NASA snaps image of Mount Vesuvius looking through a sea of clouds

A NASA satellite has been used to capture an awesome image of one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes - Mount Vesuvius.

@JakConnorTT
Published Tue, Jan 18 2022 12:31 AM CST   |   Updated Sun, Feb 13 2022 5:09 PM CST

Mount Vesuvius is one of the most dangerous volcanoes on Earth, and now an incredible bird-eye view of the volcano has been captured with a NASA satellite.

NASA snaps image of Mount Vesuvius looking through a sea of clouds 02 | TweakTown.com
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NASA's Landsat 8 satellite has been used to capture a phenomenal image of one of the few active volcanoes located on Europe's mainland. NASA's Earth Observatory blog post explains that Mount Vesuvius is a "composite stratavolcano" that is comprised of "pyroclastic flows, lava flows and debris". These volcanic debris have accumulated over thousands of years to form the iconic volcanic cone we can see in the above image.

The blog post notes that more than 3 millions people live in Naples, a city in Italy and around 800,000 people live on the slopes of the volcano, making it "one of the most dangerous volcanoes on the planet". Vesuvius has had eight major eruptions in the last 17,000 years and the most famous would have to be an eruption that occurred in A.D 79 when the volcano wiped out the roman city of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The most recent eruption occurred on March 17, 1944 and the volcano destroyed the village of San Sebastiano, Italy.

NASA snaps image of Mount Vesuvius looking through a sea of clouds 01 | TweakTown.com
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Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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