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Basic income doesn't reduce work ethic, leads to better-suited jobs

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 5:30 AM CST

The new research comes from Leiden University, which received a grant from the Netherlands Trade Union Convention (FNV).

Basic income doesn't reduce work ethic, leads to better-suited jobs 01 | TweakTown.com

Following a series of behavioral experiments simulating three different forms of social security, the researchers concluded that basic income would not necessarily mean that people would work less. The researchers also found indications that individuals with a basic income are more likely to find a job that is better suited to them.

"In the condition without social security, the test participants didn't receive a basic sum. In the benefits condition they received a basic sum, which they lost as soon as they started working. In the basic income condition they received the same basic sum but didn't lose this when they started work," said social psychologist Erik de Kwaadsteniet.

Continue reading: Basic income doesn't reduce work ethic, leads to better-suited jobs (full post)

Growing Starlink constellation could affect future space observations

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 5:00 AM CST

A new study on the satellites' impact has been published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Growing Starlink constellation could affect future space observations 01 | TweakTown.com

Astronomers are concerned about the effect that SpaceX's Starlink satellite constellation could have on their scientific observations as the constellation grows in size. Currently standing at almost 1,800 satellites orbiting at an altitude of roughly 550 kilometers (341 miles), SpaceX plans to expand the constellation to 10,000 satellites by 2027.

A team of researchers analyzed archival images taken by the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), operating out of Caltech's Palomar Observatory, which scans the entirety of the night sky every two days, cataloging changes. In images taken between November 2019 and September 2021, researchers identified 5,301 satellite streaks. They are most apparent during twilight observations taken at dawn or dusk, the most critical time in finding near-Earth asteroids.

Continue reading: Growing Starlink constellation could affect future space observations (full post)

555.55-carat black diamond from space up for auction, can use crypto

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 4:30 AM CST

The rare 555.55-carat black diamond is dubbed "The Enigma" and is believed to have originated in outer space.

555.55-carat black diamond from space up for auction, can use crypto 01 | TweakTown.com

The auction house Sotheby's Dubai will be auctioning off the 55-faceted diamond in London in February. It expects the diamond will be sold for at least 5 million British pounds ($6.8 million), and they intend to accept cryptocurrency as a possible payment.

Black diamonds are also known as carbonado and are found naturally only in Brazil and Central Africa. Their origin is unknown, and six different hypotheses have been proposed, two of which refer to cosmic origins. They may have formed inside a giant star that then became a supernova, flinging the material toward Earth. They may also have come from asteroids, either directly or due to a collision with another interstellar object.

Continue reading: 555.55-carat black diamond from space up for auction, can use crypto (full post)

UK Government: Earth could see '4°C warming by 2100'

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 4:00 AM CST

The projection comes as part of the Third UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA3) submitted to the UK Parliament.

UK Government: Earth could see '4°C warming by 2100' 01 | TweakTown.com

The CCRA3 is required by the Climate Change Act 2008 and is partly based on an independent Technical Report produced by a team of over 600 researchers, led by the University of Exeter and Met Office. The Technical Report concludes that global warming increases risks to the UK's natural environment, human health, communities, infrastructure, businesses, security, migration, and supply chains.

"One of the key conclusions from the University of Exeter's work was that current worldwide policies could result in up to 4°C warming by 2100. The agreements made at the COP26 climate summit in November have reduced the likelihood of this, but it remains possible," said Professor Richard Betts MBE, who led the team.

Continue reading: UK Government: Earth could see '4°C warming by 2100' (full post)

Massive genome sequencing project of all known species' begins

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 3:30 AM CST

The work is headed by the Earth BioGenome Project (EBP), with a new paper describing its goals, next steps, and current achievements being published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

Massive genome sequencing project of all known species' begins 01 | TweakTown.com

After launching in November 2018, the EBP is moving from its initial pilot projects to full-scale production sequencing. The goal of the EBP is to catalog complete DNA sequences for all 1.8 million named plant, animal, fungi species, and single-celled eukaryotes.

The project networks other efforts to sequence the DNA of life on Earth from other nations worldwide, such as the California Conservation Genome Project (U.S.), Darwin Tree of Life Project (Great Britain and Ireland), the Vertebrate Genome Project, and the 10,000 Bird Genomes Project. With the Earth forecasted to lose half of its biodiversity by the end of the century if nothing is done to stop climate change, the project serves to archive life on Earth as we know it and help protect our ecosystems and help prevent biodiversity loss.

Continue reading: Massive genome sequencing project of all known species' begins (full post)

Tonga estimates damage after devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 3:05 AM CST

On January 15, an underwater volcano several miles off the coast of Tonga erupted, causing the islands to be blanked in toxic volcanic ash.

