One-quarter of stars like our Sun end up eating their own planets

An international team of astronomers has published a study that suggests a quarter of Sunlike stars end up eating their planets.

@JakConnorTT
Published Mon, Sep 6 2021 2:33 AM CDT   |   Updated Thu, Sep 30 2021 8:27 PM CDT

Researchers have been attempting to answer the question of "is our solar system a rare one?" for quite some time.

One-quarter of stars like our Sun end up eating their own planets 06 | TweakTown.com

Researchers have discovered that planetary systems are scattered throughout the universe, but not all of them are as calm as the one we live in.

Lorenzo Spina, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, and formerly Research Fellow, Monash University, wrote in The Conversation that a new study from him and his team of researchers explores the possibility of being able to narrow down the search for possible habitable worlds by identifying solar systems that have a similar peaceful past to our solar system.

Spina mentions that the researchers know our solar system is calm by measuring the stable orbit of planets around the Sun. With this in mind, the astronomers observed many exo-solar systems, and according to the results published in Nature Astronomy, between 20% and 30% of Sun-like stars end up eating the planets in their local system. Spina says that the "most likely figure being 27%" of Sun-like stars eat their own planets.

For more information on this story, check out this link here.

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Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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