Lenovo Legion Go Review

The Lenovo Legion Go redefines gaming with superb on-the-go PC-quality performance in a dedicated, well-optimized, and fantastically designed package.

Published
Manufacturer: Lenovo
14 minutes & 1 second read time
TweakTown's Rating: 90%
TweakTown award

The Bottom Line

The Legion Go's brilliant screen, unique controllers, and decent performance makes it a must-have for portable enthusiasts.

Pros

  • + Decent on-the-go performance
  • + Fantastic controllers
  • + Vivid, large screen
  • + Quick-launch UI buttons are convenient

Cons

  • - Software and driver issues
  • - Minor gripes with UI/OS

Should you buy it?

AvoidConsiderShortlistBuy

Intro

  • Manufacturer - Lenovo
  • Release Date - October 31, 2023
  • MSRP - $699 (512GB model), $749 (1TB model, reviewed)
  • Device Type - PC gaming handheld
Lenovo Legion Go Review 7

The Lenovo Legion Go is an innovative handheld that packs a serious hardware punch. On the surface, the Legion Go is like a supercharged Nintendo Switch. It has two controller halves split by a screen for flexible on-the-go play, offering things like tabletop gaming.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 11

The Legion Go's secret sauce is a combination of performance, functionality, and customization. It's a very balanced machine that puts a PC in your backpack. Lenovo's handheld is a convergence of innovations in hardware, software, and user experience, offering decent PC gaming in a high-quality package that's fun to use.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 27Lenovo Legion Go Review 26
Buy at Amazon

Lenovo Legion Go 8.8' 144Hz WQXGA Handheld Touchscreen Gaming PC

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$649.99$649.99$649.99
Buy at Newegg
$649.99$649.99-
* Prices last scanned on 2/27/2024 at 9:45 pm CST - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Specifications

Lenovo Legion Go Specifications

  • Processor: AMD Ryzen™ Z1 Extreme Processor (3.30 GHz up to 5.10 GHz)
  • Operating System: Windows 11 Home 64
  • Graphics: Integrated AMD Radeon™ Graphics
  • Memory: 16 GB LPDDR5X-7500MHz (Soldered)
  • Storage: 512 GB /1TB SSD M.2 2242 PCIe Gen4 TLC
  • Display: 8.8" QHD (2560 x 1600), IPS, Touchscreen, 97%DCI-P3, 500 nits, 144Hz
  • Screen Resolution: 2560 x 1600
  • Touch Screen: Touch
  • Weight: Starting at .65kg / 1.41lbs
Lenovo Legion Go Review 205
Lenovo Legion Go Review 206
Lenovo Legion Go Review 207
Lenovo Legion Go Review 208

Performance Tests - Resolution & FPS

While this is indeed a device aimed at enthusiasts, you shouldn't expect enthusiast-level performance from the Legion Go's onboard AMD Z1 Extreme SoC. Game performance is variable, but on average, the handheld delivered its best results in the Performance mode presets.

Combining the Quiet x Efficiency TDP and OS Modes should be avoided at all costs if you care about frame rate--otherwise, you want to go all-in on Performance mode. Sure, you'll sacrifice battery, but it's ultimately worth it.

We tested 5 games in total on the Legion Go, including:

  • Far Cry 6 (Benchmark tool)
  • Metro Last Light (Benchmark tool)
  • Plague Tale Requiem (Cap Frame X)
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider (Benchmark tool)
  • Starfield (Cap Frame X)

Each game is run through six separate passes with different combinations of TDP Mode and OS Mode configs, as well as varying resolutions. The games captured using CapFrameX were done in 15-minute increments.

Far Cry 6

Lenovo Legion Go Review 214

Far Cry 6 is one of the more demanding games that we tested, and the performance wasn't so great on the Legion Go. At 1280x800 resolution at low graphics preset settings, I would get around 30 FPS in Far Cry 6 with the performance modes active. That being said, the gameplay still looked decent at 1280 res, and I actually enjoyed the experience quite a bit despite the lower-end visuals.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Frame rates capped out at 30FPS, but the minimum FPS was around 29FPS. The game didn't look fantastic, but the visuals were still playable. Just don't expect to get good res/perf from this game.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 62Lenovo Legion Go Review 63
Lenovo Legion Go Review 64Lenovo Legion Go Review 65
Lenovo Legion Go Review 66

