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TweakTown News Posts - Page 45

HBO, Showtime trying to get special streaming deal from ISPs

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Online Video | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 2:45 pm

HBO, Showtime and Sony are speaking with major Internet service providers (ISPs) in an effort to get "specialized services" as they look to launch online streaming video services.

 

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Ideally, the streaming services don't want to use the Internet's "main thoroughfare" and would rather see their streaming video be allowed special treatment - so instead of facing normal Internet congestion, they could provide more reliable Internet pipelines.

 

The FCC prevents this type of preferential treatment, but a deal could be granted based on the "specialized services" effort.

Continue reading 'HBO, Showtime trying to get special streaming deal from ISPs' (full post)

IBM: Mobile app developers aren't focusing enough on security

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Apps | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 1:30 pm

Even though mobile apps are becoming more popular in the workplace, ensuring the apps are secure isn't a major priority. Companies must ensure that apps are properly tested to make sure only authorized users have access to data, even if that makes bring your own device (BYOD) a bit more complicated.

 

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"Building security into mobile apps is not top-of-mind for companies, giving hackers the opportunity to easily reverse-engineer apps, jailbreak mobile devices and tap into confidential data," said Caleb Barlow, VP of mobile management and security at IBM, in a statement.

 

Security verification is important, and companies that neglect this process leave themselves open - especially when apps access company Wi-Fi networks, and are used to share corporate documents. Even worse, clever hackers are finding new ways to breach confidential networks, relying on unsecure mobile apps as an entry point.

Greatfire.org anti-censorship group in China suffers major DDoS attack

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Hacking & Security | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 10:18 am

Greatfire.org, a Chinese non-profit group designed to help users circumvent the "Great Firewall of China," endured a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack. The group is facing charges up to $30,000 per day for bandwidth from traffic related to the cyberattack, it says.

 

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The group's website reported traffic 2,500 times higher than usual - and while it's unknown who is behind the attack - it wouldn't be surprising if the Chinese government was found to be responsible. Greatfire.org has received public criticism from China, which is notorious for strict control of access for its growing number of Internet users.

 

To help keep its services online, Greatfire.org has hosted websites on major tech companies, such as Amazon, which would receive far too much public criticism if they started censoring data.

Continue reading 'Greatfire.org anti-censorship group in China suffers major DDoS attack' (full post)

Chinese military rejects accusations it hacked Register.com

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Hacking & Security | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 9:20 am

Web.com's Register.com was reportedly victimized by a coordinated cyberattack, and the Chinese military was reportedly responsible, according to a story published by the Financial Times. The hackers had access for around one year, though it doesn't appear client data was taken or there was a significant disruption to day-to-day activities.

 

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However, Chinese officials deny being linked to the attack: "The relevant criticism that Chinese military participated in Internet hacking is to play the same old tune, and is totally baseless," according to a statement released to the Chinese Defense Ministry, submitted to Reuters.

 

The Chinese government has a sophisticated cyberattack program, and enjoys launching a number of cyberespionage campaigns against the United States and other western targets. Meanwhile, the Chinese government reports being a victim of international cyberattack, including many attacks that reportedly originate from the United States.

Target customers might have hard time collecting class-action payout

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Hacking & Security | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 8:05 am

Target may have agreed to a $10 million class-action lawsuit settlement, but trying to actually collect payment could be rather difficult. Consumers trying to cash in will need to submit documentation of fraudulent losses, which can be rather hard to prove.

 

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Many fraudulent charges are caught by a bank or credit card company - and even if a charge isn't caught - the bank or credit card company typically takes care of fraud-based purchases.

 

"The law generally does not compensate consumers for their hassle," the USA Today learned. "In terms of being able to document that and say, I as a consumer have suffered legal damages, that's a very tough putt for a consumer."

Continue reading 'Target customers might have hard time collecting class-action payout' (full post)

Fitbit CEO: Don't worry about wearables causing cancer to wearers

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Wearable Computing | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 7:20 am

Fitbit CEO James Park doesn't buy into long-term health care concerns over smartwatches and other wearables, despite a recent New York Times story.

