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Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review

Kingston's new FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB dual-channel RAM kit ticks many of the right boxes, but is let down by its asking price.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit
Published Nov 10, 2022 9:20 AM CST
Manufacturer: Kingston (KF560C32RSK2-32)
11 minute read time
TweakTown's Rating: 90%

The Bottom Line

A third more cost than anything similar to it. Even with the impressive visual appeal and performance we saw, there isn't enough here to warrant the cost, and it is a shame, as otherwise, we would have fully recommended the FURY Renegade from Kingston.

Pros

  • + Brushed aluminum heat spreaders
  • + Screwed together heat spreaders
  • + PMIC has thermal pad
  • + Overclockability

Cons

  • - No A/RGB
  • - Cost

Should you buy it?

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Introduction, Specifications, and Pricing

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 99

The last set of DDR5 to come across our desk from Kingston went off well. While the competition was limited to a couple of other DDR5 kits, and we still showed DDR4 results, the FURY BEAST we had, did rather well. Performance was there, and styling was great, but the one thing holding us back from a full recommendation is down to the fact that Kingston demands a large premium to join their team. In most instances, the entry fee is worth it in the end, but we have a slightly different perspective these days, with many more current additions to our charts.

Sticking within the FURY family of DDR5, Kingston decided to go with something completely different regarding visual appeal. Rather than something more akin to what you might find on a firearm, cutouts, angles, and linear embossed designs, all remind us of the side of a gun. Similar to what we saw from Patriot and their Viper Venom, Kingston has decided to also opt into the black and silver appeal, but rather than paint or anodization of the brightwork, Kingston has decided to brush that bit of aluminum. Along with that is more aggressive styling that will appeal to many.

What we have for you today is a brand new set of Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5. If what we saw with the BEAST, is anything to base an opinion on, we have hopes that Kingston has delivered enough with their attention to small details and the performance to help offset that super high price tag. We know at this point that we have some stellar-looking sticks we want to test and clock the snot out of, so let's get to it.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 01

Our two-stick set of KF560C32RSK2-32 from Kingston is the FURY Renegade 6000 MHz CAS 32 kit with some of the best timings we have seen in an XMP profile. You may also find these listed as FURY Renegade Silver, but it is the same set of DDR5. The heat spreaders are made of aluminum, and while black is the main background color of this kit, the brushed aluminum plates added to them cover more of the surface area. Along with the brushed aluminum, we also found machined, exposed aluminum for the name and a bit of white paint for other things.

We mentioned the CAS and the speed, but on closer inspection, not only do we start at CAS32, the secondaries are not set to 40 either. We see a tRAS of 80 rather than 78 or 76, but still using a 2T command rate. Kingston did not need a ton of volts, as the XMP profile sets VDIMM to 1.35V, even with the additional tweaking of those timings.

Size-wise, these sticks are not huge and will fit without issue in most systems. They are 133.6mm long, just longer than the PCB. They stand 38.5mm tall, which is good for anyone using air cooling on the CPU, and they are 8mm thick, which helps eat up some of the space between the DIMM slots. Each stick in the kit weighs 45.2 grams a piece and is backed with a limited lifetime warranty.

We made sure upfront to mention cost, as it is the hardest hurdle to vault without knowing much else about the Kingston FURY Renegade. To add perspective, to get a standard set of 6000MHz sticks with 32GB of density, things start at around $170, and that is for a set of TridentZ 5 RAM. However, these are not some average CAS40 sticks everyone is selling, so we condensed the list to anything at CAS 32, and we found that those start at around $210, and again it is a kit of G.Skill selling at that low-end of the price spectrum.

However, to get ahold of the Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 we have in hand, you are asked to shell out $316.99, and that price matches whether you are on Amazon or the Kinston Store. This bit alone, with a near $100 premium over the direct competition, raises the bar very high for Kingston; we hope Kingston can overcome this.

Buy at Amazon

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$263.30$263.30$334.80
* Prices last scanned on 12/8/2022 at 4:21 pm CST - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Packaging and Kingston FURY Renegade

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 02

Kingston differentiates itself with this bright packaging using mostly white with red and black accents. It is marked as DDR5, where Kingston FURY Renegade follows. Above the image of one stick in the box, we see the speed and density, while at the bottom are notations that this RAM is suited for both AMD and Intel rigs.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 03

After giving the box a spin, we see the back, in which the top half is used to say that this is high-performance memory above a top-down view of the Renegades installed in four slots. The middle offers the name again, and Kingston used the bottom to note free tech support and where to find warranty information while providing the product sticker to the right.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 04

Inside the box, you will find your FURY Renegade well-protected in clamshell packaging made of clear plastic. We also found some literature on the warranty and installation process and a sticker, both floating free outside the plastic. With little visual damage to the cardboard, our Kingston kit is in perfect condition and ready for its closeups.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 05

