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Battlefield 2042 developer says young boys should be force castrated

Anthony Garreffa | Gaming | Thu, Dec 2 2021 6:45 PM CST

Battlefield 2042 sucks... like, really bad -- so bad that Battlefield insider Tom Henderson says 70% of the player base is gone already from its launch just a week or two ago now.

Battlefield 2042 developer says young boys should be force castrated 07 | TweakTown.com

But in other news: a 9-year veteran at DICE, Marie Bustgaard Granlund, two weeks before the launch of Battlefield 2042 retweeted a quote from a communist comedian, Stephen Szczerba, supporting the castration of young boys. Szczerba tweeted out in support of castrating young boys, and the 9-year DICE veteran and Battlefield 2042 producer... agrees, vehemently.

The tweet that Granlund retweeted reads: "Stop abortion at the source. Vasectomies are reversible. Make every young man have one. When he's deemed financially and emotionally fit to be a father it will be reversed. What's that? Did the idea of regulating a man's body make you uncomfortable? Then mind your fucking business".

Continue reading: Battlefield 2042 developer says young boys should be force castrated (full post)

Battlefield 2042 tanks hard: player base down 70% since launch

Anthony Garreffa | Gaming | Thu, Dec 2 2021 6:27 PM CST

If you've played Battlefield 2042 then you would've realized it's just... really not that great, at all. So the news from Battlefield insider Tom Henderson that the Battlefield 2042 player base has dropped, hard.

Henderson tweeted that the Battlefield 2042 "player base has dropped 70% since launch, in addition to its stock also dropping 18% since early access. Both players and investors are not happy with this game". We don't have any firm numbers to confirm this, because a 70% drop would mean the Battlefield 2042 servers would be empty.

But even tweet replies to Henderson's claims that 70% of the Battlefield 2042 player base has run away aren't all negative, with some tweets noting: "Well I'm happy. Game is great, loving it. Genuinely" and another that tweeted: "70% ?! On what platform? Just Steam or across the board. Seems like if 70% of people stopped playing, we wouldn't be finding matches as quickly. Not seeing this on PS5 anyway".

Continue reading: Battlefield 2042 tanks hard: player base down 70% since launch (full post)

Sperm used by scientists as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic

Anthony Garreffa | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Dec 2 2021 6:11 PM CST

I've written over 25,000 articles in over 11 years at TweakTown, and never... never did I think I'd write the headline "Sperm used by scientists as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic". But hey, here we are... using fish cum as an alternative to plastic. Righty-o.

Sperm used by scientists as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic 02 | TweakTown.com

Anyway, a team of Chinese scientists has created a new raw, squishy material known as "hydrogel" because hydrogel sounds way better than "salmon semen" or "fish cum". The scientists used two small strands of DNA from the sperm of salmon -- yeah, fish cum -- and then combined them with vegetable oil that binds them together, creating hydrogel.

The gel is then molded into different shapes, freeze-dried in order to remove moisture, and already the scientists have turned it into cum cups, I mean plastic cups made from semen-based materials. Because I want my lips around a fish cum-based plastic, instead of real plastic, because I care about the environment that much. Uh, yuck.

Continue reading: Sperm used by scientists as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic (full post)

Titanfall boss Vince Zampella takes over Battlefield franchise for EA

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Thu, Dec 2 2021 5:07 PM CST

EA's rockstar Vince Zampella now leads the Battlefield franchise amid a big internal shake-up at the company.

Titanfall boss Vince Zampella takes over Battlefield franchise for EA 24 | TweakTown.com

Big things are happening with the Battlefield universe. EA announced that Respawn Entertainment head Vince Zampella has taken over the Battlefield series and will guide the IP into the future with a multitude of new games.

Halo co-creator Marcus Lehto will also help expand the Battlefield universe. In October, EA opened a new Seattle-based studio and hired Lehto to lead the team. Now Lehto confirms his new studio is working on Battlefield.

Continue reading: Titanfall boss Vince Zampella takes over Battlefield franchise for EA (full post)

Could CES 2022 be impacted from changed US entry requirements?

Rob Squires | Business, Financial & Legal | Thu, Dec 2 2021 2:26 PM CST

With the possible upcoming changes to the guidelines for entering into the United States happening over the next few days, everyone has been quite silent about the possible impact on next month's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. It has been announced that US President Joe Biden will unveil a new federally based strategy to address COVID-19 this winter on Thursday. The President has said the new strategy will be focused "not with shutdowns or lockdowns, but with more widespread vaccinations, boosters, testing and more."

Could CES 2022 be impacted from changed US entry requirements? 1 | TweakTown.com

It has been reported over the last few days that top US government officials have been considering requiring everyone who enters the United States to be tested for COVID-19 the day before their flight, as well as being tested again after arrival, regardless of vaccination status. Although no official changes have been announced yet, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed in a statement that the agency is working to revise testing requirements for travelers because of the new Omicron variant.

"A revised order would shorten the timeline for required testing for all international air travelers to one day before departure to the United States," a CDC spokesman said in a statement. "This strengthens already robust protocols in place for international travel, including requirements for foreign travelers to be fully vaccinated." As the rules stand as of now, vaccinated travelers are required to test three days before their departures. The change under consideration would shorten that timeline to one day prior to a departure to the United States.

Continue reading: Could CES 2022 be impacted from changed US entry requirements? (full post)

Solving the Lasker food paradox to show how ocean life eats and lives

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Dec 2 2021 7:32 AM CST

At the 181st Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Kelly Benoit-Bird will discuss how sonar or active acoustics can identify biological hotspots in ocean life, revealing the answer to the food paradox in the sea.

