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Officials plead that these rare carnivorous penis plants aren't picked

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 5:45 AM CDT

Officials have shared images on Facebook of three women posing with the strangely shaped plants and have asked the public to refrain from picking them.

Officials plead that these rare carnivorous penis plants aren't picked 01 | TweakTown.com

The Cambodian Ministry of Environment has asked the public to stop picking the rare plant species, writing in its Facebook post that what the three women in the included images are doing is "wrong", "and please don't do it again in the future!". LiveScience spoke to Jeremy Holden, a freelance wildlife photographer and the discoverer of the Nepenthes holdenii plant species, and Francois Mey, a botanical illustrator.

The two informed the publication that despite numerous reports of the plant in the photos being Nepenthes holdenii, it was more closely related to Nepenthes bokorensis, which is more widely found across southwest Cambodia. These Nepenthes plants survive by producing nectar that attracts insects that climb inside of the plant and become trapped in digestive fluids.

Continue reading: Officials plead that these rare carnivorous penis plants aren't picked (full post)

Head of NASA declares China is 'good at stealing' its space tech

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 5:25 AM CDT

NASA Administrator Bill Nelson spoke at a recent House Appropriations Committee hearing about space-related matters.

The hearing addressed the $26 billion budget request by U.S. President Biden to be allocated to NASA for the 2023 fiscal year, more than has ever been allocated to NASA. During the hearing, Nelson said he believes NASA is "in a space race with China" and that "they've done some impressive stuff," according to this series of tweets quoting Nelson.

However, he followed this up by saying, "yes, they are good at stealing," after citing their rover on Mars and their Tianhe space station. Nelson believes that cybersecurity needs to be taken more seriously in the government and private sector, likely to prevent their technologies from being used by others.

Continue reading: Head of NASA declares China is 'good at stealing' its space tech (full post)

Huge nuclear fusion breakthrough doubles fuel usage, increasing output

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 5:04 AM CDT

A study on the fusion fuel breakthrough titled "First-Principles Density Limit Scaling in Tokamaks Based on Edge Turbulent Transport and Implications for ITER" has been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Huge nuclear fusion breakthrough doubles fuel usage, increasing output 01 | TweakTown.com

Physicists from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, or EPFL) have updated one of the foundational laws governing nuclear fusion research since 1988, the Greenwald limit, named after Martin Greenwald. They have shown that much more hydrogen fuel can safely be used in fusion reactors.

Nuclear fusion (the process of fusing two atomic nuclei, typically of hydrogen, and releasing large amounts of energy) experiments are conducted within reactors called tokamaks. The tokamak is designed to contain the plasma created from the fusion fuel, in this case, hydrogen atoms, which is heated to about ten times the temperature of the sun's core.

Continue reading: Huge nuclear fusion breakthrough doubles fuel usage, increasing output (full post)

Heaviest commercial satellite ever will launch on SpaceX Falcon Heavy

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 4:43 AM CDT

New estimations show that the upcoming Jupiter-3 geostationary communications satellite will be the heaviest commercial geostationary satellite ever launched.

Heaviest commercial satellite ever will launch on SpaceX Falcon Heavy 01 | TweakTown.com

Jupiter-3, also known as Echostar 24, is being built by Maxar Technologies for Hughes Network Systems, a subsidiary of EchoStar. The satellite was scheduled to launch at the end of 2022, after initially being planned to launch mid-way through the year, but delays to several Maxar spacecraft, including Jupiter-3, mean that it is now likely to launch in early 2023.

"This delay is due in part to relocation of critical resources at Maxar to a higher priority government-related spacecraft project," said Pradman Kaul, president of Hughes Networks Systems.

Continue reading: Heaviest commercial satellite ever will launch on SpaceX Falcon Heavy (full post)

'Night-time solar' breakthrough makes power in the dark from infrared

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 4:22 AM CDT

A study on the night-time solar development titled "Thermoradiative Power Conversion from HgCdtTe Photodiodes and Their Current-Voltage Characteristics" has been published in the journal ACS Photonics.

'Night-time solar' breakthrough makes power in the dark from infrared 01 | TweakTown.com

Researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) managed to generate electricity using the energy from heat radiated as infrared light. The device used to generate power is called a thermoradiative diode, a semiconductor device made from materials used in night-vision goggles. Stanford University researchers were able generate electricity with solar panels last month with similar methods.

"Using thermal imaging cameras you can see how much radiation there is at night, but just in the infrared rather than the visible wavelengths. What we have done is make a device that can generate electrical power from the emission of infrared thermal radiation," the researchers wrote.

Continue reading: 'Night-time solar' breakthrough makes power in the dark from infrared (full post)

NASA provides expected time of death for its dying Mars Lander

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 4:01 AM CDT

The end of operations for NASA's InSight (short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Mars lander is due at the end of this year as it continues to lose power.

