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Raidmax Sigma ATX Tower Chassis Review

Raidmax Sigma ATX Tower Chassis Review
Raidmax's Sigma ATX tower computer case goes under the spotlight today as we see all that it has to offer.
By: Chad Sebring | Full-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jun 14, 2017 1:14 pm
TweakTown Rating: 95%Manufacturer: Raidmax

Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

 

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Raidmax has made it back onto our radar with the Alpha chassis, and even now we are not positive it was their best effort. We would not go as far to say that we were super impressed with the Alpha chassis we recently looked at. However, we feel that everyone can have a bad day, so there is no sense in holding a grudge. Things can, and usually do improve. That being said, we are here today with our eyes wide open, ready to look at what else Raidmax has to offer us.

 

 

Moving forward, we now have a chassis which uses the latest trends to its advantage. In the case we have today, you will find things like tempered glass, use of refined materials like brushed aluminum, and all housed in a chassis designed with a unique aesthetic appeal. This does not mean they put lipstick on the previous design. In fact, this is a whole new look for Raidmax, and when asked to review this chassis, it was the looks that initially sold us to request this sample to be looked at much closer.

 

Now, we bring you to the reason we have you here, the Raidmax Sigma ATX Tower Chassis. Raidmax is about to flip the script from what we have seen, to have us glowing about what you are about to see. Not only is this chassis refined, but its styling is also aggressive, there is modularity built into it, room for water cooling, and LED lighting in all the right places. Forget what we may have said about Raidmax in the past, as it takes just one case to be a hit, and we feel the Sigma is that chassis for Raidmax.

 

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In the chart which is provided on the Raidmax Sigma webpage, we see that this chassis comes with a choice of a black version, or another in white, both using a mix of steel, brushed metal inserts, mesh inserts and ABS plastic. The Sigma stands 518mm tall, it is 214mm wide, and it is 489mm deep, with no mention of its weight, but we did read elsewhere that it is nineteen pounds. Neither chassis comes with any external drive bays, but on the inside, they can hold a pair of 2.5" drives behind the motherboard tray, a single 3.5" drive can be installed on the floor, and there is a cage that accepts a pair of either 2.5" or 3.5" drives. The motherboard tray will fit a Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, or an ATX motherboard, and at the back of the Sigma, there are seven expansion slots. The front I/O panel offers USB 3.0 ports and HD Audio jacks and is also where the power button, reset button, and HDD activity LED is as well. The chassis is not so restrictive either. The CPU cooler can be 180mm in height, the video cards can be 400mm long, and there is modularity to allow for very long power supplies.

 

Cooling inside of this chassis has a few options to choose. The front of the chassis can take three 120mm fans or a pair of 140mm fans. The sides of the chassis offer no cooling options, but at the back of the chassis there is a 140mm blue LED fan placed in that location, but you can trade it out for a 120mm fan too. The top of the chassis offers room for a pair of either 120mm or 140mm fans, but the floor of the chassis has no locations for additional cooling. Water cooling support matches the fan layouts. The front of the chassis can take a 360mm or 280mm radiator, while the top can use another 280mm but only a 240mm radiator due to the location of the front I/O panel. The back of the chassis can also house a radiator, and it can be either 120mm in size or 140mm.

 

Restrictions are not even that restrictive, but we will cover them. The CPU cooler can be up to 180mm in height that covers a ton of air cooling options out there. They mention the VGA length at 278mm with the HDD cage in, but this only applies to the lower cards. With the HDD cage removed, all slots have 420mm of room there. Last is the mention of the PSU. If you plan to fill the floor with fans or water cooling, you need to keep the PSU to 180mm or less. If not, there is room for 220mm of PSU until you run into the raised section on the floor. Lastly, we are provided a list of all of the past and currently offered Corsair Hydro series coolers that will fit inside of this chassis.

 

The Sigma is aggressively styled, it comes with a tempered glass side panel, and is a design that will be admired by many. So, when it came time to look around at the pricing, we were not surprised to see what the Sigma is selling for currently. The price is still well below the $100 mark that is the typical glass ceiling for this size of chassis, and we are pleased to tell you, you will not have to dig quite that deep to obtain the Sigma. Whether looking for the white version, or the black version we have for you now, you are asked to shell out $79.99. This is across the board pricing, as nearly everywhere we looked, this is the going rate for the Sigma, and we feel the pricing is justified.

 

 

Chad's Chassis Test System Specifications

 

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