Solving the Lasker food paradox to show how ocean life eats and lives 01 | TweakTown.com

Using active acoustics, researchers could analyze returning echoes from sound pulses to find small activity hotspots throughout the ocean. Conventional sampling often misses these, giving rise to the Lasker food paradox proposed in the 1970s, which found that laboratory animals fed the average concentration of ocean food did not survive, despite their ocean-dwelling counterparts doing fine.

"We're using systems much like those used to find the depth of the ocean, but instead of interpreting echoes from the seafloor, we're using more sensitive systems that allow us to map layers of life in the water. What we've found is that animals of all different sizes, from millimeter-long plankton to large predators, are unevenly distributed, and this variation is really important to how life in the ocean functions," said Benoit-Bird.

The presence of concentrated pockets of ocean food and biota, varying by depth and location, suggests animals must find and capitalize on aggregated resources to survive. Higher concentrations of resources reduce the energy they must expend continuously hunting for a steady supply of food.

Continue reading: Solving the Lasker food paradox to show how ocean life eats and lives (full post)

Volcanic layers beneath the moon's surface revealed in radar data

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Dec 2 2021 7:17 AM CST

Using radar data from China's Chang'e 3 mission in 2013, researchers are learning more about the stratified layers of the lunar surface.

Volcanic layers beneath the moon's surface revealed in radar data 01 | TweakTown.com

Volcanic activity on the moon has deposited lava rock on its surface throughout its history. With time, these rocks break down into dust and soil, called regolith, from space weathering and asteroid impacts. Layers of this material have been buried beneath the lunar surface over time as this cycle repeats.

"Using careful data processing, we found interesting new evidence that this buried layer, called paleoregolith, may be much thicker than previously expected. These layers have been undisturbed since their formation and could be important records for determining early asteroid impact and volcanic history of the moon," said Tieyuan Zhu, assistant professor of geophysics at Penn State.

Researchers identified from the first direct ground radar measurements made by the Chang'e 3 mission a layer of paleoregolith roughly 16 to 30 feet (4.8 to 9.1 meters) thick, between two layers of lava rock thought to be 2.3 and 3.6 billion years old. Scientists say this suggests that the paleoregolith formed significantly faster than the previous estimate of 6.5 feet (1.8 meters) per billion years.

Continue reading: Volcanic layers beneath the moon's surface revealed in radar data (full post)

NASA-funded institute wants to help protect astronauts in spaceflight

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Dec 2 2021 7:02 AM CST

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) at Baylor College of Medicine, along with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), is seeking scientific proposals to counteract wear and tear on astronauts during spaceflight.

NASA-funded institute wants to help protect astronauts in spaceflight 01 | TweakTown.com

The NASA-funded Institute's Biomedical Research Advances for Space Health (BRASH) solicitation is investing in science to protect astronauts on future Artemis missions and more. Deep space exploration presents astronauts with many physiological stressors, such as increased radiation exposure and gravity changes, and psychological stressors from isolation, confinement, and the inherent danger in such an environment.

Consequently, astronaut health is impacted as tissues degrade, DNA is damaged, and more. The BRASH solicitation aims to reduce risks to crew member health through supporting the development of disruptive technologies, therapies, or novel approaches to enhancing pre-existing internal cellular repair functions, improving the body's endogenous repair and maintenance systems.

Continue reading: NASA-funded institute wants to help protect astronauts in spaceflight (full post)

New type of binary star finally observed, confirms theories

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Dec 2 2021 6:32 AM CST

Long after it was theorized to exist, a new class of stars has been discovered by astronomers.

New type of binary star finally observed, confirms theories 01 | TweakTown.com

Using the Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory in California and data from multiple astronomical surveys, researchers from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian made this discovery.

"We have observed the first physical proof of a new population of transitional binary stars. This is exciting; it's a missing evolutionary link in binary star formation models that we've been looking for," says Kareem El-Badry, the postdoctoral fellow responsible for the discovery.

When a star dies, it will almost always become a typical white dwarf but may rarely become an extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarf. Standard stellar evolution calculations would take the mass of such a star and conclude that it must be older than itself, so these stars cannot have come to be on their own after burning away their fuel. Therefore, astronomers theorized ELM white dwarfs must result from an interaction with another star in a binary pair, which would siphon mass from it faster than it would lose otherwise.

Continue reading: New type of binary star finally observed, confirms theories (full post)

Mark Zuckerberg's Meta is investing $10 billion into the Metaverse

Jak Connor | Business, Financial & Legal | Thu, Dec 2 2021 4:02 AM CST

Mark Zuckerberg has sat down with Vayner Media CEO Gary Vaynerchuk on November 12, 2021, to discuss the next platform shift called the Metaverse or Web 3.0.

Zuckerberg is at the helm of what was formerly called Facebook, and is now Meta, and explains why he thinks the Metaverse is the next big thing on the technological advancement horizon. Zuckerberg explains that, simply put, the Metaverse is a combination between augmented reality and virtual reality. "Virtual reality" can be easily defined as being in an entirely digital world that you can interact in, and "augmented reality" is the virtual world projected onto the world that we see today.

The head of Meta says that the company is investing $10 billion dollars into the future of the Metaverse and that money will be going towards connecting people via this new digital experience. Zuckerberg recounts the timeline of the internet, with its beginning primarily being text-based to its transition to mobile phones with cameras and the shift in focus images. Zuckerberg says that video format is primarily how we share social experiences and that the Metaverse will be what's next.

Continue reading: Mark Zuckerberg's Meta is investing $10 billion into the Metaverse (full post)

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