TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review

TEAM dropped the T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB liquid CPU cooler with m.2 SSD cooling, and we found it to be more than we ever expected.

Published
Updated
Manufacturer: TEAM / T-Force
14 minutes & 26 seconds read time
TweakTown's Rating: 88%

The Bottom Line

The T-FORCE DUO360 RGB is a solid CPU cooler, and an amazing SSD cooler. However, even with all the bells and whistles that come in the box, the cost and short warranty will likely scare away potential customers.

Pros

  • + Compatibility
  • + RAM clearance
  • + Slick RGB implementation
  • + m.2 cooling

Cons

  • - Fan noise
  • - Cost and warranty
  • - Availability

Should you buy it?

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Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 99

The fact that we just looked at the Siren GA360 from T-Force not only sets the performance bar but should give us an idea of what to expect with the more equipped version. However, we need to get some things out in the open. Even though most of the name is the same for the two coolers, they are not made by the same OEM. Where the first we looked at was an Asetek unit, we are almost certain that our version now is an Apeltek cooler. Not only that but there is also a vast discrepancy in cost and warranty coverage. In other words, throw everything you know of the Siren GA360 RGB out the window. We are starting with something completely different.

Our latest submission is a large AIO with all the bells and whistles the users want from the market, but TEAM added a cooling block to this unit. Not only will it keep your CPU chilly under load, but they have added a block to cover 2280 m.2 drives. While earlier m.2s may not need such cooling, we can tell you that the newest Gen 5 devices can get quite toasty while used, and to get the best performance from such devices, you need to keep them under a thermal threshold, or they will throttle. With this new CPU cooler and m.2 cooler arrangement, both items are taken care of, with little to do from the customer to enjoy the benefits.

Even though we feel that the Siren GA360 RGB set the stage for what we are about to see, almost everything possible has been changed. Different hardware, a different color, and the RGB delivery differ in the head unit. Although the fans are the same, even the radiator has been changed. With the many changes afoot in the latest example of a T-Force Siren CPU cooler, the m.2 block will make anyone look at this over something else. You may be as impressed as we are with its capabilities, but is it worth the investment and hassle?

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 01

Using the product page and packaging to cobble this chart together, we see more to discuss than we saw in the GA360 compared to the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB. Compatibility has been improved over the first cooler, as TEAM now offers support for LGA 115x/1200, 1700, 2011 (v3), and 2066 for Intel users. AMD support covers AM2 and up and even covers FM1 and FM2.

The next bit is the most important part of this AIO, where TEAM covers the addition of m.2 2280 SSD coverage from a water block. This block measures 78mm long, stands 58mm tall, and is 23.6mm wide. As with their other blocks, this uses a copper plate to transfer heat, while the rest of the block is made of aluminum. You also have an optional lighting module that is magnetically attached to the top of the SSD block.

We then bump into the radiator, which is shown to be made of aluminum and measures 396mm long. It is 120mm wide and 27mm thick. Unlike our previous model, the pump is fitted into the radiator, not the head unit. The pump will spin at 4000 RPM powered by a 3-pin fan header, drawing 0.34A and 4.08W, delivering 22 dB(A) into the room. We last noticed that the pump flow remains at 850 ml/min.

The Siren GA360 and Siren DUO 360 use the same fans, but along with the rest of the DUO360, this time, everything is white. These 120mm fans boast 70.7 CFM and 3.88 mmH2O of pressure from the 2200 RPM cap. These 4-pin powered fans will draw 4.2W a piece, for a total of 16.68W to power the cooler.

With the additional block, we now have three hoses. There is one from the CPU block to the radiator at 430mm. The one from the CPU block to the m.2 cooler is 230mm long, while the one from the m.2 block to the radiator is 400mm long. They still include a splitter cable for the RGB, but rather than a five-year warranty, the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB is only covered for two.

There are still two hurdles before getting the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB to your door. The first is limited availability. While we were able to locate it at Newegg, it is currently out of stock, and Amazon shows no listing for it at all. Even if you can find one, you must nearly empty your funds to obtain it. While there is nothing besides eBay listing over the $400 mark, we know that the MSRP is not far off that mark, as TEAM introduced these devices at $399.99. That being said, while the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB is impressive, we are unsure if twice the going rate can be offset with what should be a $50 addition.