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

A trend that we'll see throughout testing is that the Quiet x Efficiency mode combinations are not ideal for gaming. That was the case here, where the game delivered a huge FPS range between 12-21 frames per second mark at low settings.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 67Lenovo Legion Go Review 68
Lenovo Legion Go Review 69Lenovo Legion Go Review 70
Lenovo Legion Go Review 71

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

FPS was around 23 frames per second at 1920 x 1200 in the Balanced preset. These modes are more designed to sit in the middle of perf vs battery life.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 72Lenovo Legion Go Review 73
Lenovo Legion Go Review 74Lenovo Legion Go Review 75
Lenovo Legion Go Review 76

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

FPS got a slight bump to 24 average FPS and 26 max FPS, and the graphics weren't so bad either.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 77Lenovo Legion Go Review 78
Lenovo Legion Go Review 79Lenovo Legion Go Review 80
Lenovo Legion Go Review 81

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

The benchmark tool warned me that 2560x1600 resolution would exceed the Legion Go's available 2.9GB of VRAM memory, and performance suffered quite a bit as a result. FPS dropped as low as 14 and bumped as high as 24.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 82

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Predictably, Far Cry 6 ground to a FPS-crunching halt during this test. The benchmark tool exceeded VRAM thresholds by 360MB, and the game ranged from 3-7 FPS in the efficiency modes.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 83Lenovo Legion Go Review 84
Lenovo Legion Go Review 85Lenovo Legion Go Review 86
Lenovo Legion Go Review 87

Metro: Last Light

Lenovo Legion Go Review 215

Metro Last Light plays very well on the Legion Go, provided you avoid the Quiet x Efficiency settings combination. I was actually impressed at the FPS I was getting. The results were conducted with the Medium graphics preset enabled.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

This is where Metro really shined on the Legion Go. Just low resolution, low settings, and high FPS. Frame rates ranged from 56-95 FPS here.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 88Lenovo Legion Go Review 89
Lenovo Legion Go Review 90Lenovo Legion Go Review 91
Lenovo Legion Go Review 92

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Frames dropped quite a bit here, but FPS was variable depending on the pass. FPS ranged from 15-38FS on one pass, and 16-23 on another.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 93Lenovo Legion Go Review 94
Lenovo Legion Go Review 95Lenovo Legion Go Review 96
Lenovo Legion Go Review 97

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

Metro played a lot better with this config, and FPS was around on average 37 FPS, with minimum FPS dropping to 18FPS and max hitting 67. Visuals also looked solid.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 98Lenovo Legion Go Review 99
Lenovo Legion Go Review 100Lenovo Legion Go Review 101
Lenovo Legion Go Review 102

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

More fantastic results thanks to the Performance preset; frames ranged from 18 minimum, 56 average, and 89 max FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 103Lenovo Legion Go Review 104
Lenovo Legion Go Review 105Lenovo Legion Go Review 106
Lenovo Legion Go Review 107

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Pass 5 delivered almost the exact same FPS performance as Pass 4, which is impressive considering the resolution jump.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 108Lenovo Legion Go Review 109
Lenovo Legion Go Review 110Lenovo Legion Go Review 111
Lenovo Legion Go Review 112

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Results were as expected--not great. Minimum FPS was at around 4-6 frames per second, the average was at 14FPS, and frames maxed out at around 30-36FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 113Lenovo Legion Go Review 114
Lenovo Legion Go Review 115Lenovo Legion Go Review 116
Lenovo Legion Go Review 117

Plague Tale: Requiem

Lenovo Legion Go Review 216

This is also a modern game, and it was chosen because it's pretty demanding. I was curious to see how well it would run on the Legion Go, and the results were surprising. Plague Tale delivered a steady 45-50FPS with Perf/Perf presets in varying resolutions.

