magnetic mineral grains they contain, typically magnetite, hematite, or both. When collecting samples from the Santa Fe Impact Structure in New Mexico (pictured above), Kletetschka found they contained less than 0.1% magnetism.

Kletetschka determined that during a meteorite impact, the plasma created and changes in the electrons within the atoms of the rocks being struck decreased their magnetism. The Santa Fe Impact Structure consists of many shatter cones, which are believed to form only when rock is subjected to high pressure and high-velocity shockwaves, for example, a meteorite impact. Before these telltale shatter cones are uncovered, this discovery allows scientists to identify an impact site that has eroded and become unrecognizable or define the extent of an already identified impact site.

Continue reading: Remanent magnetism may be to the key to finding hidden meteorite sites (full post)

NASA probe breaks two world records, now fastest object ever built

Jak Connor | Nov 29, 2021 2:01 AM CST

NASA's Parker Solar Probe has just completed its 10th pass of the Sun, and during its fly-by, it smashed two world records.

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The NASA probe made an extremely close encounter with the Sun on November 21, 2021, at 4:35 am EST. The probe was just 5.3 million miles away from the surface of our star and passed by at a ridiculous speed of 363,660 mph, making it the fastest artificial object ever created. Additionally, the Parker Solar Probe also broke the record for the closest satellite to survive a near pass of the Sun.

The probe will continue to orbit and increasingly get closer to the Sun, eventually coming within 4.3 million miles from the surface at speeds above 430,000 mph. With each pass, the probe collects valuable data about our star and relays the information back to Earth for scientists to interpret. Information regarding solar wind, and the amount of dust particles in the area are two main sets of data the probe collects. If you are interested in reading more about this story, check out this link here.

Continue reading: NASA probe breaks two world records, now fastest object ever built (full post)

New study drops warning for alien organisms invading, Earth's new era

Jak Connor | Nov 29, 2021 1:31 AM CST

A team of researchers has published a new study in the journal BioScience on November 17, and it details warnings for increasing Earth's biosecurity as the human race accelerates its push into space exploration.

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The paper concentrates on how humans in the past have moved species to new environments only for those species to have a negative effect on the environment, driving out the native species. The researchers believe that humans can do the same thing with planets when we begin visiting them and that alien life on other planets could accidentally be brought back to Earth via astronauts. Humans spreading bacteria from Earth on a planet may cause devastating effects on the planet's evolution. The same way alien bacteria being brought to Earth and potentially becoming harmful to life would cause havoc.

The new study calls for more papers to be written as collaborations between astrobiologists that are hunting for signs of life in the universe as well as invasion biologists that are studying invasive species on Earth. Lead author Anthony Ricciardi, a professor of invasion biology at McGill University in Montreal, said to Live Science, "We can only speculate on what kinds of organisms might be encountered if astrobiologists were to find life. The most plausible life-forms would be microbial and probably resemble bacteria."

Continue reading: New study drops warning for alien organisms invading, Earth's new era (full post)

Jeff Bezos' new village for space tourists isn't what you'd expect

Jak Connor | Nov 29, 2021 1:02 AM CST

If you have booked your tickets to become an astronaut with Blue Origin, you will be staying in Jeff Bezos' Astronaut Village.

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Space tourists flying with Blue Origin will stay in Astronaut Village, located about 15 miles away from the launch site in Van Horn, Texas desert. Passengers will sleep in Airstream trailers, and according to Don DiCostanzo, a business owner who was Star Trek actor William Shatner's wingman told Insider in an interview conducted earlier that the campsite is located down a dirt road that has "tight security". Additionally, Chris Boshuizen, who joined Shatner on his space flight, said that Astronaut Village was a "perfect little campsite."

Future astronauts are given their own Airstream trailer to sleep in, which has had its interior outfitted to look more like a hotel than a camper van. According to Boshuizen, "It's not like a five-star hotel or anything. They have historic artifacts here and there in the different rooms, so you really feel like you're in a place with some connection to past and future". Astronaut Village is also equipped with its own restaurant and bar where future astronauts can enjoy a nice seating arrangement around a fire pit.

Continue reading: Jeff Bezos' new village for space tourists isn't what you'd expect (full post)

Scientists are stumped by these 7 mysteries about our universe

Jak Connor | Nov 29, 2021 12:32 AM CST

Researchers in many fields are yet to fully understand what they are studying, but every day we move closer to uncovering the answers to some of the most difficult questions.

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Outlined in this article are just seven questions that have puzzled researchers for quite some time, and while they are extremely difficult to answer, they aren't impossible. In all of the questions, scientists have a basic understanding of the topic but haven't yet been able to fully answer the entire question.

As time continues and technology advances, it can be assumed that some of these questions will be answered and replaced by others.

Continue reading: Scientists are stumped by these 7 mysteries about our universe (full post)

New data shows galaxies accompanying the Milky Way weren't always here

Adam Hunt | Nov 26, 2021 7:05 AM CST

In a newly released data dump by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia mission, what we thought of as satellite galaxies to the Milky Way are not all they seem.

New data shows galaxies accompanying the Milky Way weren't always here 01

For decades scientists have believed the dwarf galaxies surrounding the Milky Way to be satellites, galaxies orbiting our own that have been doing so for billions of years. However, new data from ESA's Gaia mission has been used to calculate the movements of these galaxies, revealing they aren't orbiting the Milky Way at all.