Buy at Amazon

TEAMGROUP T-FORCE Siren GD360E AIO

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$124.53$124.53$124.99
Buy at Newegg
-
--$174.99
* Prices last scanned on 5/20/2024 at 5:35 am CDT - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Packaging

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 02

The T-Force Siren DUO 360 RGB comes in a matte black box, with the bright white cooler taking up much of the front of the packaging. We see things like the latest socket compatibility, the various sync methods, and the two-year warranty notification.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 03

The panel on the right of the box shows us all the components in the loop with dimensions around them. There is the CPU block at the top, and the m.2 block comes next, with the radiator and fans at the bottom.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 04

The longer side panels are matte black, with only the T-Force name and logo.

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The back notes key features of the Siren DUO360 RGB, which uses most of the panel. Across the bottom, we see this is not a low-noise product, but it has powerful flow, enhanced tubing, and includes RGB in the blocks and fans. On the right is TEAM's legal information and an indication that the unit inside is white, as we see on the box.

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The last of the panels delivers a set of specifications identical to what we covered above. Everything you need to know, including specs, measurements, and visual appeal, is on the box to ensure the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB will fit your needs.

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Dense foam surrounds the components and hardware, this time with a layer over the top, ensuring everything inside gets a safe journey to your door. In this instance, there are no signs of damage to the box or what is inside, and the multiple plastic bags and layer of cardboard on the radiator make it nearly impossible not to arrive in perfect condition as ours did.

TEAM T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB CPU Cooler

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 08

The CPU block is made externally of white plastic, with a translucent cap on top sporting the T-Force logo in gray. At the bottom is the C-Style Intel mounting bracket pre-installed on the block, and near the RAM is where the ninety-degree swivel fittings are, with the white braided tube coming from them. We haven't shown a tiny 4-pin port at the top side, which is how the RGB component is powered and controlled.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 09

The copper plate is machined well enough that you have to zoom in to find any markings. The base is convex and comes without thermal paste applied, but it ships with a plastic sticker we have already removed.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 10

We run into the SSD block after 230mm of tubing from the CPU block. The block covering is white and says T-Force on the top, while the part that faces the chassis window says T-Force Siren, again with gray paint. In front of the block is the RGB module, which sports the T-Force logo on top and will cover the T-Force Siren biot when magnetically attached.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 11

This combination is what we meant by our last comment. Once combined, the block is taller but now sports more RGB lighting. Of course, you get more swivel fittings to help with fitment and how the tubes run to each component.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 12

The base of the SSD block gets the same treatment as the CPU block with its finish, but this block is mostly flat and level. However, the DUO360 uses a thermal pad between this and the drive, so its surface treatment is above what is needed.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 13

The tubing between the CPU block and the radiator is said to be 430mm in length, which is nearly seventeen inches, but we see less than sixteen here. Fitment is still easy with gentle bends in the tube, but ours ended up much shorter somewhere along the line than the specs say.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 14

While we were close, we thought it was a perfect time to show the pump. In this unit, the pump takes up real estate in the radiator but is mostly behind the dead zone of the fans. The cable from it is white and terminates in a 3-pin header, meaning it runs at full speed all the time.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 15

We can tell from the sticker that this is not an Asetek unit, but we wanted to show the TB140602 model number and where the serial number is located.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 16

As with the GA360, the Siren DUO360 RGB sports the T-Force name on one side of the radiator with applied metal stickers.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 17

The rest of the radiator goes along with the theme, even the fins. The fins are arranged with a high FPI count, and we got to 23 FPI when picking a random area.

Accessories and Documentation

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 18

In this image of some of the hardware, we run across the LGA1700 backplate at the left, with the standard universal Intel backplate in the middle. Above it are the LGA2033/2066 standoffs, while the set below is for LGA1700. To the right is the AMD C-Style mounting clip, and we placed the latches to mount the bracket inside it.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 19

Here, we see the studs used with the universal Intel sockets at the left. Next is a set of spacers that go above the board on the studs, while the washers are used to isolate the metal Intel backplate. On the right are the spring-loaded nuts, which are used for all sockets to secure the mounting bracket to the rest of the hardware attached to the motherboard.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 20

To help mount the radiator, TEAM supplied us with twelve short screws for securing the radiator to the chassis. The twelve long screws at the right are used to secure the trio of fans to the radiator. No washers are needed for either set.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 21

Most of this is for the 2280 m.2 SSD setup. On the left is the surrounding bracket to hold the m.2. There are three Velcro straps for wiring and tubing, a thin screwdriver for the screws to the right of it, and a thermal pad for SSD cooling. We also added the small tube of thermal paste supplied by TEAM, which is good for a couple of application attempts.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 22

