Oculus just made it much easier to build WebXR apps for Quest

Oculus Quest developers have a handful of new tools at their disposal to help them create, optimize, and distribute VR software.

@pumcypuhoy
Published Thu, May 20 2021 11:37 PM CDT   |   Updated Thu, Jun 17 2021 10:53 PM CDT

Oculus recently rolled out update 1.8 of the Oculus Developer Hub, introducing a handful of new features that simplify the lives of VR developers building content for the Oculus Quest platform.

Oculus just made it much easier to build WebXR apps for Quest 01 | TweakTown.com

Oculus Developer Hub 1.8 includes a new home page with developer updates from Oculus. It also has a new App Distribution page, allowing developers to publish in-development apps for limited distribution for testing purposes. The distribution system includes four release channels: Alpha, Beta, and RC for internal testing and Production for submission to Oculus for store approval.

The new Oculus Developer Hub makes it easy for developers to open run the OVR Metrics Tool, which helps developers optimize the performance of their Quest apps. The latest version allows you to record and save the metrics graphs for analyzing performance issues.

Developers working on WebXR projects will be happy to learn that Oculus added a new feature to the Oculus Developer Hub that allows you to launch a web address on a Quest headset from the desktop app. No more typing long URLs with the Touch controllers.

Check out the Oculus Developer Blog for a complete list of all the updates and changes.

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Kevin joined the TweakTown team in 2020 and has since kept us informed daily on the latest news. Kevin is a lifelong tech enthusiast. His fascination with computer technology started at a very young age when he watched a family friend install a new hard drive into the family PC. After building his first computer at 15, Kevin started selling custom computers. After graduating, Kevin spent ten years working in the IT industry. These days, he spends his time learning and writing about technology - specifically immersive technologies like augmented reality and virtual reality.

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