That being said, the menus were some of the big reasons for the large FPS jumps in modes like the Quiet/Efficiency config. The FPS spikes do not necessarily reflect actual gameplay. This is also the case for the lowest of the low FPS drops--I didn't really experience the 1-5 low FPS ranges while playing the game.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Solid results with average FPS at a clean 47 frames per second. Graphics also looked pretty good for a handheld. No real noticeable FPS drops or stutters.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 118Lenovo Legion Go Review 119
Lenovo Legion Go Review 120

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

FPS was significantly hit, and there were multiple bad frame stutters throughout play, but the handheld stayed cool and quiet. The average FPS stood at around 12 frames per second.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 121Lenovo Legion Go Review 122
Lenovo Legion Go Review 123

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

Gameplay felt decent, no input issues or noticeable FPS drops. Average frames were around 27FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 124
Lenovo Legion Go Review 125

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Average FPS was around 40 frames per second, and graphics were pretty stellar for such a small screen.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 126
Lenovo Legion Go Review 127

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Being able to hit over 50FPS average at 2560 x 1600 is impressive to say the least. Everything looked great and felt smooth to play.

Fans kicked up quite a bit, which is to be expected playing on Performance mode at 2560x1200 resolution. I did see pop-in and NPCs started off in T-poses a few times before clicking into place and starting to move as they should. Graphis look great and didn't see any noticeable FPS drops.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 128Lenovo Legion Go Review 129
Lenovo Legion Go Review 130

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Plague Tale was one of the only games that played nicely with this config. Average FPS was at around 43 frames per second and the visuals kept their charming look.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 131Lenovo Legion Go Review 132
Lenovo Legion Go Review 133

Shadow of the Tomb Raider

Lenovo Legion Go Review 217

Shadow of the Tomb Raider is a decently demanding game with a built-in benchmark, so we used that tool out of convenience. All tests were conducted on native resolution, but we chose to vary between Medium and High graphics preset settings just out of curiosity.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

This was conducted in the High graphics preset, and the Legion Go did pretty well, hitting 23FPS minimum and 36FPS average at 1280x800.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 134Lenovo Legion Go Review 135
Lenovo Legion Go Review 136Lenovo Legion Go Review 137
Lenovo Legion Go Review 138

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Once again, FPS took a major dive with this config. At Medium graphics preset, Shadow of the Tomb Raider ran at an average FPS of just 15 frames per second.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 139Lenovo Legion Go Review 140
Lenovo Legion Go Review 141Lenovo Legion Go Review 142
Lenovo Legion Go Review 143

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

At Medium preset, this config was able to achieve an average 39FPS in the bench tool. That's pretty decent for gameplay on a handheld like this.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 144Lenovo Legion Go Review 145
Lenovo Legion Go Review 146Lenovo Legion Go Review 147
Lenovo Legion Go Review 148

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Good FPS here as well, with an average frame rate of 35 with Medium preset. Definitely playable with good results.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 149Lenovo Legion Go Review 150
Lenovo Legion Go Review 151Lenovo Legion Go Review 152
Lenovo Legion Go Review 153

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

The resolution bump took its toll, so it's not advised that you play Shadow of the Tomb Raider at 2560p on the Legion Go. Average FPS dropped to just 23 FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 154Lenovo Legion Go Review 155
Lenovo Legion Go Review 156Lenovo Legion Go Review 157
Lenovo Legion Go Review 158

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

The game was virtually unplayable in this config, with FPS dropping to an average of just 7 frames per second.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 159Lenovo Legion Go Review 160
Lenovo Legion Go Review 161Lenovo Legion Go Review 162
Lenovo Legion Go Review 163

Shadow of War

Lenovo Legion Go Review 218

This is an older game and not so demanding by today's standards, but it also featured a built-in benching tool.

All passes were run at native resolution at Medium graphics preset.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

So-so results here at 31FPS average. Dropping settings down to Low is mostly advised for this game.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 164Lenovo Legion Go Review 165
Lenovo Legion Go Review 166Lenovo Legion Go Review 167
Lenovo Legion Go Review 168

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

These were surprising results. Somehow, Shadow of War maintained its 31FPS even with the dreaded Quiet x Efficiency config.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 169Lenovo Legion Go Review 170
Lenovo Legion Go Review 171Lenovo Legion Go Review 172
Lenovo Legion Go Review 173

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

FPS dropped a bit in balanced mode and the upped resolution, with average 20FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 174Lenovo Legion Go Review 175
Lenovo Legion Go Review 176

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Solid results as to be expected with 30FPS average at Medium preset.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 177Lenovo Legion Go Review 178
Lenovo Legion Go Review 179
Lenovo Legion Go Review 180

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

A small hit to FPS here with 28 frames per second average, so adjusting the resolution and/or settings is required to go beyond 30FPS.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 181Lenovo Legion Go Review 182
Lenovo Legion Go Review 183Lenovo Legion Go Review 184
Lenovo Legion Go Review 185

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Once again, an unplayable FPS result for this config.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 186Lenovo Legion Go Review 187
Lenovo Legion Go Review 188Lenovo Legion Go Review 189
Lenovo Legion Go Review 190

Starfield

Lenovo Legion Go Review 219

Bethesda's latest RPG makes use of new optimizations in an upgraded engine, and has had to be scaled to 30FPS on Xbox Series X/S consoles.

