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Cooler Master MASTERAIR MA410P CPU Cooler Review

Cooler Master MASTERAIR MA410P CPU Cooler Review
Cooler Master did some things right with what was changed but also has done some things wrong, lets take a good look at it.
By: Chad Sebring | CPU Air Coolers in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Mar 1, 2018 4:00 am
TweakTown Rating: 83%Manufacturer: Cooler Master

Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

 

 

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For those of you who have followed our CPU cooler reviews, what you are about to see may cause a bit of déjà vu. This is because, just over a year ago, we had a look at a CPU cooler called the Masterair Pro 4 from Cooler Master, and it appears that what we bring forth today is a refresh of that design. That being said, while the bulk of the design is identical, there are two changes which have been made. First of all, there is a new fan which moves this cooler into the RGB trend, and the second change has to do with the hardware to install it.

 

 

Since we have a pretty good idea of how it should perform, with the new fan being the only question mark in the equation, we do not expect to be completely surprised with what we find in testing. However, many love the RGB LED option, and with that being said where the older version had nothing to give in this aspect, now your CPU cooler from Cooler Master can work with any motherboard software and deliver the same effects as the motherboard, solidifying the theme. Not only that but for those without capable motherboards, Cooler Master has included a set of inline switches which will allow the user to select colors and modes for the fan to present while in use.

 

Cooler Master's refresh of the design is now called the Masterair MA410P. The naming is pretty simple to follow, as the Ma signifies the Masterair series, the four denotes the number of heat pipes, and the P at the end is something Cooler Master is doing with all of their products these days.

 

From what we can recall, the original design was able to hold its ground quite well, and the noise was not out of control either. We can only hope that we see more of the same this time around, as the new hardware will make the install easier on the user, and the RGB LED fan will accommodate anyone's needs as far as lighting goes. At this point, all we have to do to figure it all out is have a look at the MA410P, complete the testing, and see where she ends up in our charts.

 

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Following what is presented in the chart from Cooler Master, we see that the Masterair MA410P goes by the model number MAP-T4PN-220PC-R1, and it will fit on all Intel sockets since and including LGA1366. On the AMD side of things, AM2 is the oldest socket it will fit on, but also covers sockets all the way through to AM4. By itself, without the fan, the tower is 60mm thick, 116mm wide, and stands 158.5mm tall. With the fan on the cooler, the thickness increases to 84mm, while the width also increases to 129mm due to the fan mounting hardware.

 

Four 6mm diameter heat pipes are running through the tower, which use Continuous Direct Contact 2.0 to mate with the CPU IHS. The fins of the tower are made of aluminum, and all told, there are fifty-seven of them. We are also shown that the heat sink is said to weigh in at just 420 grams, which is light for a tower CPU cooler, so no worries about weight on the sockets causing odd pin pressures.

 

The fan of choice to cool this tower is the MasterFan 120 AB, which also sports the model number DF1202512RFMN, just in case you need to know when attempting to locate the optional second fan for a push/pull arrangement. The fan is 120mm in size but can deliver speeds of up to 2000 RPM. At that speed, the CFM is rated at 66.7, and there is also 2.34 mmH2O of static pressure.

 

This fan can run for 160,000 hours and is shown to top out at 30 dB(A) as far as noise is concerned. The MF120 AB is powered by a 4-pin PWM connection, which sips 0.28 Amps at just 3.36 Watts. The last thing seen on the chart is that the tower, as well as the fan, is guaranteed against defects and failure for two years.

 

At this time, as we attempt to hunt down a retail price, we see that Newegg is the one with this cooler on the shelves, as no listing appeared on Amazon. Newegg may be doing some funny price manipulation, but it shows there that the Masterair MA410P originally was to be sold at an astounding $80.99. If that is true, there is no way in the world that Cooler Master will sell many of these coolers.

 

With the feeling that Newegg is trying to make you feel better about the current price of $48.79, which is where we would expect a cooler of this magnitude to retail for, we are happy to see it priced below $50, and is an affordable option for the masses. Compared to pricing we have seen currently for the original Masterair Pro 4 at $44, an extra $5 for better hardware and an RGB fan is well worth the small bump in pricing.

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