Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 4

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 4.

Rare diamond reveals existence of an ocean deep below Earth's surface

Adam Hunt | Sep 28, 2022 4:01 AM CDT

A study on the underground ocean titled "Hydrous peridotitic fragments of Earth's mantle 660 km discontinuity sampled by a diamond" has been published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Rare diamond reveals existence of an ocean deep below Earth's surface 02 | TweakTown.com

Researchers from the Goethe University in Frankfurt have analyzed a rare diamond that formed 660 kilometers (410.1 miles) below the Earth's surface and was sourced from Botswana, Africa. At this depth is the boundary between the lower mantle and the transition zone, the area between Earth's lower and upper mantle. Diamonds from this depth are extremely rare, and the one they found contained numerous inclusions of ringwoodite, the most common mineral at this depth.

The ringwoodite inclusions have high water content and provide evidence that the planet's water cycle includes the interior of the Earth, as slabs of the mantle shift and allow deep-sea sediments to work their way deeper into the Earth, taking water with them. The mineral content of the transition zone indicates it is capable of absorbing six times the amount of water found in the oceans above, but it wasn't known until now if it did actually store any of that water.

Continue reading: Rare diamond reveals existence of an ocean deep below Earth's surface (full post)

NASA crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid, these are its final images

Jak Connor | Sep 28, 2022 3:43 AM CDT

NASA recently announced its successfully collided its DART spacecraft into a target asteroid and right before the collision the spacecraft sent back these images.

NASA crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid, these are its final images 01 | TweakTown.com

NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) has been deemed a success in terms of achieving collision with an asteroid located about seven million miles from Earth with a human-made spacecraft. The DART mission is the world's very first planetary defense mission with the goal of demonstrating that an asteroid can be deflected with a spacecraft using a kinetic technique. Dimorphos, the target asteroid, is actually a moonlet, which is the smaller of the two that make up the binary asteroid system.

Dimorphos orbits a larger asteroid Didymos and NASA's goal with DART was to show that Dimorphos' orbit can be changed. The DART spacecraft was equipped with the Didymos Reconnaissance and Asteroid Camera for Optical navigation, or DRACO, which recorded the entire journey to the asteroid, including the final moments before impact. It should be noted that DART was traveling at a ridiculous speed of 14,000 mph when it collided into the surface of Dimorphos, which resulted in the final image seen below failing to fully send back to Earth before the spacecraft was destroyed.

Continue reading: NASA crashed a spacecraft into an asteroid, these are its final images (full post)

NASA and Hubble team up to showcase glorious spiral galaxies

Jak Connor | Sep 28, 2022 3:12 AM CDT

NASA has taken to its social channels to announce that the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope teamed up for a galactic group project.

NASA and Hubble team up to showcase glorious spiral galaxies 12 | TweakTown.com

The European Space Agency (ESA) has posted to its website detailing the group project that has honed in on the spiral galaxy known as IC 5332, which resides approximately 29 million light years away from Earth within the constellation Sculptor. As explained by the ESA, the above image was captured with Webb's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), showcasing the spiral galaxies' symmetry due to it appearing face-on to Earth.

It should be noted that the MIRI instrument operates only 7 degrees Celsius above absolute zero, the lowest possible temperature, and that MIRI does require this to capture the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. An example of this requirement is Hubble's inability to observe the mid-infrared spectrum as its mirrors aren't cool enough. If researchers attempted to view that spectrum, their observations would be dominated by radiation from the mirrors themselves, hence MIRI's extremely low operating temperature.

Continue reading: NASA and Hubble team up to showcase glorious spiral galaxies (full post)

International Space Station photographs Hurricane Ian gaining strength

Jak Connor | Sep 28, 2022 1:08 AM CDT

Picking up sustained wind speeds of 120 mph, Hurricane Ian pounded the western tip of Cuba with incredibly strong winds and is now making its way toward Florida.

According to reports from AccuWeather, Hurricane Ian has already become the strongest storm to make landfall in Cuba since 2017, and now the major hurricane has picked up intensity growing from a Category 3 hurricane to a Category 4 that is currently traveling over the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Meteorologists expect Ian to make landfall along the west coast of Florida on Wednesday during the late afternoon, hence the warnings that have already been sent out to residents in the danger-zone area that stretches from Tampa to Fort Myers.

Reports indicate that Ian will lose some intensity after breaking into a Category 4 storm as it will experience wind shear, which will disrupt the wind speed. However, AccuWeather forecasters still recommend Florida residents that are deciding to stay within the evacuation zone to prepare for a full-force major hurricane that will bring flooding, rain, high-speed winds, and likely coastal waters rising.

Continue reading: International Space Station photographs Hurricane Ian gaining strength (full post)

US intelligence posts new logo containing a UFO, was quickly removed

Jak Connor | Sep 28, 2022 12:31 AM CDT

A US intelligence agency has pulled down its newly updated logo as it realized it contained a depiction of a UFO, or more accurately, an Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon (UAP).

US intelligence posts new logo containing a UFO, was quickly removed 01 | TweakTown.com

As reported by CyberScoop, the US intelligence agency is the main aviation component and is called the National Intelligence Manager for the Air Domain, which serves under the Director of National Intelligence as its principal adviser on air domain issues. The US intelligence agency, also called NIM-Aviation, is the leading intelligence community in the analysis, identification, and integration of intelligence within the air domain. The report revealed that NIM-Aviation changed its official seal to an image that showcased a Russian fighter jet and a UFO.