 

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The story noted that similar to smartphones, wearables could be linked to cancer, due to radiation being emitted - but Park and others believe this type of research needs to be more carefully examined.

 

"In general, cell phones are definitely a very different beast than the low powered wearables," Park said in a statement to TIME. "The transmit energies are orders of magnitude higher. So if people are comfortable wearing Bluetooth headsets, I think wearables are even less of a concern because Bluetooth headsets are also close to your head. Wearables are not, unless you happen to sleep right on top of your wrists."

Continue reading 'Fitbit CEO: Don't worry about wearables causing cancer to wearers' (full post)

Delphi's driverless car will start nationwide journey later today

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Technology in Vehicles | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 7:08 am

Delphi plans to show off the true potential of autonomous vehicle technology when its driverless car begins a cross-country trip later today, leaving California and heading to New York. A driver will be present to take over in case of an emergency.

 

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The 3,500-mile journey will be used so engineers are able to collect valuable live data that can further enhance the self-driving car technology. The vehicle is able to accurately navigate a 4-way stop, safely pass cyclists, and merge and exit highways on its own.

 

"Delphi had great success testing its car in California and on the streets of Las Vegas," said Jeff Owens, chief technology officer of Delphi. "now it's time to put our vehicle to the ultimate test by broadening the range of driving conditions. This drive will help us collect invaluable data in our quest to deliver the best automotive grade technologies on the market."

ISPs offer up home routers that pose serious security threats

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Hacking & Security | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 6:35 am

Internet service providers (ISPs) are being criticized for distributing routers that are known for having security vulnerabilities that leave users vulnerable. A whopping 14 supplier provided ADSL routers that have firmware released in 2007 or newer, so hackers are able to gain overwhelming control of home networks.

 

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Up to 80 million devices that are used in households and small offices can be compromised simply because new users don't bother to change default passwords - and it's even easier to find Internet-exposed routers. In addition to Internet scans, some websites are known for publishing which devices are vulnerable to outside tampering.

 

"Wide swathes of IP space are being made vulnerable through ISPs in developing countries distributing routers with default passwords that can be easily found on the Internet," said Kyle Lovett, Cisco consultant, while speaking at CrestCon & IISP Congress 2015.

FireEye: People, not technology, to blame in online cyberattacks

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Hacking & Security | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 5:21 am

A rise in cyberattacks can be attributed as an attack by people, as companies spend even more on boosting endpoint security. Many IT experts and business leaders see cyberattacks as a technology issue, but it's really a focus on people.

 

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Cybersecurity experts are increasingly focused on educating employees on spotting phishing attempts, and fighting against attacks that rely on employees being rather naive and reckless.

 

"When you do think of it that way, then you tend to do a bunch of bad things," said Dave Merkel, CTO of FireEye, in a statement to ZDNET. "Such as ask bad questions to your security team like, 'What product can I buy to make this go away?' The answer is you can't just buy a product that is going make the bad guys go away forever."

Continue reading 'FireEye: People, not technology, to blame in online cyberattacks' (full post)

Report: Self-driving vehicles still not as safe as human drivers.. yet

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Technology in Vehicles | Posted: Mar 22, 2015 4:50 am

Fully autonomous vehicles could be on the road by 2020, and the technology is developing rapidly, although some researchers note that self-driving vehicles aren't as safe as human drivers just yet.

 

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"It's a highly disruptive technology that's coming on a lot faster than people expect," said Barrie Kirk, exezcutive director of the Canadian Automated Vehicles Centre of Excellence group, in a statement to CBC. "Humans, generally, are poor drivers."

 

However, researcher Steve Shladover, from the Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology (PATH) program at the University of California, believes it's only a matter of time before a major accident occurs: "Think about things like mobile phones and laptop computers... they don't run nearly that long without failures... but we're expecting a car to now operate that long without a failure in a very complicated environment?"

Continue reading 'Report: Self-driving vehicles still not as safe as human drivers.. yet' (full post)

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