TEAM also ensures you have all the wiring needed to get the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB all set up and running, no matter how many headers the motherboard has. With a 3-way RGB splitter cable, you only require one open header on the motherboard or controller. There is the cable that powers and controls the RGB of the CPU block and a Molex to 4-pin fan adapter for those wanting the fans to run at full speed. We also get a 3-way Y-splitter cable to power all three fans from a single motherboard header.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 23

As for the fans, they share the model number with those seen in the GA360, but this time everything is white. These use the same seven-blade configuration with all blades connected around the frame. The leads for power and RGB are longer than most and will simplify connectivity.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 24

The manual starts with all parts shown with a corresponding letter, which is used as the multiple socket instructions are delivered. Once the cooler is installed, the manual covers the wiring, ensuring you get the most from the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB you paid so much for.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 25

One last component was shipped along with the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB, which is this T-Force Z540 solid-state drive. This two-terabyte drive fills the 2280 requirement, and being a Gen 5 device, it is sure to pour on the heat, allowing us to get a good sense of what the Siren DUO360 RGB is capable of.

Installation and Finished Product

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 26

The T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB setup is a bit more expansive than with other AIOs, but we managed to prep for what we have without much hassle. Typically, we explain that we must remove the factory hardware, but with this model, we need it in place for the latches to have something to grab. We also had to remove the chipset fan cover plate and the motherboard heatsink, regularly covering our m.2 slot.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 27

After some mounting and wiring, we ended up with an AIO that brilliantly stands out against all of the black and has an extra cooler that the GPU would block sight of from this angle. After securely mounting the blocks and the radiator, there were many cables to tend to, but the splitter cables came in handy. We also followed the instructions, using two Velcro straps to hold the tubes together near the SSD block and keeping the two longer tubes together.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 28

As we step back to take in the completed build, the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB stands out, but the polished metal lettering on the radiator also pops on top of that. The logos on these blocks are hard to see using gray on white, as there is little contrast, and once powered, unless very close, you will hardly see them at all. All we have left to do is power this thing up and see the appeal of the RGB.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 29

As with the GA360, our T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB shines brighter than many other solutions. Not only does it add a glow of color to the office, but with the addition of an SSD block, the GPU is flooded with light, and you have one more area of smooth blends and color changes to appreciate over many other offerings.

Test System Setup, Thermal Tests, and Noise Results

Chad's CPU Cooler Test System Specifications

  • Motherboard: ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII HERO [Wi-Fi] (AMD X570) - Buy from Amazon
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600X - Buy from Amazon
  • Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 4000MHz 4X8GB
  • Graphics Card: ASUS GeForce RTX 2060 6GB OC - Buy from Amazon
  • Storage: Galax HOF Pro M.2 1TB SSD
  • Case: Hydra Bench Standard
  • Power Supply: ASUS ROG Thor 850W - Buy from Amazon
  • OS: Microsoft Windows 10 Home 64-bit - Buy from Amazon
  • Software: AMD Ryzen Master, AIDA64 Engineer 6.25.5400, and CPU-z 1.92.0 x64

To see our testing methodology and to find out what goes into making our charts, please refer to our 2020 CPU Cooler Testing and Methodology article for more information.

Thermal Results

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Almost a degree behind the Siren GA360 is not too shabby. The extra tube, the flow reduction, the pump location, and an additional block do not seem to take them much further from the top of our chart. At 56.5°C stock, TEAM is in fifteenth place overall and is only 2.4°C from the best in our chart.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 31

Applying an overclock leaves the Siren DUO360 RGB a single degree behind the GA360 and again sits in fifteenth place. At 63.3°C, we are at a 2.6°C gap from first place. Again, there is nothing to complain about when looking at thermal results.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 32

TEAM has tuned the PWM profile better in the Siren DUO360 RGB. With the fans allowed to run at full speed, we gained only half a degree of headroom. However, a ton of noise comes with this half of a degree in this test.

Noise Level Results

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 33

39 dB is a loud start to the audio charts, but the fans were spinning slightly faster than when we tested the GA360. At this point, when testing the stock CPU load, the fans, while controlled by PWM, turn at 1254 RPM to keep the CPU and SSD cooled. However, the pump is nowhere near as loud this time, which is a pleasant surprise.

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 34

As we added more CPU heat to the system, the noise increased to the 47 dB we show in this chart. The trio of fans are now turning at 1405 RPM, slightly more than we saw with the GA360, but again, there is more to cool.

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While one might assume, with the same fans, the upper echelon of the noise range would match, and it should. However, with the GA360 fans turned at 2028 RPM, the Siren DUO360 RGB fans have a little more to them and topped out at 2136 RPM while allowed to spin as fast as possible.

