Drones News - Page 5

The latest and most important Drones news - Page 5.

Intel working towards drones that won't even require human control

Michael Hatamoto | Sat, May 16 2015 1:20 PM CDT

Drone technology is advancing rapidly, and it may not be too much longer when humans will no longer need to directly control them, according to Intel.

Intel working towards drones that won't even require human control | TweakTown.com

During the Intel Future Showcase in the UK, Intel and Ascending Technologies showed off a drone that uses six Intel RealSense Cameras - that power the drone so it can fly by itself. Using the onboard cameras, a drone can create a real-time 360-degree map of the world, supporting depth and distance analyzing functionality. The idea of a self-navigating drone might be frightening to some, but appears to be a small glimpse of the future.

"Ultimately it will make for a safer and more useful robot... it can avoid people for example, so we can be less likely the drone will run into someone and cause harm," said Scott Dwyer, product and marketing manager at Intel, in a statement published by BT.

Continue reading: Intel working towards drones that won't even require human control (full post)

Safran and Valeo show autonomous vehicles can learn from drones

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Mar 27 2015 11:55 PM CDT

Valeo, a well-known French automotive parts manufacturer, is utilizing technology from defense contractor Safran, in an effort to provide self-driving vehicle software technology by 2020. Valeo wants to provide carmakers with applications in the next three years, as autonomous vehicles are on the horizon.

Safran and Valeo show autonomous vehicles can learn from drones | TweakTown.com

Both companies fitted a Volkswagen CC for a live demonstration, and the vehicle was equipped with radar, lidar and camera systems - able to adapt to slow-moving and stopped vehicles, live traffic lights, and posted speed limits.

"We realized very quickly that we had much more in common than we'd expected," said Guillaume Devauchelle, innovation chief for Valeo, in a statement to Reuters. "It turns out than an autonomous vehicle is really a terrestrial drone."

Continue reading: Safran and Valeo show autonomous vehicles can learn from drones (full post)

Drones are being enjoyed by Hollywood, filming unique shots

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Mar 27 2015 1:55 PM CDT

Drones are being embraced by Hollywood directors, as the small unmanned aircraft are able to capture photographs and video footage from unique angles. Drones also are being tasked with live news footage, as they can be rapidly deployed and are relatively inexpensive.

Drones are being enjoyed by Hollywood, filming unique shots | TweakTown.com

However, there is some concern related to drone safety due to the ease in which drones can be utilized - experience isn't really a necessity before flying a drone. It can become even more dangerous on a film set, which tend to be high-pressure and fast-moving.

"Whenever you have a tool at your disposal that allows you to tell the story more efficiently and more poignantly, you use it," said Pieter Jan Brugge, executive producer of "Bosch," in a statement published by the Wall Street Journal. "The shot tells the story."

Continue reading: Drones are being enjoyed by Hollywood, filming unique shots (full post)

3D Robotics releases DroneKit open source API for app development

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Mar 27 2015 4:20 AM CDT

3D Robotics has released the DroneKit API for drone app development, and the free open software can be used for drone apps or onboard drone software.

3D Robotics releases DroneKit open source API for app development | TweakTown.com

The purpose of releasing the API for the community is so those interested in drones are able to customize how they use them in the field. DroneKit allows for waypoint flight paths, drones can follow GPS targets, view playbacks and log analysis of flights, and other advantages currently unavailable.

"Unlike other APIs for drones, there are no levels of access to DroneKit; it's completely flexible and open," said Brandon Basso, VP of software engineering for 3DR. "The platform works on laptops as well as mobile devices. Best of all, once an app is created, the app automatically works on any computing platform - the interface is always the same."

Continue reading: 3D Robotics releases DroneKit open source API for app development (full post)

Secret Service plans to test drone flights in Washington, D.C

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Feb 27 2015 6:30 PM CST

Earlier in the week, the US Secret Service said it will conduct drone exercises near the White House and throughout the Washington, D.C. area. The tests are expected over the next few weeks, but times, dates and locations for the exercises weren't made available.

Secret Service plans to test drone flights in Washington, D.C | TweakTown.com

Ironically, it's a decision that comes weeks after a drunk federal employee crashed his drone on White House property. Although it was ultimately a harmless incident, it revealed a potential threat with more drones taking to the skies.

The Secret Service didn't offer very many details and only offered this statement:

"The United States Secret Service, in conjunction with other inter-agency partners, will conduct a series of exercises involving unmanned aircraft systems, in the coming days and weeks.

Continue reading: Secret Service plans to test drone flights in Washington, D.C (full post)

Future wars will likely heavily rely on drones, robots

Michael Hatamoto | Wed, Feb 25 2015 6:30 AM CST

The use of drones and robotics will be more prevalent in future warfare, providing a great technological edge to a few leading nations. The US and UK might be most recognized as drone leaders, but there are almost 90 different countries using military robotics.

