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Call of Duty exclusivity: First Xbox, then PlayStation...now Xbox?

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Thu, Jan 20 2022 11:04 AM CST

Is Call of Duty now exclusive to Xbox? Will the franchise sill come to PlayStation? How long is Activision's marketing deal with Sony? These are major questions that will determine the future of Call of Duty, Microsoft, Activision, and Sony.

Call of Duty exclusivity: First Xbox, then PlayStation...now Xbox? 55 | TweakTown.com

Everyone wants to know whether or not Call of Duty is coming to PlayStation consoles after Microsoft buys Activision-Blizzard. Why spend $68.7 billion to release games on a competing platform? Money, for one--Call of Duty is a thunderous success on PlayStation hardware, and Sony has shipped over 116 million PS4s to date. That kind of install base mixed with powerhouse game sales equals lots of revenue.

But there's a chance Microsoft could keep Call of Duty off of PlayStation platforms in an effort to push Game Pass subscriptions. Quality content is a compelling reason to buy a subscription. Exclusive content is a better one.

Continue reading: Call of Duty exclusivity: First Xbox, then PlayStation...now Xbox? (full post)

Activision: This is the right transaction, right buyer, at right time

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Thu, Jan 20 2022 9:39 AM CST

Activision-Blizzard has issued a new SEC filing that explains terms and logistics to its developers and employees.

Activision: This is the right transaction, right buyer, at right time 1 | TweakTown.com

Why is Activision selling to Microsoft in a huge $68.7 billion deal? According to a new Securities Exchange Commission document, it's a simple matter of opportunism. "This is the right transaction, with the right buyer, at the right time," Activision said in the report.

Why is Activision Blizzard entering into the transaction now?

  • This is the right transaction, with the right buyer, at the right time.
  • The entertainment landscape is hitting an inflection point that will benefit companies that evolve in order for them to remain relevant and competitive. Bobby and the Board of Directors unanimously agreed this is an exciting opportunity for Activision Blizzard and its shareholders.
  • Together, Activision Blizzard and Microsoft will drive innovation, creativity, and advancement in the industry and create another competitive force in the metaverse.

Continue reading: Activision: This is the right transaction, right buyer, at right time (full post)

Sony to lose $260 million a year if Call of Duty goes Xbox exclusive

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Thu, Jan 20 2022 8:05 AM CST

Sony could lose hundreds of millions of dollars if Call of Duty becomes exclusive to Xbox platforms.

Sony to lose $260 million a year if Call of Duty goes Xbox exclusive 33 | TweakTown.com

Microsoft's recent $68.7 billion buyout of Activision-Blizzard has prompted a big question: Will Call of Duty still come to PlayStation? The answer isn't quite simple. But the numbers are: Key financial experts like CitiGroup estimate that Sony will lose 10 billion yen to 30 billion yen ($87.5 million to $262.6 million) if Call of Duty doesn't release on PlayStation systems.

Activision's megaton franchise contributes hundreds of millions in distribution payments to Sony, Microsoft, and other platform-holders like Valve every year. The annualized release cadence is a dependable source of third-party earning contributions for Sony. It could also be the same for Microsoft, who would pocket Activision's 70% cut of all Call of Duty game sales and revenues.

Continue reading: Sony to lose $260 million a year if Call of Duty goes Xbox exclusive (full post)

Sony believes Activision games won't be Xbox exclusive

Derek Strickland | Gaming | Thu, Jan 20 2022 7:02 AM CST

Sony believes that Microsoft will honor Activision's existing contractual obligations and keep specific games coming to PlayStation platforms.

Sony believes Activision games won't be Xbox exclusive 1 | TweakTown.com

Future Activision games won't be full Xbox exclusives and avoid PlayStation platforms, at least that's what Sony thinks. Following huge $68.7 billion Activision-Blizzard buyout, Sony believes that Microsoft will honor its existing contracts that were signed by Activision before the deal closes--which is something that Xbox CEO of Gaming Phil Spencer has already confirmed will happen.

"We expect that Microsoft will abide by contractual agreements and continue to ensure Activision games are multiplatform," Sony told The Wall Street Journal.

Continue reading: Sony believes Activision games won't be Xbox exclusive (full post)

Quantum computing passes 99% error-free threshold, now fault tolerant

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 6:00 AM CST

Three new studies published today in the journal Nature show independent achievements of highly reliable and robust quantum computing.

A team from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) achieved a 1-qubit operation fidelity of up to 99.95 percent and a 2-qubit fidelity of 99.37 percent. Their approach used silicon embedded with phosphorus atoms via ion implantation, a method used in producing all existing silicon computer chips, allowing their quantum breakthrough to be "compatible with the broader semiconductor industry."