T-Force Z540 Thermal Results

TEAM T-FORCE Siren DUO360 RGB Liquid CPU Cooler Review 36

Since the Siren DUO 360 RGB cools two components, testing the drive in many conditions is only proper. Starting at the bottom, we can see that without any cooling, we reached 84°C and saw the drive throttling in Crystal Disk. The next result is the factory heatsink under load, where the drive peaked at 56°C. Not great, but not throttling. The open-air idling of the Z540 left us at 48°C idle, which is why boards come with heatsinks in the first place. The last result before we get to the DUO360 is the heatsink-cooled Z540 while idling at 37°C. We are now to the best part, where we used the Siren DUO360 RGB for what it was designed and found the same drive idling at 27°C with the maximum load temp getting to only 36°C, proving its mettle and ability to give us the coolest temps possible with what we had on hand.

Final Thoughts

As an AIO, we cannot complain about the thermal performance of the Siren DUO360 RGB from TEAM. As close to the GA360 RGB as the DUO is, it is impressive to us. Not only did they switch manufacturers, but they added another block into the mix, and with everything that goes along with something that simple, the flow rate and cooling capabilities were not hindered much. To get into the top ten coolers, even the top twenty in our chart, is no accident. You have to go balls out sometimes to get the reputation you are looking for, and as long as silence isn't mandatory, this is a serious contender for your cooling needs.

Even regarding SSD cooling, the Siren DUO360 RGB showed it is up for the task. We realize we hadn't mentioned if either device affects the other, but here we go for the big news. If you run Crystal Dick on the drive when the CPU idles, you raise the CPU temperature an astounding 0.3°C, that is all. If we go the other way around and load the CPU while the drive is almost idle (used as the OS drive), the temperature does not change on our Z540. Even with everything loaded at once, both the CPU test going and adding in Crystal Dick on top of it, we still never saw temps for the T-Force Z540 to go beyond 36°C, which is a touch less than we saw it idle when installed as the motherboard manufacturer suggests.

The lighting is impressive, and the blends and color shifts are smooth. We loved that the CPU block is quieter, as the pump is moved to the radiator and drowned out by the fans while idle. A ton of noise comes from this CPU/SSD cooling solution, and with the way the PWM curve is set, at least TEAM saves you from ever needing to push near max on the fans. With the fans, CPU block, and SSD block all aglow, it is hard not to like Siren DUO360 RGB, and being bold and white doesn't hurt it either.

As much as we like what we see, there are still those huge hurdles you must jump. If we want to buy the T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB, we have no choice but to use eBay, which has a listing of over $400. The $399.99 MSRP that TEAM has set confuses us because we can get a 240mm version without the SSD block for around $125. Math being math, essentially, it is another $275 for an extra 120mm worth of radiator, an extra tube, a couple more fittings, and an RGB SSD block. That seems like overkill for what you get. While they may be one of the only companies with such a product, we feel they are reaching when asking this amount. Even with the limited availability making this cooler as rare as a hen's tooth, we have difficulty justifying the cost.

On top of those factors, we want you to know that the Siren GA360 and the Siren DUO360 are not the same breed. They do not share the same OEM, which leads us to the last bit. For $400, we would expect a much longer warranty, much like we get with the GA360, but at two years length, it is almost laughable that we are expected to pay double or more of the market value to keep your SSD a bit cooler than what we get with the motherboard already. Impressive as the results are, we feel that possibly at $300, many would bite, but at $400, this will be a tough road for TEAM to travel with their T-Force Siren DUO360 RGB.

Performance

93%

Quality

99%

Features

100%

Value

60%

Overall

88%

The Bottom Line

The T-FORCE DUO360 RGB is a solid CPU cooler, and an amazing SSD cooler. However, even with all the bells and whistles that come in the box, the cost and short warranty will likely scare away potential customers.

88%

TEAMGROUP T-FORCE Siren GD360E AIO

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$124.53$124.53$124.99
Buy at Newegg
-
--$174.99
* Prices last scanned on 5/20/2024 at 5:35 am CDT - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Chad joined the TweakTown team in 2009 and has since reviewed 100s of new techy items. After a year of gaming, Chad caught the OC bug. With overclocking comes the need for better cooling, and Chad has had many air and water setups. With a few years of abusing computer parts, he decided to take his chances and try to get a review job. As an avid overclocker, Chad is always looking for the next leg up in RAM and coolers.

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