Without the plastic and light refraction to skew the view, we can now appreciate these black and aluminum sticks in all their glory. Kingston and DDR5 are painted white, while Renegade is done in black, but the FURY name is cut to expose the aluminum for added pop. We like the wing-like tops and the fact that they are not too big, and the design being mimicked by the brushed aluminum makes them that much more special visually.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 06

The text is removed in favor of the product sticker, but the same brushed aluminum plate is found on both sides. On the sticker, you can find the part number and required voltage.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 07

Spaced like they would be on a motherboard typically, we love that we can see the aluminum poking out behind the stick in front. We would also like to draw your attention to the top corners, where Kingston has pressed nuts into the heat spreader, which work with screws that go through the other side.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 08

Looking at the top of the sticks, we can see the body line running down the center, but it is offset in the middle to allow more room to print the FURY name. The wing tips are open, so any airflow around the RAM could help with cooling, but in our testing, they were not hot enough to need actively cooled.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 09

Like Patriot, Kingston opts to use a thermal pad on the PMIC to help keep it as cool as possible. The ICs are covered with dense foam tape, and while we are not experts in thermal dynamics, it seems almost insulative.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 10

As many are, Kingston uses the SK Hynix H5CG48MEB0 chips. We know what to expect for these ICs, but the CAS 32 timings are new for us to reach top speed. You can also see some of the foam tape that tore away from the heat spreader, and why I feel it may not be the best for cooling ICs.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 11

Using a thermal pad on the PMIC has erased its paint, so we got the magnifying glasses out, and a flashlight, and what we could make out is the 0D and possibly a 99, but all we know for certain is that this is a Richtek built chip and it is unlocked.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 12

Installed in the APEX, with just two DIMM slots, the gap between them is removed, and we did lose a view of some of that brushed aluminum. However, the aggressive style and the contrast certainly make these sticks stand out in our system's sea of black.

Test System Details

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 13

To obtain the CPU-Z screenshots, you will see directly following this image, and this is the system we used to do it, as well as in attaining the results seen in the following pages. Thanks go out to be quiet, ASUS, and NVIDIA, for supporting this venture. Detailed specifications of the system can be found below.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 14

We will refer to this in the charts as XMP1, as it is the main XMP profile and is what matches the box specifications. The FURY Renegade will post up at 6000 MHz with 32-38-38-80 2T timings. To do so, it requires 1.35 VDIMM, 1.233V for the system agent voltage, and the memory controller used 1.30V.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 15

The second option we will call XMP2, and sets the FURY Renegade to 5600 MHz with looser timings at 40-40-40-80-2T. Much of the benefit here is that the VDIMM drops to 1.25V, the system agent is reduced to 1.137V, and even the memory controller drops to 1.234V.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 16

The third and last profile offered will be shown as XMP3 and has the RAM set slightly better than the SPD profile. Currently, the Renegade is at 4800 MHz, but rather than 40s for timings, it's 38-38-38-70 2T.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 17

Starting with the initial XMP profile and increasing the voltages, we hunted for the lowest possible timings. We made it to CAS 28 with higher secondaries but took the balance of 30-34-34-80 due to instabilities found with CAS 28 and changing the secondaries. To do this, we bumped the VDD, VDDQ, and Tx to 1.45V while using 1.30V for the system agent and 1.35 for the memory controller.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 18

Using the same process and voltages, rather than changing timings, we increased the speed. While we made it to Windows at 6800 MHz, it was in no way stable, so we backed the kit down slightly and regained full stability. Keep in mind, typically, we do this with 40-40-40 timings, and we feel that 6667 MHZ at CAS 32 for an off-the-shelf kit is pretty damn good.

Chad's AMD DDR5 Dual-Channel Test System Specifications

Intel Performance

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 19

It is hard to beat when a kit comes out of the gate charging, and we find that XMP1 delivers the best score and is in second place. Not far behind are the low latency run and the XMP3 score, with the speed run falling slightly short of them both. Very near the bottom is XMP2, which is odd, but then again, so was the XMP3 placement.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 20

Read performance through AIDA64 is what we expected, but we do see that Kingston is ahead of the Lancer at the same speed. XMP2 and XMP3 will be slower, but they still are top in their speed segments. We loved that we could get a slight boost by changing a few timings around, but we got an additional 8162 MB/s from it with little effort.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 21

Following what we just saw, write performance results show the FURY Renegade as class leaders at whatever speed they are running via the XMP profiles. We get a modest boost in bandwidth by lowering the timings, but the gap between XMP1 on the 667 MHz run is an 8162 MB/s one, which is huge.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 22