Future wars will likely heavily rely on drones, robots | TweakTown.com

When the US began military operations in Iraq more than 10 years ago, there were only a small number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) available. However, there are now more than 7,000 drones, including aircraft, helicopters, and unmanned ships and other sea-based craft - and the US military wants to purchase even more options.

The use of drones also allows for military strikes against targets too dangerous or remote for fighter pilots and ground troops. Faster development of artificial intelligence has some experts worried if robotics and drones may become too smart for mankind's good.

Continue reading: Future wars will likely heavily rely on drones, robots (full post)

US sources say Ukrainian forces face drones, electronics jamming

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Jan 30 2015 3:54 PM CST

Ukrainian forces are overwhelmed by drones and electronic jamming from pro-Russian separatists, as electronic warfare shows how devastating it can be on the battlefield. Ukrainian soldiers lack proper training and equipment to stop continued artillery strikes, and cannot communicate with one another due to radio signals being jammed.

US sources say Ukrainian forces face drones, electronics jamming | TweakTown.com

"It is very difficult for Ukrainian forces to be able to operate on radios, telephones and other non-secure means of communications because their opponents have such an exceptional amount of jamming capability," said Lieutenant General Ben Hodges, commander of US Army Europe, in a statement to reporters. "Even if you can acquire where mortar or rockets are coming from, to be able to do something about it is very difficult if you can't communicate."

In addition to electronic warfare, pro-Russian fighters are using drones to conduct surveillance operations - collecting intelligence on Ukrainian military defenses and locations. The drones likely originated from the Russian government, and have become vital in coordinated artillery and mortar strikes against Ukrainian soldiers.

Continue reading: US sources say Ukrainian forces face drones, electronics jamming (full post)

Super Bowl will be a 'no drone zone' on Sunday for the big game

Michael Hatamoto | Fri, Jan 30 2015 10:16 AM CST

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a new statement verifying the Super Bowl is a "no drone zone," and anyone caught flying a drone near the stadium faces potential criminal charges. There is a mix between security and safety concerns and copyright regarding filming sporting events, so drone operators should avoid the potential headache.

Super Bowl will be a 'no drone zone' on Sunday for the big game | TweakTown.com

"The FAA bars unauthorized aircraft - including drones - from flying over or near NFL regular- and post-season football games," according to a statement from the FAA. "The same restriction applies to NCAA college games in stadiums seating 30,000 or more fans, Major League Baseball games and many NASCAR events."

The FAA is struggling to create private and commercial drone flight laws, as the number of unmanned aircraft continues to rise in the United States. However, the FAA is straightforward when it comes to the Super Bowl and other major sporting events: "If you want to see video of the Big Game, watch it on TV. Leave your drone at home."

Continue reading: Super Bowl will be a 'no drone zone' on Sunday for the big game (full post)

Malware infection could cause drones to drop from the sky

Michael Hatamoto | Thu, Jan 29 2015 10:14 AM CST

Small drones being flown by recreational hobbyists can be hijacked using malware, as a security expert found a backdoor in the Parrot AR drone. The AR quadcopter helicopter drone can be controlled by a smartphone, tablet, NVIDIA Shield and similar devices, but can be hijacked with the Maldrone malware.

Security specialist Rahul Sasi was able to infect the drone and could interfere with its navigation features. Once compromised, he could issue a kill command, or fly the drone under his command - opening the odor to potential invasion of privacy cases, or stealing an onboard camera/video recorder.

"In this we would show infecting a drone with Maldrone and expecting a reverse tcp connection from drone," according to researchers. "Once connection is established we can interact with the software as well as drivers/sensors of the drone directly. There is an existing AR drone piloting program. Our backdoors kills the autopilot and takes control. The backdoor is persistent across resets."

Continue reading: Malware infection could cause drones to drop from the sky (full post)

Dutch engineering student develops a flying ambulance drone

Chris Smith | Tue, Jan 27 2015 5:28 AM CST

With the ability to fly up to 61 mph, track emergency calls using a GPS for navigation and reach a patient within 12 square km in under 60 seconds - this drone is set to greatly increase cardiac-related survival rates for members of the public.

Dutch engineering student develops a flying ambulance drone 096 | TweakTown.com

Once the drone arrives at the scene, an operator can observe, speak with and instruct any willing helper how to operate the devices located on-board. Still not impressive enough? As according to their official Facebook page, a 125 mph model is currently being worked on, achieved through more power and decreased drag.

Complete with the on-board camera, GPS capabilities and speaker system, this drone is set to carry a defibrillator, allowing passers-by to attempt a heart restart of any cardiac victim that may need this drones life-saving service.

Continue reading: Dutch engineering student develops a flying ambulance drone (full post)

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