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Tesla slaps down 'sudden acceleration' petition to recall 500,000 cars

Tesla has said that the complaints regarding unintended acceleration in their vehicles are false

By Jak Connor on Jan 22, 2020 04:36 am CST - 2 mins, 24 secs reading time

A few days ago, reports began surfacing regarding Tesla's vehicles and random unintended acceleration. This eventuated into a petition that could result in Tesla recalling 500,000 vehicles.

Tesla slaps down 'sudden acceleration' petition to recall 500,000 cars | TweakTown.com

An investigation is currently being conducted by the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in regard to a petition that claims Tesla's cars are suddenly unintentionally accelerating. The reports are claiming that multiple Tesla's are affected by this issue. Example cars are as follows; Model S produced between 2012 and 2019, Model X produced between 2016 and 2019, and Model 3 produced between 2018 and 2019.

At the moment, the petition says that 127 consumers have made complaints about this issue. The petition also says that these unintended sudden accelerations could have been a contributing factor in 110 crashes and 52 injuries. Since the petition is being investigated by the NHTSA, Tesla has responded to the claims, saying "This petition is completely false and was brought by a Tesla short-seller. We investigate every single incident where the driver alleges to us that their vehicle accelerated contrary to their input, and in every case where we had the vehicle's data, we confirmed that the car operated as designed".

If you are interested in Tesla's full statement it can be found below:

"This petition is completely false and was brought by a Tesla short-seller. We investigate every single incident where the driver alleges to us that their vehicle accelerated contrary to their input, and in every case where we had the vehicle's data, we confirmed that the car operated as designed. In other words, the car accelerates if, and only if, the driver told it to do so, and it slows or stops when the driver applies the brake.

While accidents caused by a mistaken press of the accelerator pedal have been alleged for nearly every make/model of vehicle on the road, the accelerator pedals in Model S, X and 3 vehicles have two independent position sensors, and if there is any error, the system defaults to cut off motor torque. Likewise, applying the brake pedal simultaneously with the accelerator pedal will override the accelerator pedal input and cut off motor torque, and regardless of the torque, sustained braking will stop the car. Unique to Tesla, we also use the Autopilot sensor suite to help distinguish potential pedal misapplications and cut torque to mitigate or prevent accidents when we're confident the driver's input was unintentional. Each system is independent and records data, so we can examine exactly what happened.

We are transparent with NHTSA, and routinely review customer complaints of unintended acceleration with them. Over the past several years, we discussed with NHTSA the majority of the complaints alleged in the petition. In every case we reviewed with them, the data proved the vehicle functioned properly."

Jak Connor

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Jak Connor

Jaks love for technology and more specifically PC gaming began at 10 years old, it was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on a old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of the typical FPS PC gamer, Jak enjoys the likes of a solid MMO, RPG, or a single-player linear story. More importantly, though, he holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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