This test was conducted with the Low graphics preset using CapFrameX.

Pass 1 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Graphics are not great, obvious pixellations and low-end visuals (which is to be expected at this resolution and preset). The trade off is that FPS was really high, hitting around 54 frames per second on average.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 191
Lenovo Legion Go Review 192

Pass 2 - 1280 x 800

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

FPS dropped heavily and low FPS accounted for nearly 77% of frames. Average FPS was at 18.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 193
Lenovo Legion Go Review 194

Pass 3 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Balanced
  • OS Mode - Balanced

Average FPS was in line with consoles, hitting 30 frames per second. Graphics and visuals were decent, but we're being bogged down by frequent FPS drops.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 195
Lenovo Legion Go Review 196

Pass 4 - 1920 x 1200

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

Average FPS is a solid 37 and smooth frame rates overshadow the lower FPS occurrences, and graphics weren't impacted too much. Overall, this is a bit better than the kind of frame performance you'd find on consoles.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 197
Lenovo Legion Go Review 198

Pass 5 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Performance
  • OS Mode - Performance

The extra weight from the resolution boost pulls down FPS, but not by a whole lot. Starfield is still decently playable at a 27FPS-ish range, but there are more ideal performance vs resolution trade-offs to be made here.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 199Lenovo Legion Go Review 200
Lenovo Legion Go Review 201

Pass 6 - 2560 x 1600

  • TDP Mode - Quiet
  • OS Mode - Efficiency

Not great performance here and this mode should be avoided, but it's still interesting to see the variances between games.

Starfield ran at 16FPS average in this config.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 202
Lenovo Legion Go Review 203

Performance Tests - 3D Mark

Fire Strike

Lenovo Legion Go Review 220
Lenovo Legion Go Review 221

Fire Strike Extreme

Lenovo Legion Go Review 222
Lenovo Legion Go Review 223

Night Raid

Lenovo Legion Go Review 224
Lenovo Legion Go Review 225

Port Royal

Lenovo Legion Go Review 226
Lenovo Legion Go Review 227

Speed Way

Lenovo Legion Go Review 228
Lenovo Legion Go Review 229

Time Spy

Lenovo Legion Go Review 232
Lenovo Legion Go Review 233

Time Spy Stress Test

Lenovo Legion Go Review 230
Lenovo Legion Go Review 231

Battery & Temps

Lenovo Legion Go Review 204

The Legion Go's battery life is pretty decent, delivering around 2 hours of solid playtime. How much battery life you get depends on screen brightness, the demands of the game, and overall graphics and performance settings.

The handheld actually delivered little over 90 minutes of constant play at max brightness, 2560x1600 resolution, and High settings in Starfield.

1280x800

  • Mix of games at Low preset
  • 25-30% brightness
  • 2 hours, 19 minutes

1920x1200

  • Mix of games at Low preset
  • 25-30% brightness
  • Performance - Efficiency configuration
  • 1 hour, 57 minutes

2560x1600

  • Starfield at High preset
  • 100% brightness
  • Performance - Performance configuration
  • 1 hour, 35 minutes

Temps were likewise solid. The Legion Go expels heat in all the right places, and the thermal system is pretty good at keeping things cool.

Below, we have a few FLIR pictures of the Legion Go's outtake vents. Surface temperatures via thermal imaging were around 50-54C during load, even with the more demanding games like Far Cry 6.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 209Lenovo Legion Go Review 210
Lenovo Legion Go Review 213Lenovo Legion Go Review 212
Lenovo Legion Go Review 211

Controllers & Screen

Lenovo Legion Go Review 8

Apart from the processing power and the impressive screen, the controllers are a big selling point of the Lenovo Legion Go. In my experience, the controller's extra buttons are the system's most consistently enjoyable and useful feature.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 10Lenovo Legion Go Review 9

Unlike competing devices, the Legion Go takes a page from Nintendo's playbook with its detachable controllers. There are two controllers, one on either side of the tablet, that pop off for tabletop play.

