In-Win GreenMe 750-watt 80 PLUS Bronze Power Supply Review

In-Win goes green with their latest power supplies, but the green in your wallet might be spent better elsewhere.
@TweakTown
Published Mon, Sep 17 2012 1:19 AM CDT   |   Updated Fri, Sep 18 2020 10:50 PM CDT
Rating: 84%Manufacturer: In-Win

Introduction, Specifications, Availability and Pricing

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This time around we have a newcomer to our PSU test bench that almost everyone is sure to be familiar with. In-Win is well known for their wide selection of cases and a few power supplies. Earlier this year, In-Win launched a new series of power supplies dubbed GreenMe. The first thing that many will think by seeing the name is that the GreenMe is simply a highly efficient power supply that will suck down less power than the rest, but that couldn't be further from reality.

Taking a look at the specifications for the GreenMe series, you will find that these power supplies are only rated for 80Plus Bronze efficiency, reaching a maximum of 85% efficiency. Dig deeper into the name and we find out that GreenMe is more of a concept than a name that is "designed to protect our environment, our goal to create a bigger change with every subsequent step we take towards greater environmental responsibility."

There are two very big parts to this. The first is that all GreenMe power supplies are packed in a recycled cardboard box and that natural soy ink is used for the printing. The second is that In-Win has committed to donating $1 USD to the WWF for every unit sold in order to further protect the environment.

The GreenMe power supplies themselves look good on paper, too. Available in 550W, 650W and 750W flavors, the units sport up to four 12V rails. In-Win says that they use Japanese capacitors on the inside and that all the cables are fully sleeved. If they perform as well as they sound, they could prove to be both a benefit to you and the environment at the same time.

Let's start taking an in-depth look at the GreenMe 750W to find out what it has to offer.

Specifications, Availability and Pricing

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We haven't seen a quad rail power supply in the 700W-900W range for a while, but the GreenMe 750W offers four 12V rails. Each is rated for 25A with a combined output of 648W or 54A. Both the 3.3V and 5V rails are rated for 20A each for total of 120W. The 5VSB rail is rated for 3A or 15W. Maximum total output is 750W.

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Taking a look at the feature summary, we can tell that this is certainly more of a budget power supply. The unit doesn't have any modular cables, but all of them are fully sleeved. Nowhere does In-Win list that the GreenMe 750W features over temperature protection. Also lacking from the feature list is the rating for 100% continuous output at 50C. All GreenMe power supplies are rated for 80 PLUS Bronze efficiency.

We had a bit of trouble finding the GreenMe 750W power supply for sale. In-Win lists the MSRP of the unit at $99 and we were able to find it for sale at AireTech IT for $90.43, but that doesn't do those of us in the U.S. much good since they are a UK company. Even In-Win doesn't offer the unit for sale on their own website. We were however able to find the 650W model available at Newegg, so we suspect there is just a stock issue at the moment.

Packaging

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As you would expect from something packaged in recycled cardboard and only utilizing natural soy ink, the box isn't very vivid. It does feature very pertinent information on the front though such as the wattage, warranty duration and 80 PLUS rating.

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We find a good list of features and specifications on the back. The sticker used to seal the box also lets you know that In-Win will be donating to the WWF.

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One side of the box simply contains barcode information and a serial number.

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The other side contains In-Win's GreenMe concept.

Inside the Box

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Pulling things out of the box, we find two more boxes and a user manual. One box contains the PSU while the other contains the power cable, mounting screws, etc.

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Our first glimpse at the unit reveals that it is pure white and the top is entirely blank.

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Moving to the side, we find the I/O specification label plastered here.

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The other side is identical just as blank as the top.

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Rolling around to the back, we find the standard honeycomb mesh grill with on/off rocker switch and AC input.

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Even the front of the power supply is relatively lifeless with nothing going on. The cable sleeving does extend all the way into the unit which is nice to see.

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Things are very standard on the bottom of the unit as well. The 120mm fan provides the active cooling for the GreenMe 750W.

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Also included are the user manual, mounting screws, AC power cord and a few Velcro cable ties.

Cabling Arrangement and A Look Inside

Cabling Arrangement

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Those of you looking at the cable summary are probably thinking that it is rather bland for a 750W power supply and you're right. We are still trying to figure out how you are realistically going to pull 750W of power out of a power supply with only two PCI-E connectors. You shouldn't have to use adapters to pull the full wattage of a power supply and the only way you're going to need 750W of power is with dual GPU's and those are sure to need dual PCI-E connectors for each card. Cable length also appears to be rather short so for those planning on getting creative with your routing; you might want to do some measurements first.