Researchers computed the three-dimensional velocities for forty dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way, then used them to calculate the galaxy's orbital energies and angular (rotational) momentum. They found the galaxies to be moving significantly faster than other giant stars and star clusters known to orbit the Milky Way. The research team concluded that the dwarf galaxies could not yet be orbiting the Milky Way, as it would have attenuated their orbital energies and angular momentum.

The Milky Way has consumed smaller galaxies in the past, such as the dwarf galaxies Gaia-Enceladus and Sagittarius, 8-10 billion years ago and 4-5 billion years ago, respectively. Stars from both galaxies can be seen in the data from Gaia, where stars absorbed from Sagittarius possess higher orbital energies compared to those from Gaia-Enceladus, indicating their shorter exposure to the Milky Way's influence. The even higher energies of the dwarf galaxies now being studied indicate they have been around the Milky Way for even less time than Sagittarius.

Continue reading: New data shows galaxies accompanying the Milky Way weren't always here (full post)

Russia ejects a cargo ship from the ISS to make way for its new module

Adam Hunt | Nov 26, 2021 6:46 AM CST

The Russian cargo ship "Progress 78" has departed the International Space Station (ISS), freeing up space for the inbound Prichal module.

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Also known as Progress MS-17, Progress 78 launched on June 29th, 2021, to the ISS, delivering over 3,600 pounds (1,630 kilograms) of supplies two days after it launched. Progress 78 undocked from Russia's Nauka science module at 11:22 UTC, November 25th, set on a destructive trajectory into Earth's atmosphere. A new Russian docking port module named Prichal (Russian for "pier") is set to take its place, launching toward the ISS on November 24th.

Prichal's role will be for "testing architecture for potentially permanent settlements in space" according to RussianSpaceWeb.com. Another Progress spacecraft is bringing the Prichal module to the ISS, after which it will undock from Prichal and meet the same fate as Progress 78. Progress 78 was expected to burn up upon re-entry to Earth's atmosphere above the Pacific ocean, roughly four hours following undocking.

Continue reading: Russia ejects a cargo ship from the ISS to make way for its new module (full post)

New research details using gene editing to make stronger antibiotics

Adam Hunt | Nov 26, 2021 5:46 AM CST

New research has been published in Nature Communications, describing how a team of scientists from the University of Manchester used gene editing to manufacture new antibiotics.

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The team used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to create new non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) enzymes, critical in the natural production of antibiotics like penicillin. Previously, manipulating these enzymes to create more potent antibiotics that are less susceptible to growing microbial antibiotic resistance has been a challenge.

The UK government has estimated that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will lead to 700,000 deaths each year globally and predict this will climb to 10 million by 2050, costing the global economy ~$100 trillion.

"The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is one of the biggest threats we face today. The gene-editing approach we developed is a very efficient and rapid way to engineer complex assembly line enzymes that can produce new antibiotic structures with potentially improved properties," said Jason Micklefield, Professor of Chemical Biology at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB).

Continue reading: New research details using gene editing to make stronger antibiotics (full post)

Amazon slashes prices for early Black Friday deal: 25% off microphones

Jak Connor | Nov 26, 2021 4:33 AM CST

Black Friday is around the corner and to lead into the sales madness Amazon has slashed prices across a select range of microphones.

Amazon slashes prices for early Black Friday deal: 25% off microphones 01

A good quality microphone is a staple part of any streaming setup, and while you can take a cheaper microphone and tweak it to sound like a higher-end microphone, sometimes it's just better to pick up a reputable brand of microphone that you know is going to be acceptable quality.

Blue Microphones certainly comes to mind when the topic of high-quality microphones is brought up and Amazon has discounted a large range of its microphone solutions by up to 25%. Amazon's early Black Friday deals feature discounts for popular Blue products such as the Blue Yeti, Blue Yeti X, Blue Yeti Nano, and Blue Snowball iCE. In the entirety of this article you will find the best deals for Blue's range of on sale products.

Continue reading: Amazon slashes prices for early Black Friday deal: 25% off microphones (full post)

100,000 year old Mammoth Tusk found, sparks 'Jurassic Park' moment

Jak Connor | Nov 26, 2021 4:02 AM CST

A team of researchers has stumbled across a mammoth tusk deep beneath the ocean surface, which is perfect for preserving fossils.

100,000 year old Mammoth Tusk found, sparks 'Jurassic Park' moment 01

A team of researchers from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute was exploring an underwater mountain off the coast of California back in 2019 when they discovered what looks like a wood log. 10,000 feet below the surface, the research team found a 3-foot mammoth tusk fossil that had been preserved by the cold temperatures of the deep sea, much like how food is preserved by being frozen.

Researchers suspect that the tusk was from a large Columbian mammoth that was likely a creature that came from crossbreeding a woolly mammoth and another species of mammoth. As for the exact age of the creature, researchers are working on analyzing the radioisotopes, which can be indicators for finding out an approximation of how old a specimen is. ScienceAlert reports that the mammoth tusk is "much more than 100,000 years old."

Continue reading: 100,000 year old Mammoth Tusk found, sparks 'Jurassic Park' moment (full post)

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