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Scythe FUMA 2 CPU Cooler Review (Page 1)

Scythe FUMA 2 CPU Cooler Review

Scythe's FUMA 2 CPU cooler gets fully examined today. Should you add it to your list of potential new coolers? Let's see.

By Chad Sebring from Nov 1, 2019 @ 11:50 CDT
TweakTown Rating: 96%Manufacturer: ScytheModel: SCFM-2000

Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

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For those who are unaware of who Scythe is, it may be time to crawl out from under that rock! They have done well in our time working with them to tend to gravitate to the top half of our charts, yet can do so without charging massive amounts of money for their cooling solutions. It used to be that many top performers could be found in the wild for fifty dollars or less, but the market and economy seemed to have changed, to where now many companies find no issue charging double what the industry used to consider "normal." However, we are not here to bash companies; we are here to praise Scythe for being one of the ever-shrinking list of a few manufacturers that believe you should not have to take out a loan to grab a CPU cooler to obtain better than average results!

At one time, Scythe was dropping new coolers right and left into the market, but as of late, it seems they are on a revision kick. To us, this is fine because the original designs were already good, and if Scythe can find a way to tweak previous designs while offering the customer more values, we are certainly game for that! It is a revision that has us here today with Scythe. We are saddened that we have not seen the entire lineup of this specific design, but we did get our hands-on the Revision B version, and at that time, it held its ground with CLC options as well as other dual-tower cooler designs.

Since then, the market has changed with what customers expect from air coolers these days. While reducing thermals is the primary factor to buy any aftermarket coolers, mid-tower cases are more prevalent, requirements for tall memory with fancy RGB LEDs much be able to be cleared, and ease of use all come into play. Scythe has heard the chatter and has decided rather than to be a revision C, and they are now offering it as the Scythe Fuma 2. What you are about to see is a dual-tower design that fits many of the requests we mentioned, all while keeping a sense of sleek styling, and all while adding very little noise to the system! For those who tend to shy away from liquid cooling, and want a tower cooler that can run with the big dogs, without having to fork out the big bucks to own it, you may want to pay close attention to what follows in this review.

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In the chart borrowed from the Fuma 2 product page, we see that it starts with some of the specifications. We see that this model is also known as the SCFM-2000 and that it fits anything Intel made, including LGA775 and onward, but with AMD compatibility, it starts with AM2. Overall dimensions of the Fuma 2 are 137mm of width, including the tips of the wire fan clips. It is 131mm from front to back, including the fans, and stands 154.5mm tall. Being a dual-tower design, we do expect some heft, and the rated 1000 grams is of no surprise to us. We are also shown that six 6mm diameter heat pipes are running through the tower, but Scythe does not mention the 48 fins in each stack, plus each stack has a black top cover fin with their logo pressed into it as well.

Cooling the tower are a pair of Kaze Flex fans, but various thicknesses. The leading fan is 120mm in size, but only 15mm in thickness. Its speed ranges from 300 RPM on up to 1200 RPM, delivering 33.86 CFM of airflow and 0.9 mmH2O of static pressure, and is powered with a 4-pin PWM connection. The second fan, the one that installs between the towers is a 120mm fan, but this time it is 25mm thick. The speed range is the same as the thinner ones, but the CFM has increased to 51.17, static pressure is increased slightly to 1.05 mmH2O, and again, it is powered with a 4-pin PWM connector. As for the noise levels, the 15mm thick fan is shown to deliver 23.9 dB(A), while the 25mm thick fan is shown to top out at 24.9 dB(A).

With such a compact list of specifications, Scythe opts for renderings to help customers sort out the size and clearances. Using seven renderings, we have the cooler dimensions explained a little better, how the offset works to aide in RAM clearance, and even shows the fans and why the dimensions vary due to Scythe using rubber pads on the fans to isolate vibrations, but does deliver a few millimeters of extra size from front to back.

The last thing we have to inform you about is the cost of this cooler, and we feel many will be pleasantly surprised by this. Not only can this cooler fit in cases that many of the dual-tower designs are too tall to work inside of, but we are also close to that magic $50 price we love to see in air cooling a CPU. Right now, as we look at the Amazon listing, we see that the Scythe Fuma 2 is listed at just $59.99, and that is with free shipping included. At this time, we would not bother with Newegg, as the only listings found there are from third-party retailers, asking double the MSRP for their coolers. As it sits, the Scythe Fuma 2 has a lot going for it on paper, and the price is enticing, but we still have to take a closer look and get some testing done so that we can show you why the Fuma 2 is worth your attention!

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* Prices last scanned on 11/20/2019 at 10:47 pm CDT - prices may not be accurate, please click for very latest pricing
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