Even in the copy portion of the testing, the FURY Renegade come up as class leaders when looking at the three XMP bars. Reducing the timings did little to add bandwidth, but that 8552 MB/s boost we get running the kit at 6667 MHz was well worth the effort.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 23

Many say latency is key to a fast set of DDR5, and Kingston is the best of the bunch with the 59.8 nanosecond latency from XMP1. XMP2 and XMP3 results are much less impressive, but we got latency down in the 55ns range with light overclocking.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 24

While some kits may founder with the number crunching of Super Pi, the FURY Renegade stands tall in the chart. There isn't a slower kit ahead of the XMP1 results, and XMP2 is nearly as good. XMP3 kind of failed, but with some tinkering, we could surpass all the other results.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 25

Fire Strike from 3D Mark shows XMP2, and our 6667 MHZ run as the best of the bunch but are more or less average results. A reduction in timings did not help us, and those XMP1 results are pitiful, let alone the XMP3 found dead last.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 26

PCMark 10 appreciates the Kingston sticks, and all three XMP settings landed us in third place. We gained some footing into second by reducing the timings, but we got to the top of the chart with the added speed.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 27

File compression via 7-Zip lands Kingston ahead of others in its class using XMP1. XMP2 lost to the Vulcan, and XMP3 lost to them all. We got nine seconds back option for CAS 30 at 6000 MHz but twenty-one seconds back over XMP1, pushing the speed a bit.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 28

Cinebench results are not great, but they could be worse. XMP1 lost to XMP2 here, and we are glad to see XMP3 off the bottom this time. A reduction in timings wasn't worth squat in this test, but we nearly got to the top, pushing for more speed from the Renegade.

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit Review 29

Ahgndbrake is something we used to use more often, but it is a good metric for anyone who deals with video transcoding. XMP1 results are great and ahead of their class, and a few faster kits. XMP2 and XMP3 results are not great; no way to spin that one. We did get some time back when overclocking this set of DDR5, roughly four seconds at 6000 C30, or a little more than seven seconds, testing at 6667 MHz.

Final Thoughts

As only the second company to fill all of the available XMP slots with "tweaked" settings to choose from, no matter what you may run into, at least you have options to work with to try to sort out what is going on. While many may never even look beyond the initial XMP setting, the one that matched the specifications, and we get that. However, it takes time to bin chips for a wideset profile as what is offered, and it also takes more time to program three slots versus just one. What is more important here is that while dealing with XMP settings, these are the first sticks to not default to 40-40-40-whatever. Kingston opted for a much more aggressive profile with 32-38-38-80 2T timings, and only twice did it not do what we expected of it.

Speaking of its performance, we cannot deny all the times we typed class-leading in the comments to a chart. Largely based on the timings as to where XMP1 excels, but the much looser profiles of XMP2 and 3, with their ability to still lead their respective packs, is something we did not expect to be so regular. On top of that, we saw extraordinary gains when overclocking in many tests. While it is not a major factor in our points system, it does go a long way toward adding some value to this product.

It is odd, but we may have saved the best for last, at least last, before we get to the cost. Styling on the FURY Renegade is something we thoroughly enjoy. The black portion behind the brushed aluminum adds depth we are not used to seeing, and the bold chunky design is something we like more every time we see it. They are not too big for most situations, yet when exposed, they add a bunch of style and flair to the build. The only thing that would make this visual package better would be RGB, but Kingston has those if it is the deal breaker for you with this set of FURY Renegade.

As much as we love the style and how well they performed, we still are uncertain if the added cost is worth it. Many DDR5 kits will do similar to what we got from this Kingston FURY Renegade, at least if you are willing to tinker. The XMP profile does deliver tighter timings than most, but even there, compared to its direct competition, that additional $100 is a hard pill to swallow. Requiring $316.99 to get these into the hands of the masses is going to be the hurdle limiting sales of the FURY Renegade DDR5. As much as we like what we have here, we would likely put that $100 somewhere else if it were our money.

Buy at Amazon

Performance

98%

Quality

100%

Features

94%

Value

66%

Overall

90%

The Bottom Line

A third more cost than anything similar to it. Even with the impressive visual appeal and performance we saw, there isn't enough here to warrant the cost, and it is a shame, as otherwise, we would have fully recommended the FURY Renegade from Kingston.

90%

Kingston FURY Renegade DDR5-6000 32GB Dual-Channel Memory Kit

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$263.30$263.30$334.80
* Prices last scanned on 12/8/2022 at 4:21 pm CST - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Chad joined the TweakTown team in 2009 and has since reviewed 100s of new techy items. After a year of gaming, Chad caught the OC bug. With overclocking comes the need for better cooling, and Chad has had many air and water setups. With a few years of abusing computer parts, he decided to take his chances and try to get a review job. As an avid overclocker, Chad is always looking for the next leg up in RAM and coolers.

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