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Rail distribution is well thought out and the end user shouldn't have to do anything to balance the rails out as it is done naturally. 12V1 takes care of the Main and all peripheral connectors. 12V2 handles power for the ATX 4+4 connector. Each PCI-E cable has its own rail, taking care of 12V3 and 12V4.

A Look Inside

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Taking a look inside we find a very simplistic unit with a duo of heatsinks to provide passive cooling for the GreenMe 750W.

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A single Panasonic cap covers the primary side of the In-Win GreenMe 750W power supply.

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Over on the secondary side of the power supply, we find a mix to Teapo and Suscon. While the unit does feature Japanese caps on the front, it doesn't feature them all the way around and some of our expectations just went out the window.

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Active cooling is provided by the ADDA AD1212LB-A70GL 120mm fan.

Test Results and Final Thoughts

Test Results

Our load tests utilize a couple of FAST ATE active load testers and a variety of other equipment such as an oscilloscope, power conditioner, temperature probe and a power consumption meter. You can read more about our standard testing approach here.

The tests performed are based around six conceivable setups that are out there and progressively load down the PSU up to the power supply's limits or 1000W, whichever comes first. Since our test equipment's limits are greater than that of the In-Win GreenMe 750W, we can test it to the maximum.

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The above tests represent typical loads that we have measured from various systems and are meant to give a rough idea of where your computer might fall in line with our tests. Please keep in mind that each system is different and actual loads can vary greatly even with similar hardware.

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Let's start by taking a look at the voltages to see how well this unit did during testing. Starting with the 12V rails, we see 3% regulation from start to finish. 12V1 fared the worst and showed a total drop of .31V from start to finish. 12V4 faired the best and showed a total drop of .25V from start to finish. The 5V rail managed to stay within 3% of specification with a total drop of .15V from start to finish. Moving towards the 3.3V rail, we see that regulation was still within 4% with a total voltage drop of .12V.

DC Output quality for the In-Win GreenMe 750W was just what we expected after seeing the Suscon capacitors on the inside. During Test 1, we saw 14mV of noise on our scope. This steadily increased with the loads on the power supply and by the time we reached Test 3, the ripple climbed to 33mV. After Test 3, we saw a rapid rise in the nose on the 12V rails. Test 4 show an increase to 55mV and by the time we reached full load in Test 5, the noise had increased to 79mV.

The In-Win GreenMe 750W is rated for 80Plus Bronze efficiency. This means that the power supply must perform at 82%/85%/82% efficiency at 20%/50%/100% loads respectively. As you can see, the GreenMe 750W passed on our bench although it was really pushing it at the end. Nevertheless, a pass is a pass.

Final Thoughts

I want to start off by saying that the In-Win GreenMe 750W power supply is not a bad unit. Over the past several months, we have taken a look at many very high-end power supplies and it is easy to look down upon a budget unit simply because it doesn't perform like the very best. One must remember that the GreenMe 750W power supply is very much so a budget unit and as such it will not have the best performance possible.

Taking a look at the performance from the unit, it passes in every single test we threw at it. No, the voltages don't have the tightest regulation, the ripple is a lot higher than we are used to seeing and the efficiency really fell off at the end. It still passes all ATX specification with plenty of room to spare and that is what matters most.

It is when we start looking at the package as a hole that things fall apart a little bit. The unit is competitively priced at $99. Unfortunately you can get almost everything In-Win offers in the GreenMe 750W and more for the same price or slightly less from other manufacturers including better connector availability, build quality and warranty.

In-Win does provide a little extra with the donation to the WWF and the recycled packaging, but that only goes so far.

If In-Win would drop the price on the GreenMe 750W, it would go a long way towards making the power supply a bit more attractive.

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Chris Ramseyer started his career as a LAN Party organizer in Midwest USA. After working with several computer companies he was asked to join the team at The Adrenaline Vault by fellow Midwest LAN Party legend Sean Aikins. After a series of shake ups at AVault, Chris eventually took over as Editor-in-Chief before leaving to start Real World Entertainment. Look for Chris to bring his unique methods of testing Hard Disk Drives, Solid State Drives as well as RAID controller and NAS boxes to TweakTown as he looks to provide an accurate test bed to make your purchasing decisions easier.

We openly invite the companies who provide us with review samples / who are mentioned or discussed to express their opinion. If any company representative wishes to respond, we will publish the response here. Please contact us if you wish to respond.

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