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Enermax Liqfusion 240 RGB CPU Cooler Review

Enermax Liqfusion 240 RGB CPU Cooler Review
The Enermax Liqfusion 240 RGB definitely has some benefits but also has some downsides, lets check out where the positives and negatives are.
By: Chad Sebring | CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jul 6, 2018 3:00 pm
TweakTown Rating: 82%Manufacturer: Enermax

Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

 

Looking to Enermax for liquid cooling solutions, it was that you either hunted down a Liqtech cooler or found one in the Liqmax series. What we do know of both groups of coolers is that Enermax did not want to pay the "tax" that Asetek puts on all of their coolers, so they went with a Chinese manufacturer. This almost bypassed the patent issue, but it usually meant that the coolers could not be sold on this side of the pond. However, still opting for a secondary AIO builder to make the new cooler, Enermax has stepped away from the who patent issue all together this time.

 

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To get out of any lawsuit, the main stipulation is that an AIO, to be legal in the USA, cannot have the pump inside of the head unit in a specific way, where there is not a separation between the CPU block and the pump. We have seen many ways to get around this idea in the past. Coolers with large head units to contain separated pumps and cold plates, designs more akin to custom loop designs, we have even seen the pumps placed on the radiator, and not like Swiftech would do it, but on funky brackets, which just made things ugly. Enermax is taking an avenue we have not seen yet, where they have incorporated the pump in-line with the tubing.

 

With a new series of coolers hitting the market, Enermax is now showing off the Liqfusion series. From what we can gather, currently there is one offering, but we can only assume more will follow soon. Not only does Enermax bring in a new way of controlling the flow of coolant into the Liqfusion series, but they also incorporated the Enermax T.B. RGB fans we looked at back in February. Not only is there a spectacular light show coming from the fans hanging on the radiator, but the head unit also has a similar light ring on it as well, and a transparent window on top to view a flow indicator. At first glance, things are going well for Enermax and their latest Liqfusion 240 RGB AIO, but we will need a closer look and to get the testing completed before we get too excited.

 

The ELC-LF240-RGB ships compatible with anything Intel has produced singe LGA775 and works with anything since AM2 for AMD. The materials that make up the loop are like that of other AIOs, where a copper base is used on the head unit, the aluminum is used in the radiator. The head unit is 74mm in diameter, but due to the mounting hardware that is built into it, one dimension is 95mm, and it stands 51mm tall. The tubing, which contains the pump assembly is 400mm from fitting to fitting, while the radiator is 120mm wide, 272mm long, and is 27mm thick. The cooler ships with some Dow Corning thermal paste, as well as a 100 ml bottle of coolant to refill the loop as needed. As far as the warranty is concerned, if anything were to go wrong with the product, Enermax covers you for two-years.

 

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The impeller of the pump spins on a ceramic bearing while sipping only 0.18 Amps of current. It is a 12V pump but uses a 3-pin fan connection to pull it from the motherboard. The included pair of fans are 120mm in size, and are part of the T.B., or Twister Bearing fans. With a rated lifespan three times that of the pump, and they do require 0.30 Amps through 4-pin fan connections. Airflow is rated as high at 102.17 CFM, but we feel they are adding the fans specifications together here. We also think the same of the 6.28 mmH2O rating of the static pressure. The T.B. fans are shown only to deliver 28 dB(A) of noise, and both fans are RGB backlit. This does mean that the fans have two leads to connect, the 4-pin PWM connection we mentioned earlier, as well as a 4-pin RGB connector.

 

While the design is slightly unconventional, we still will compare it to all of the other 240mm AIOs we have seen in the past, and that goes for the price as well. We would expect a cooler such as this to release to the market in the range of $129.99 to $139.99, as that is where many of the big name companies range with their AIOs. That being said, we find that Enermax is selling the Liqfusion 240 RGB with more reasonable expectations. Considering the fan kit we tested came with three fans for $99, we are already at $66 for the fans and control system. Now take into account that the cooler sells at Amazon for $119.99 and at Newegg for $113.99, you could conclude that you are paying only $50 to $60 for the cooler beyond the cost of the fans alone. However, when reviewing a product such as this, we do have to look beyond the bling-factor, and see if the entire design is worthy of investment. With that in mind, let's carry on, take a good look at the Liqfusion 240 RGB, do some testing, and let the pieces fall where they may.

 

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