TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,139 Reviews & Articles | 39,460 News Posts
Weekly Giveaway: Win an Antec Case, PSU and Cooler (Global Entry!)

Mionix Naos 7000 Optical Gaming Mouse Review

Mionix Naos 7000 Optical Gaming Mouse Review
If the previous two Mionix mice looked good, but you really have the desire for an optical sensor; the new Naos 7000 has that covered.
| Mice in Peripherals | Posted: Jan 21, 2014 2:00 pm
TweakTown Rating: 96%Manufacturer: Mionix

Introduction

 

TweakTown image content/6/0/6019_99_mionix_naos_7000_optical_gaming_mouse_review.jpg

 

While we were fans of the Naos 8200 and Avior 8200 mice that Mionix had sent over, there are a lot of gamers out there who would pass up on them for one simple reason: the laser sensor built into them. Most gamers (specifically those at more competitive levels) will tell you that an optical sensor in a mouse will offer better accuracy, and smoother movement than what most laser sensor based mice deliver. Also, it used to be that when looking into optical sensor based mice, the DPI, or the amount of movement the mouse translated to on the screen, capped out pretty low. With advances in the newer optical sensors on the market today, you can go all out and have the same levels of uncontrollability that laser sensors have offered for years.

 

This is what brings us together today. Mionix has taken the Naos 8200, and reworked things slightly, both inside and out. Internally, there are a couple of obvious changes like the PCB color, and the type of sensor used. Externally, the design has been somewhat streamlined, and this newest release lacks the DPI LEDs that are on the left of the Naos 8200.

 

Mionix has kept all of the best parts that made us like the Naos 8200 originally, things like comfort, the software, fully customizable LED coloration, and top end components, to give users a pleasurable time when using these Naos mice.

 

Today, we are getting in depth and personal with the Naos 7000 from Mionix. As we mentioned, the main advantage here is that movement is now tracked with a different Avago sensor, and as the name alludes to, there is up to 7000 DPI selectable for use. I say we just dig right in, and see if the new Naos 7000 is all that the 8200 was, and if there is any real discernible differences between the two.

Related Tags

Further Reading: Read and find more Peripherals content at our Peripherals reviews, guides and articles index page.

Do you get our RSS feed? Get It!

Got an opinion on this content? Post a comment below!

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases