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BitFenix Survivor Mid Tower Chassis (Page 5)

By Chad Sebring on Nov 9, 2010 10:34 pm CST
Rating: 94%Manufacturer: BitFenix

Inside The BitFenix Survivor Mid Tower Case

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I already removed the cover at the top of the chassis, and am in the process of removing the bottom section. All it takes is the removal of a pair of Phillips head screws found in the bottom of two long holes. Once these are out of the way you can access the interior of the chassis, or for security sake, you see what someone would have to go through to steal your components.

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With the lower section of the SoftTouch coated plastic we also gain access to the dust filter. While it may physically come out with the outer plastic trim in place, I found no way to get a hold of it to try to pull it out.

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With the panels out of the way we can get an idea of what the inside looks like and offers us to work with. Strapped to the hard drive racks I found a white box with all the hardware and goodies you will need to truly enjoy using the Survivor.

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The top section of hard drives is removable to allow for longer VGAs to be installed inside. The lower section is riveted to the floor, and not removable. Each tray in the racks will accept 2.5" drives with screws through the bottom of the drives. To use them with 3.5" drives you just stretch the tray around the drive and slide the tray back into the rack.

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The motherboard tray has a very large CPU access hole and should offer compatibility with any setup. At the very top and down the right side you will find holes to run all the various wiring. Along with punched out wire tie loops and a large hole near the PSU, wire management is very well addressed.

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Looking up in the top of the Survivor you can see how well he 200mm fan can still breathe even with the handle blocking a large bit of the exiting airflow, but still offers enough room for sufficient flow from the fan. At the right you can see where all the wiring connects to the PCBs. With all the wiring involved it will take a bit of tucking to use the top optical bay without running into this wiring.

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There is a bunch of wiring that goes along with the Survivor. At the left there are 4-pin Molex connections to power the USB 3.0 and the fan power. These along with a couple of 3-pin headers and some connections to use with the fan controller are what are bunched on the left. The twisted, colored groups of wiring will make for all of you motherboard connectivity. To the right there is the USB 2.0, audio, eSATA, and the pair of USB 3.0 cables round out the wiring.

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Behind the tray you will find over 20mm of space for your wiring, and I found it very easy to run the 24-pin wire and bunching other groups of wiring is not a problem. With all the tie spots and the management holes, it results in a very clean looking build.

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At the bottom of the chassis, behind the motherboard tray, you will find this fan controller. Looking at their website I found there is a specific way to plug in the fan controller and the switch wiring. Make sure you refer to the instructions when you attempt to use this connection.

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Chad Sebring

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Chad Sebring

Jumping into computers for just the aspect of gaming is how it all started for me. After a solid year of gaming, I caught the overclocking bug. With overclocking comes the need for better cooling, and I have had both air and water setups to tinker with. With a few years of abusing computer parts, I looked for something new. I then decided to take my chances and try to get a review job with a online site. As an avid overclocker, I am always looking for the next leg up in RAM, cooling, as well as peripherals technology.

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