UK ad agency: No Man's Sky wasn't falsely advertised

No Man's Sky 'unlikely to mislead' consumers based from the game's marketing, says UK ad agency.

@anthony256
Published Wed, Nov 30 2016 6:05 AM CST   |   Updated Tue, Nov 3 2020 11:57 AM CST

If there was a controversial game of 2016 award, it would have to go to No Man's Sky, for its years of hype - it had the world taken by storm when it heroically fell from gaming grace, and was one of the biggest disappointment to thousands of gamers. It was only days ago that the new Foundation Update was released, adding and fixing parts of No Man's Sky, with Hello Games founder Sean Murray finally breaking his silence, after going dark when the game was released.

UK ad agency: No Man's Sky wasn't falsely advertised | TweakTown.com

That hasn't stopped the UK's Advertising Standards Agency going over claims of No Man's Sky's listing on Steam was misleading, with upset gamers who provided screenshots, videos, and text about the game pre-release. In the evidence provided, the pre-release version of No Man's Sky had improved graphics, had better performance (instead of the myriad of problems PC gamers had) and planetary exploration.

These clips and explanations from the developer teased alien life, ship battles and warping - with gamers upset with the final state of No Man's Sky when it launched. The ASA disagreed in the end, saying that the materials provided were "largely representative of the final product and "unlikely to mislead" consumers", reports Engadget.

The ASA examined the Steam store page of No Man's Sky and the footage Hello Games used, with the ASA team then having the chillest job ever by playing No Man's Sky to see if it lined up with what the advertising by the developer shown on the Steam store page. After playing the game, the ASA said "In relation to these features, we considered that the ad did not depict gameplay that differed materially from the footage provided by Hello Games, and that it was therefore unlikely to mislead".

In the ASA's ruling of No Man's Sky, they said that Hello Games had tried to display No Man's Sky "in the best light", as any developer would do. The ASA said: "the overall impression of the ad was consistent with gameplay and the footage provided, both in terms of that captured by Hello Games and by third parties, and that it did not exaggerate the expected player experience of the game", with the ASA ruling that Hello Games has been, in short as Engadget puts it, "cleared of any wrongdoing".

Now, with the Foundation Update to the side, what are your thoughts on No Man's Sky? I haven't played the game personally, as I heard it was such a mess at launch that I don't have the time to waste to even be curious - not with Overwatch rocking so much (who else is looking forward to Competitive Mode again, S3 FTW).

NEWS SOURCE:engadget.com

Anthony is a long time PC enthusiast with a passion of hate for games built around consoles. FPS gaming since the pre-Quake days, where you were insulted if you used a mouse to aim, he has been addicted to gaming and hardware ever since. Working in IT retail for 10 years gave him great experience with custom-built PCs. His addiction to GPU tech is unwavering.

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