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A new coronavirus COVID-19 symptom has been found, here's what it is

Jak Connor | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 9, 2020 at 02:10 am CDT

By now, you have most likely heard what the coronavirus symptoms are, but everyday new knowledge is discovered about how the virus works, and sometimes more symptoms are discovered.

A new coronavirus COVID-19 symptom has been found, here's what it is 01 | TweakTown.com

The French National Union of Dermatologists-Venereologists (SNDV) organization has posted some recent findings that indicate that skin-related pigmentation is a common symptom throughout coronavirus patients. These types of pigmentation include pseudo-frostbite, hives, and persistent redness, according to Le Figaro. The doctors also noticed that the red spots on the skin can be quite painful for patients as well.

The SNDV organization recently posted a press release, stating "Analysis of the many cases reported to SNDV shows that these manifestations can be associated" with COVID-19, and that "We are alerting the public and the medical profession in order to detect these potentially contagious patients as quickly as possible". Every day we are learning more about coronavirus cases, and since this new symptom has now been added to screening lists, be sure to contact a health professional in the event of you experiencing it.

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Coronavirus COVID-19 'game-changer' drug is here, and it's working

Jak Connor | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 9, 2020 at 01:31 am CDT

Scientists globally are currently scrambling to create a vaccine for the coronavirus, but until everyone receives a dose, researchers are looking for ways to cure the virus and ultimately stop the spread.

Coronavirus COVID-19 'game-changer' drug is here, and it's working 01 | TweakTown.com

Realistically, a vaccine for the coronavirus is most likely going to be around 18 months away, which means a way to stop the spread, and cure already infected patients need to be developed. Doctors and researchers have what has been called a "game-changer" drug, and it's not new either, it's been around for quite some time. This new cure stems from coronavirus patients who have entirely recovered from the disease; doctors are using their blood and redistributing it out to new patients.

Inside the blood of a cured coronavirus patient are antibodies that have battled the coronavirus and succeeded. Doctors are hoping these antibodies can be shared with new patients, which will then result in the disease being cured, or at least the recovery time shortened considerably. This process is called a blood plasma donation, and at the moment, doctors have already treated more than 20 patients at Mount Sinai's School of Medicine.

Continue reading 'Coronavirus COVID-19 'game-changer' drug is here, and it's working' (full post)

This new coronavirus COVID-19 symptom is confusing many doctors

Jak Connor | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 9, 2020 at 01:03 am CDT

In most severe cases of coronavirus COVID-19 patients' lungs are hit hard by the virus, and most of the time result in the patient developing pneumonia.

This new coronavirus COVID-19 symptom is confusing many doctors 01 | TweakTown.com

In an effort to get ahead of pneumonia being developed, healthcare professionals scan the lungs to see if the patient will require breath assistance with a ventilator. In a significant number of coronavirus cases, doctors also notice that patients have low oxygen levels. This symptom is why doctors examine the lungs to see if pneumonia is developing, but recent research has added a new level of confusion.

Some patients who have been admitted to hospital and have been recorded down for having low oxygen levels have shown no signs of breathing impairment via their lungs. Dr. Todd Bull, director for the Center of Lungs and Breathing at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, says, "A whole bunch of these patients really have low oxygen, but their lungs don't look all that bad." So how can this be happening?

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Scientists pinpoint which coronavirus COVID-19 symptoms lead to death

Jak Connor | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 9, 2020 at 12:32 am CDT

Scientists around the world are rushing to make a cure for the now rampant coronavirus, but until that cure is created, regulated, and distributed out the public many more people will unfortunately die. But what symptoms are leading to deaths?

Scientists pinpoint which coronavirus COVID-19 symptoms lead to death 01 | TweakTown.com

A new study has been published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The researchers behind the study examined the health records of 85 coronavirus patients who died in Wuhan, China. The scientists examined each of the patient's medical histories, level of exposure to the Coriolanus, coronavirus laboratory results, CT readings, and finally, the treatment each of the patients undertook while in hospital.

The researchers made some discoveries that could allow future healthcare workers to be able to pinpoint which coronavirus cases could result in fatalities, thus saving lives for future and current cases. The study's results indicate that the highest numbers of fatalities occurred in males over 50 years of age that also had other chronic diseases. The most common diseases that were found in males who died from coronavirus were hypertension, diabetes, and coronary heart disease.

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Here is the COVID-19 coronavirus Achilles heel, says experts

Anthony Garreffa | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 8, 2020 at 08:44 pm CDT

The world is scrambling to find the magic bullet for COVID-19 coronavirus, and it seems that researchers may have just found what they're describing as the Achilles heel of COVID-19 coronavirus.

Here is the COVID-19 coronavirus Achilles heel, says experts 06 | TweakTown.com

In a statement from Scripps Research, researchers said that they have found a specific portion of COVID-19 that could be targeted with vaccines after the team mapped a human antibody's interaction with SARS-CoV-2 at "near-atomic-scale resolution". The antibody itself was secured from a SARS patient from many years ago, but it also reacts to SARS-CoV-2.