NASA provides expected time of death for its dying Mars Lander 02 | TweakTown.com

InSight on April 24, 2022, the 1,211th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Since landing on Mars on November 26th, 2018, to measure seismic activity, InSight has remained powered by a pair of solar panels, each measuring about 7 feet (2.2 meters) wide. Its primary science mission was to be achieved within a year on Mars (almost two years on Earth) and having completed it, NASA has extended its mission.

Continue reading: NASA provides expected time of death for its dying Mars Lander (full post)

Netflix loses 200,000 subscribers then lays off 100+ employees

Jak Connor | TV, Movies & Home Theatre | Wed, May 18 2022 2:47 AM CDT

A new report from CNBC has revealed that Netflix plans to cut over a 100 employees from its company, with most of the staffers being located in the US.

Netflix loses 200,000 subscribers then lays off 100+ employees 01 | TweakTown.com

According to a Netflix representative that spoke with CNBC, as a result of Netflix's slowing revenue growth, the company has been forced to reduce our cost growth, which has translated into 150 staffers being let go. Netflix's 150-employee cull represents just 2% of the company's 11,000 employees, with the majority of the cut staffers being US-based.

The representative explained that the decision to fire staff had been driven by "business needs rather than individual performance," and for that reason, it makes it especially difficult to "say goodbye to such great colleagues. We're working hard to support them through this very difficult transition". These staff reductions are hardly surprising considering the fall of Netflix's stock price following its forecast for future losses in the coming quarter.

Continue reading: Netflix loses 200,000 subscribers then lays off 100+ employees (full post)

Twitter followers have been audited and the results seem fake

Jak Connor | Social Networking | Wed, May 18 2022 2:04 AM CDT

In the wake of Elon Musk's announcement that he wants to find out how many fake accounts are on Twitter's platform, an audit has been done on a very influential Twitter account.

Twitter followers have been audited and the results seem fake 01 | TweakTown.com

In a new report from Newsweek, an audit conducted by software company SparkToro found that nearly half of President Joe Biden's Twitter followers, which is currently at 22.2 million, are fake accounts. Notably, the software company found that 49.3% of accounts following Biden's "@POTUS" Twitter account were "fake followers". SparkToro defines a "fake follower" as "accounts that are unreachable and will not see the account's tweets (either because they're spam, bots, propaganda, etc. or because they're no longer active on Twitter)."

Twitter has estimated in its last 11 quarterly reports that approximately 5% of users are spam/fake accounts, which Musk has now thrown into question following several recent tweets where Musk has proposed new ways to estimate the number of bot accounts, and asked the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) to get involved. Furthermore, SparkToro found that 70.2% of Musk's 93.3 million Twitter followers are fake accounts.

Continue reading: Twitter followers have been audited and the results seem fake (full post)

Elon Musk wants the SEC to figure out how many bots are on Twitter

Jak Connor | Social Networking | Wed, May 18 2022 1:20 AM CDT

Elon Musk is attempting to figure out how many Twitter users are bots and how many are authentic users.

The SpaceX and Tesla CEO recently stated that the deal to purchase Twitter was temporarily put on hold while an investigation was conducted into how many fake, spam, illegal, or duplicate accounts are on Twitter. According to Twitter's latest numbers, the social media platform estimates that below 5% of Twitter's total accounts are bots, and if that number is found to be inaccurate, it may impact the $44 billion price tag in a way that Musk gets a discount.

Musk recently took to his Twitter account to publicly say that Twitter claims >95% of daily active users are real, unique humans. The Tesla CEO then asked his followers if anyone has that experience. Musk followed up by replying to a journalist that stated the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) should investigate Twitter's numbers to see if the company lied on its official filing with the regulatory body. Musk jokingly prodded the SEC by writing the below tweet.

Continue reading: Elon Musk wants the SEC to figure out how many bots are on Twitter (full post)

Elon Musk now under investigation, broken rules saved him $143 million

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Wed, May 18 2022 12:46 AM CDT

Elon Musk has had bouts with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in the past, and now he may be about to enter into the ring with them again following Musk's acquisition of Twitter.

Elon Musk now under investigation, broken rules saved him $143 million 01 | TweakTown.com

In 2013 the SEC ruled that Twitter and other social media platforms are viable ways for publicly traded companies to disclose information that can affect share prices. In 2018, Elon Musk tweeted that he had "funding secured" to take Tesla private, which caused Tesla's share price to skyrocket. The SEC went after Musk for his tweets which eventuated in Musk paying a $20 million fine, giving up his position as chairman of Tesla, and having information about Tesla pre-approved by colleagues at the company before publishing.

Now, an investor who has purchased more than 5% of a company's stock is forced to disclose their position within 10 days of the purchase. This SEC rule is put into place so other investors are aware that a potentially large investor has entered the scene and may be looking to gain a significant position or even take over. Musk waited 21 days to disclose his position of approximately 9.6%, which, when revealed, caused the price of Twitter's stock to skyrocket.

Continue reading: Elon Musk now under investigation, broken rules saved him $143 million (full post)

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