When the public caught wind of this change, many believed it was a joke of some kind, that was until a spokesperson for the National Intelligence Manager for the Air Domain informed Cyberscoop that it had mistakenly posted an unofficial and incorrect logo. It's not known when the logo was first updated but reports indicate that it may have been posted as early as Saturday night as ufologist Jeremy Corbell tweeted out, "Not a bad new logo for the National Intelligence Manager for Aviation. A Lazar UFO in the official seal? Hahahhahaha. Radical. I still can't believe they did this".

Continue reading: US intelligence posts new logo containing a UFO, was quickly removed (full post)

NASA cancels Artemis 1 launch, hurricane forces rocket back to shelter

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2022 6:08 AM CDT

In a seemingly never-ending story of delays and postponing, NASA has rolled back its Artemis 1 rocket back to the Vehicle Assembly Building.

NASA has taken to its blog to announce that its team decided to roll back the Artemis 1 Space Launch System rocket along with the Orion spacecraft back to the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday, September 26, ahead of approaching Hurricane Ian that's expected to make landfall on September 29.

The decision by NASA came after the latest weather predictions were taken into account about the official expectations of Hurricane Ian and how the hurricane was going to affect the weather conditions in the Kennedy area. Furthermore, NASA writes on its blog that the decision to roll back the SLS rocket was to protect the rocket itself from the hurricane while also allowing employees time to address the needs of their families.

Continue reading: NASA cancels Artemis 1 launch, hurricane forces rocket back to shelter (full post)

Man combines 600,000 images of Jupiter to form his sharpest image ever

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2022 5:46 AM CDT

After more than half a million images of Jupiter were taken, an astrophotographer from Arizona combined them to create his sharpest image of the largest planet in our solar system.

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy revealed his creation on September 17, taking to his Instagram page Cosmic Background, that's dedicated to his astrophotography ventures. McCarthy explains in his post on Twitter that he took the opportunity of Jupiter being the closest to Earth than it has been in the last 59 years to snap around 600,000 photos of the planet over one night. Taking those images, McCarthy combined them using software designed to stack images.

It should be noted that Jupiter is still the closest it has been to Earth in the last 59 years, and on September 26, it was at its opposition for 2022, which means Jupiter at Earth will both be on the same side of the solar system, putting the planets at their closest possible proximity. Jupiter can still be viewed with the naked eye as the bright light in the eastern night sky, and as explained by McCarthy, by simply using binoculars, you can see the planet's four Galilean moons.

Continue reading: Man combines 600,000 images of Jupiter to form his sharpest image ever (full post)

Scientists discover sealed 3,300-year-old cave 'frozen in time'

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2022 3:45 AM CDT

A team of archaeologists has discovered a sealed cave that dates back 3,300 years to a time during the reign of Ramesses II.

Scientists discover sealed 3,300-year-old cave 'frozen in time' 26 | TweakTown.com

The announcement comes from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), and according to the statement, a team of archaeologists has discovered a cave sealed by ancient Egyptians 3,300 years ago that lived in the now-Israel. During that period of time, Ramesses II, which was commonly known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt and reigned from 1279 B.C to 1213 B.C.

During Ramesses the Great's reign, Egypt was at its most powerful with a kingdom that stretched from current-day Sudan all the way to Syria. The cave was discovered when a mechanical digger was being used to excavate dirt in the Palmahim Beach National Park when the digger accidentally penetrated the roof of the cave revealing its contents to the workers. The IAA was quickly called, and a mission was formed to descend into the cave.

Continue reading: Scientists discover sealed 3,300-year-old cave 'frozen in time' (full post)

NASA's DART spacecraft hits asteroid, video released of final moments

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2022 12:32 AM CDT

NASA has successfully conducted the world's first planetary defense mission, where the space agency launched a small spacecraft and hit a distant asteroid.

NASA has announced that its Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) has completed its objective of impacting a distant asteroid with its DART spacecraft. The space agency has taken to its social channels to share the final moments of the spacecraft approaching the large binary asteroid Didymos and its moonlet Dimorphos, both of which currently poses no threat to Earth at all. NASA's goal was to send the DART spacecraft to collide directly with Dimorphos, with the overall goal being to change the asteroid's orbit.

NASA launched the DART spacecraft in November 2021, and since then, the small spacecraft has been traveling millions of miles away from Earth toward its target. On its way to Dimorphos the spacecraft's Didymos Reconnaissance and Asteroid Camera for Optical navigation, or DRACO, snapped several images of a distant Jupiter. DRACO was also used by researchers to take thousands of pictures of stars, and with these images, researchers were able to make sure DART's trajectory lined up cleanly with Dimorphos. An effort that seems to have paid off.

Continue reading: NASA's DART spacecraft hits asteroid, video released of final moments (full post)

Google 'nasa dart' to watch NASA's spacecraft crash into your browser

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2022 12:03 AM CDT

After declaring that it was perfectly on track to collide with a distant asteroid, NASA announced a successful collision by its DART spacecraft.

In celebration of the mission, NASA has teamed up with Google to bring an interactive Google search query to the public. By simply Googling "nasa dart" in any browser, the user will get a simple demonstration of what NASA has just pulled off. As shown in the above GIF posted to Twitter on the official NASA Twitter account, users can Google "nasa dart" and see the DART spacecraft fly across the browser window and collide into the background, causing the browser to tip slightly.

The simple demonstration is a small representation of NASA's success with its Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), the very first planetary defense mission that one day may be extremely valuable if a dangerous asteroid is discovered that has a trajectory that lines up with Earth. For those that don't know, NASA launched its small DART spacecraft in November 2021, and since then, it has been traveling at 14,000 mph towards a binary asteroid system that isn't a threat to Earth.

Continue reading: Google 'nasa dart' to watch NASA's spacecraft crash into your browser (full post)

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