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Aerocool Project 7 P7-C1 Pro Mid-Tower Chassis Review

Aerocool Project 7 P7-C1 Pro Mid-Tower Chassis Review
Aerocool's new Project 7 P7-C1 Pro mid-tower computer case gets fully examine as we see what it's all about.
By: Chad Sebring | Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Aug 18, 2017 5:52 pm
TweakTown Rating: 93%Manufacturer: Aerocool

Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

 

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Between writing the last review for Aerocool and the one we are bringing to you know, something has been pointed out to us, which seemed to slip past us. We were under the assumption that the Project 7 series was an entirely new bird. As was pointed out to us; there were reviews of cases from this series almost a year ago. Now, that being said, we will not look at this chassis any differently. We just wanted to clear the air, if, in our last review, we came off a bit weird with what you may have already seen from other sites or online while shopping.

 

 

That out of the way, we can now move on to the reason you are here reading this, a refresh of the P7-C1. The P7-C1 was and still is a prized case by those who got their hands-on one, but Aerocool thought they could improve upon the chassis, and brings it into this year's latest and greatest technologies. Aerocool has taken the P7-C1 and rather than just add an LED strip and a naked hub to control it, this time around we get a kit called the P7-F12 Pro added into the mix.

 

The new release of this case is known as the P7-C1 Pro. What the P7-F12 Pro adds to the mix is a new way of lighting. Not only do you get a trio of RGB fans down the front of the case, but there is a new hub called the P7-H1, which allows for software customization as well, rather than the simpler options we saw in the P7-C0. Other than the removal of a pair of buttons from the front I/O, those of you who were aware of the original Project 7 cases, will find something very familiar here.

 

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Sent over to us was a sales brochure, and in it were the specifications charts you are seeing. The P7-C1 Pro mid-tower chassis comes in black or white and is made of ABS plastic and 0/6mm thick steel panels. This chassis is capable of having an ATX, Micro-ATX or Mini-ITX motherboard installed in it, and offers the tempered glass to view it through. The P7-C1 Pro is 244.5mm wide, stands 550mm tall, it is 446.4mm deep, and weighs in at 8.8kg, or just less than twenty pounds. There are no optical bays, but there are three locations for 3.5" drives and four to house 2.5" drives in. At the back, the P7-C1 Pro has seven expansion slots, which are not replaceable.

 

Cooling is handled with four fans in total, three 120mm fans in the front, and a 120mm fan in the back. The front of the chassis can hold any three 120mm fans or a pair of 140mm fans. The top of the case will allow for a pair of 120mm fans, and the back is said only to fit 120mm fans. Water cooling options are as follows. A 240 or 280mm radiator can go in the front, a 240mm radiator in the top, and the rear of the chassis is an option for a single 120mm radiator.

 

On the right, we see the mention of the P7-H1, which is the hub part of the P7-F12 Pro kit. It requires Windows 7 or newer to run with and is controlled via a USB 2.0 connection. The hub delivers two spots for 4-pin LED output, with a total of 24W of power. The hub also has a set of five fan ports, which can draw up to 18W, and is done with another lead from the hub using PWM to control the fans.

 

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We also grabbed the specifications for the F7-F120 Pro kit, so we could see what it is capable of. There are three 120mm fans, which we already mentioned were RGB LED capable, but with this chart, we see all of the details. These fans can spin at up to 1600 RPM, with 12V of power, and push 1.21 mmH2O of pressure with 62.58 CFM of airflow too. The fan blades spin on a hydraulic bearing, they should last 60,000 hours, and all while being rated at just 22.25 dB(A) of noise. The lower section is for the hub, and we have covered that. We do not get screws though, there were no extra zip ties, nor was there a Velcro strap, but Aerocool does make certain it can be mounted, and there are zip ties in the hardware.

 

The part that will hinder many from jumping on the P7-C1 Pro would have to be the price. You will find a few upgrades over the P7-C0, externally, internally, in the feature set, and in overall attractiveness to this chassis, and we have no issues there. However, the reality is that Aerocool is asking $164.99 for the P7-C1 Pro. Yes, there are fancy new lights, yes they can be software controlled, yes this case looks awesome, but the mid-tower segment of the market is flooded with $100 options that are doing fantastically well. To ask this sort of price for a case made of steel raises the bar to a higher position for Aerocool, we just hope they have what it takes to convince you that the investment is worth it.

 

 

Chad's Chassis Test System Specifications

 

    PRICING: You can find the product discussed for sale below. The prices listed are valid at the time of writing, but can change at any time. Click the link below to see real-time pricing for the best deal:

     

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    United Kingdom: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon UK`s website.

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