"When the errors are so rare, it becomes possible to detect them and correct them when they occur. This shows that it is possible to build quantum computers that have enough scale, and enough power, to handle meaningful computation," said Professor Andrea Morello of UNSW regarding their breakthrough.

Continue reading: Quantum computing passes 99% error-free threshold, now fault tolerant (full post)

'Wet dress rehearsal' upcoming for NASA's Artemis 1 moon mission

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 5:30 AM CST

NASA's Artemis 1 moon mission will soon be another step closer to launching for real.

'Wet dress rehearsal' upcoming for NASA's Artemis 1 moon mission 01 | TweakTown.com

Artemis 1 intends to launch an uncrewed spacecraft toward the moon later this year and has an upcoming "wet dress rehearsal" scheduled for late February. A simulated countdown will ensure the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System (SLS) rocket are working as expected. The Orion spacecraft has flown only once before, and the Artemis 1 launch will mark the SLS rocket's first flight.

Since the new year, engineering tasks have readied the spacecraft, with the crew access arm for the Orion spacecraft being tested successfully on January 11th. The SLS also completed core stage engineering tests by January 14th, after replacing one of its four RS-25 engine controllers.

Continue reading: 'Wet dress rehearsal' upcoming for NASA's Artemis 1 moon mission (full post)

Classified satellite reaches space for China's first 2022 launch

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 5:00 AM CST

The Shiyan 13 test satellite has a currently unknown mission.

Classified satellite reaches space for China's first 2022 launch 01 | TweakTown.com

The satellite was launched from the northern Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) on January 17th at 10:35 a.m. local time (02:35 UTC) aboard a Long March 2D rocket. The launch site temperature was recorded at -37 degrees Celsius (-35 degrees Fahrenheit), requiring the launch team to add "product sealing measures" to the rocket to ensure a successful launch.

"The Experiment No. 13 satellite is mainly used to carry out space environment detection and related technology experiments," the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) wrote in a statement.

Continue reading: Classified satellite reaches space for China's first 2022 launch (full post)

How this volcano eruption led to several hours of lightning

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 4:30 AM CST

The new study was published in the Geological Society of America's journal Geology.

How this volcano eruption led to several hours of lightning 01 | TweakTown.com

The study focuses on the eruption of the Taal Volcano in the Philippines, which began a series of eruptions starting in January 2020, 43 years after its last eruption. The plume of volcanic ash rising led to thousands of land-to-ground lightning strikes occurring over several hours.

The electrical activity arises after the plume rises high enough in the atmosphere to freeze. Radio waves produced by lightning can be detected with remote sensing tools quickly, allowing scientists to collect data quickly. Along with lots of social media posts with pictures and videos of the event, scientists identified a "highly electrified region at the base of the umbrella cloud."

Continue reading: How this volcano eruption led to several hours of lightning (full post)

Hubble spots a black hole creating stars instead of destroying them

Adam Hunt | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 4:00 AM CST

A new study on the observation has been published in the journal Nature.

Hubble spots a black hole creating stars instead of destroying them 01 | TweakTown.com

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10, found 30 million light-years away in the constellation Pyxis. Hubble saw a gas outflow from the black hole at the center of the galaxy reaching into a star-forming region 230 light-years away and fostering the growth of stars, rather than suppressing it.

"From the beginning I knew something unusual and special was happening in Henize 2-10, and now Hubble has provided a very clear picture of the connection between the black hole and a neighboring star forming region located 230 light-years from the black hole," said Amy Reines, the principal investigator for the new Hubble observations.

Continue reading: Hubble spots a black hole creating stars instead of destroying them (full post)

Tonga volcanic eruption was so powerful NASA detected it in space

Jak Connor | Science, Space, Health & Robotics | Thu, Jan 20 2022 1:32 AM CST

In a recent article published in The Conversation, Gareth Dorrian, a Post Doctoral Research Fellow in Space Science, University of Birmingham, explains how the recent volcanic eruption was detected in space.

On January 15, an underwater volcano located 40 miles north of the Tongan capital erupted with the power equivalent to 10 megatons of TNT exploding, or more than 500 times as powerful as the nuclear bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima. The eruption spawned a tsunami that has devastated Tongan islands, wiping out most houses and structures, the event has been caused an "unprecedented disaster" by the Tongan government.

Dorrian explains in the article that the eruption has generated "atmospheric gravity waves" that were detected by a NASA satellite. These waves that were detected will allow Dorrian and fellow researchers to better understand the top layers of Earth's atmosphere from events happening on Earth, and how volcanic eruptions can impact space, as opposed to the alternative perspective of how space impacts the top layer of Earth's atmosphere.

Continue reading: Tonga volcanic eruption was so powerful NASA detected it in space (full post)

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