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GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7 TR4 Motherboard Review

By: Steven Bassiri | Socket TR4 Threadripper in Motherboards | Posted: Aug 22, 2017 4:20 pm
TweakTown Rating: 92%Manufacturer: GIGABYTE

Circuit Analysis

 

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The X399 AORUS Gaming 7 shows off its goods when its heat sinks come off.

 

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We get a true 8-phase VRM, made up of eight IR3556, 50A fully integrated (driver plus FETs) PowIRstages, and controlled by a fully digital IR35201 PWM controller in 8+0 phase mode. The inductors are rated for a maximum saturation current of 76A, and tantalum POSCAPs on the rear complete the LC (inductor/capacitor) filter circuit. By all accounts, this is a very high-end VRM, it just requires decent cooling, just like other high-performance VRMs.

 

 

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The SoC VRM is made up of two IR3556 (50A) PowIRstages, and another IR35201 digital PWM is used to control them. They also use POSCAPs can the 76A inductors, and provide more than enough juice for the SoC rail. Check out that USB 3.1 trace layout, they sure are avoiding small angles to make those turns (like they should). We can also see our first memory VRM, which uses an IR3570 3+2 phased digital PWM controller and two IR3553 (40A) PowIRstages for the main DDR4 voltage rail.

 

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Here we can get a glance of a full memory VRM, the second we have encountered so far. The IR3570, 3+3 phase digital PWM is most likely in a 2+1 phase mode. It controls two phases that make up the main DDR4 voltage, and one phase that most likely is for the DDR4 VPP rail (overkill). The Richtek RT8288A controller is used for GIGABYTE's DAC-UP 2 feature, which allows you to disable USB 3.0 voltage and only allow for data, or even boost the voltage above 5v.

 

Many users with external DACs would rather just get USB data and avoid the noise from the voltage on the USB line, and on the other hand, longer USB cables typically don't get 5v on the other end, so increasing voltage on one end can allow longer cables to correctly operate.

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