Tonga estimates damage after devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami 02 | TweakTown.com

An underwater volcano located 40 miles north of the capital of Tonga erupted, causing a massive plume of toxic smoke to be shot up into the atmosphere, reaching an altitude of 12 miles. The eruption immediately spawned a four-foot tsunami that hit the capital of Tonga. Additionally, the eruption knocked out most means of communications with the outside world as an underwater cable has been severed, which may take a week to restore.

Australia and New Zealand have sent surveillance flights over to Tonga to assess the damage, and reports indicate that there isn't mass causalities but significant damage to houses and resorts. On top of the physical damage from the tsunami, volcanic ash is blanketing the region and contaminating drinking water. Most residents aren't aware that the ash is toxic, which poses as a major health concern for many, said Tonga's deputy head of mission in Australia, Curtis Tu'ihalangingie.

Continue reading: Tonga estimates damage after devastating volcanic eruption and tsunami (full post)

Unknown objects at the heart of Milky Way are sending Earth signals

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 2:35 AM CST

A team of researchers detected radio signals coming from the center of the Milky Way, and then they mysteriously disappeared.

Unknown objects at the heart of Milky Way are sending Earth signals 01 | TweakTown.com

The ASKAP radio telescope located in Australia performed a survey that included 2 million objects, and each of the objects was being classified by a computer and researchers. One object, in particular, wasn't able to be classified by the computer or researchers and became an immediate object of interest as, throughout 2020, the object emitted six radio signals over the course of nine months. The researchers hadn't seen anything like this before.

Scientists attempted to locate the object that was causing the radio signals in infrared, visible, and X-ray wavelengths but were unable to spot anything. Additionally, the object stopped emitting signals for months on end, and then researchers re-detected it around a year after it was first discovered. While the signals aren't officially classified as anything yet, researchers are using the placeholder name "galactic center radio transients" (GCRTs).

Continue reading: Unknown objects at the heart of Milky Way are sending Earth signals (full post)

Drones blamed for attack on oil tankers that has killed three people

Jak Connor | Drones | Tue, Jan 18 2022 2:02 AM CST

Early reports from police suggest that drones were used to attack oil tankers resulting in explosions that have killed three people and injured a few others.

Drones blamed for attack on oil tankers that has killed three people 02 | TweakTown.com

A report from The Guardian indicates that drones may have been used by Houthi forces in Yemen to attack three oil tankers that were located close to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) airport. The attack was claimed by the Houthi forces, and UAE police have acknowledged and reported the incident, stating that the explosions were likely caused by small flying objects.

The attacks and the quick claim by the Houthi forces is likely to increase the tensions between UAE and Houthi. The apparent drone attacks have killed three people, two Indian nationals and one Pakistani. Additionally, six people have been injured, but most are reportedly suffering minor damage. The Guardian reports that the Houthi have been using drones equipped with bombs to attack the UAE over the duration of the war.

Continue reading: Drones blamed for attack on oil tankers that has killed three people (full post)

Scientists say Earth's core may be cooling faster than they thought

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 1:31 AM CST

Researchers have discovered that Earth's core may be cooling much faster than previously anticipated after performing interesting tests on bridgmanite.

Scientists say Earth's core may be cooling faster than they thought 03 | TweakTown.com

A team of scientists from Carnegie and ETH Zurich decided to perform an experiment on bridgmanite, a miner that is found in large quantities at the boundary between Earth's outer core and its lower mantle. The researchers used a diamond anvil cell and combined it with bridgmanite samples. The diamond anvil cell was then placed in front of a laser to simulate the high pressure and temperature found at the boundary region and then observed the cooling process with an optical absorption system.

The results from the experiment indicated that bridgmanite was much better at conducting heat than previously thought, in fact, it was 1.5 times better. Due to higher heat conductivity, a higher rate of cooling takes place, which means that Earth's core will cool down faster than what was previously estimated. Additionally, once bridgmanite cools, it turns into a mineral dubbed post-perovskite, which as Interesting Engineering reports, "conducts heat at an even faster rate".

Continue reading: Scientists say Earth's core may be cooling faster than they thought (full post)

NASA rover discovers carbon on Mars that may be biologically produced

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Tue, Jan 18 2022 1:02 AM CST

NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired data that indicates the recently discovered carbon may have been biologically produced.

NASA rover discovers carbon on Mars that may be biologically produced 01 | TweakTown.com

Continue reading: NASA rover discovers carbon on Mars that may be biologically produced (full post)

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