Dr. Ian Wilson, the study's lead author, said in a statement: "The knowledge of conserved sites like this can aid in structure-based design of vaccines and therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2, and these would also protect against other coronaviruses-including those that may emerge in the future".

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US gov classifying all coronavirus deaths as COVID-19 deaths

Anthony Garreffa | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 8, 2020 at 08:18 pm CDT

The US government is classifying the deaths of any and all patients with coronavirus, as COVID-19 deaths -- no matter the underlying health conditions that killed them.

US gov classifying all coronavirus deaths as COVID-19 deaths 05 | TweakTown.com

The news is coming directly from Dr. Deborah Brix, the response coordinator for the White House coronavirus task force. She said that the federal government is still counting suspected COVID-19 deaths, even though nations around the world are doing the opposite of this.

Dr. Brix said during a Tuesday news briefing at the White House: "There are other countries that if you had a pre-existing condition, and let's say the virus caused you to go to the ICU [intensive care unit] and then have a heart or kidney problem. Some countries are recording that as a heart issue or a kidney issue and not a COVID-19 death".

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This is our first look at Wuhan, China after coronavirus lockdown lift

Anthony Garreffa | Business, Financial & Legal | Apr 8, 2020 at 08:01 pm CDT

Can you believe Wuhan, China has been under extreme lockdown for 76 days -- the largest lockdown in human history. But now, the people of Wuhan are enjoying a post-lockdown lifestyle... for now.

This is our first look at Wuhan, China after coronavirus lockdown lift 04 | TweakTown.com

Wuhan has re-opened its highway tolls, flights and train services are leaving the city -- and to make it more personal, I'm based in Australia and we just had a flight from Wuhan land at the Sydney Airport. As for Wuhan residents, they are free to travel throughout China as long as they are not infected with COVID-19.

Jia Shengzhi, a delivery driver in Wuhan, told the BBC: "During the past two months, almost no-one was on the streets. It made me feel sad. We sometimes received phone calls from customers asking for help such as sending medicines to their ageing parents".

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South Korea: electronic wristbands to enforce COVID-19 quarantine

Anthony Garreffa | Science, Space & Robotics | Apr 8, 2020 at 07:26 pm CDT

The South Korean government looks to be taking the spread of COVID-19 a little more seriously, and a little more painful to citizens, as it considers the use of an electronic wristband to enforce quarantine measures across the country.

South Korea: electronic wristbands to enforce COVID-19 quarantine 03 | TweakTown.com

Yoon Tae-ho, the Director General for Public Health Policy at the Ministry of Health and Welfare, explained the electronic wristbands being used to stop the spread of COVID-19 coronavirus. He said: "Most of those who are in quarantine are following protocols well but there have been some violations. We will come up with the most efficient measure after further discussions".

But South Korean residents shouldn't fear electronic wristbands just yet, as he added that the South Korean government is well aware of the negative connotations that come using electronic wristbands -- and to add, a government forcing that on its citizens is very Orwellian.

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Sony confirms PlayStation 5 DualSense controller has a headphone jack

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Apr 8, 2020 at 06:58 pm CDT

Yesterday Sony announced the PlayStation 5's official next-gen controller, the DualSense. But the released images didn't show a critical feature gamers were curious about: The included AUX headphone jack. Luckily Sony has swooped in to make clarifications.

Yes, the PS5's new DualSense controller will have a headphone jack. All of your old headsets should still be compatible with the PS5's audio output function. "[The DualSense] still has an audio jack so you can plug in your own headsets like DualShock 4,"PlayStation product manager Toshimasa Aoki said on Twitter.

This inclusion makes sense. The PS5 is built around carrying its legacy forward and won't leave PS4 gamers behind: Not only will the PS5 support PS4 games, but it'll also support current-gen peripherals like headsets, DualShock 4 controllers, and the PlayStation VR headset.

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How to sign up to Stadia's free two month trial

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Apr 8, 2020 at 06:08 pm CDT

To help keep people at home (and to hopefully get money from forgotten subs), Google is giving away a free two month trial to Stadia Pro. But it's not all that easy to sign up.

How to sign up to Stadia's free two month trial 865 | TweakTown.com

Google just announced a free Stadia subscription offer in a recent blog post. There's just one problem: The post leaves out how you actually sign up for the trial. Going to the Stadia.com website only gives you an option to either buy the $129 Founder's Edition, or to sign up using an invite code.

To actually sign up and get your free trial you have to download the Stadia app to your phone. You'll have to do this anyway because Stadia is locked behind the app (yes, it's annoying). Click on the free trial button, tie your Google account to Stadia, and enter some credit card info. Be mindful of the date because Google will charge you $10 a month in June if you forget.

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