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CIA Chief wants to spy on you through internet connected appliances

CIA plans to use newly internet-connected devices to spy on persons of interest.

@tracehagan
Trace Hagan
Published Mon, Mar 19 2012 12:00 PM CDT   |   Updated Tue, Apr 7 2020 11:25 AM CDT

It seems like everything is connected to the internet these days, but have you ever stopped and asked yourself what the implications of this is on your daily life? Sure, it provides convenience, but at what cost? All of these internet connected devices are able to collect information on where you are and what you're doing at the moment and use that information to generate a pretty solid schedule of your daily life.

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But none of this should be of worry to you, right? But what if you become a person of interest of any of the many spy agencies? Imagine if your a person of interest and you decide to adjust your internet connected lights at home. As soon as you fire up your app, it could be sending data that contains your location and a timestamp which could easily allow a spy to follow you.

CIA Chief Petraeus said:

Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvesters - all connected to the next-generation internet using abundant, low-cost, and high-power computing, the latter now going to cloud computing, in many areas greater and greater supercomputing, and, ultimately, heading to quantum computing.

Scared yet? I'm not done. The CIA Chief is interested in his ability to create new online identities for spies as well as erase them when agents need to disappear. "Proud parents document the arrival and growth of their future CIA officer in all forms of social media that the world can access for decades to come," Petraeus observed. "Moreover, we have to figure out how to create the digital footprint for new identities for some officers." Facebook's new Timeline feature was recently dropped into the hands of the CIA. It allows people to quickly review the online identity of someone all the way back to birth. What an easy way for new online identities to be created for agents. Thanks Mr. Zuckerberg, thanks.

NEWS SOURCE:wired.com

Trace is a starving college student studying Computer Science. He has a love of the English language and an addiction for new technology and speculation. When he's not writing, studying, or going to class, he can be found on the soccer pitch, both playing and coaching, or on the mountain snowboarding.

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