The Switch has taught us that tabletop play is a must-have for any handheld. Lenovo took this lesson to heart by significantly upgrading the controllers and drastically increasing dual-hand play (one controller in either hand) in the process.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 16

This really comes down to two things: the feeling and functionality of each controller.

The controllers are hefty, they're much bigger than the Switch JoyCons, and they fit in your hands very well. The controller feels like it's designed for adults, more like a PS5 or Xbox controller. It has a certain level of weight to it that's satisfying, and it's not overbearing. A lot of the satisfying feeling comes from how the buttons and triggers are placed on each of the split handhelds.

Now, let's talk about the buttons. This is where things start to get really interesting.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 58

I'm an average gamer who typically uses the default controller when I play games. Just hand me a DualSense or even a more basic PowerA controller, and I'm fine. I haven't owned the higher-end DualSense Edge or Xbox Elite controllers. Using the Lenovo Legion Go changed all of that. I'm now a believer in having as many extra buttons on a well-designed controller as possible. It's a literal game-changer.

It's not enough to have extra buttons. Where they're placed, and how they're shaped, matters the most.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 13Lenovo Legion Go Review 15

Each of the Legion Go's controllers has different button placements.

The left controller is your standard D-Pad/movement scheme layout, with RT and R1 buttons. It also has a dedicated button for the Legion Go's built-in software suite, which is incredibly convenient if you ever need to adjust more specific parameters and settings (like, for instance, running controller diagnostics tests).

On the underside of the controller there are two extra buttons. These are specifically designed to serve as functional touchpoints for your fingerpads when holding the controller. The buttons are placed vertically, aligning perfectly with your fingers while holding the device.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 17Lenovo Legion Go Review 18
Lenovo Legion Go Review 19Lenovo Legion Go Review 20

The right controller is my personal favorite. It has a built-in trackpad, which is absolutely required to navigate the tiny Windows menus. It also has a dedicated settings quick launch button that allows you to easily change performance settings and resolution on the fly.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 52Lenovo Legion Go Review 53

The buttons are the best part, though. The right side has four extra buttons on it (well, five if you include the scroll wheel): There are the M1 and M2 buttons on the side of the controller and the M3 and Y3 buttons on the underside.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 36Lenovo Legion Go Review 40

Placement is only as important as functionality. Luckily, gamers can fully re-program and custom map these buttons. For instance, I custom map Y3 to reload when playing shooters, making it so that I don't have to take my thumb off the right analog stick to press X.

This makes the Legion Go an incredibly customizable device that can add a new dimensionality to gameplay experiences. Being able to map simple commands like "jump" or "use" to the Y1 and Y2 buttons has drastically improved my experiences. It's not the button mapping that's new-it's the buttons themselves, and the way they're used.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 12Lenovo Legion Go Review 23
Lenovo Legion Go Review 12Lenovo Legion Go Review 11

The Legion Go's screen is an impressive 8.8-inch QHD+ IPS display that's big, bold, and beautiful. Gameplay visuals are crisp and clear, colors are vivid, and the screen is enjoyable to look at and interact with.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 2

It has a touchscreen that's sensitive enough to pick up light touches, which is great if you want to use a stylus to interact (Windows 11 can be finicky to use on a small screen). The panel supports both 60Hz and 144Hz, although the latter really isn't needed, especially with the Go only pushing 30-50FPS in most games.

Overall, the screen is a consistent reminder of the Go's premium quality.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 24

Final Thoughts

The Legion Go is on the higher end of portable gaming, handily beating the Nintendo Switch and matching the ROG Ally. It's a handy, capable, and surprisingly customizable device that also has the benefit of being a fully-fledged Windows 11 PC--that means a full suite of apps and programs that you'd find on a desktop.

The Go is a hefty beast of a handheld that combines versatility, power, and a thoughtful design in one. This is the forefront of a new era in PC-handheld hybrids and the Legion Go leads the charge.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 5

Things I loved about the Legion Go

The kickstand - The Legion Go's kickstand is fantastic. It's less of a stand and more of an extension of the handheld's back panel. The stand spans the entirety of the device's width so it's pretty well reinforced. It's a stark contrast to the wobbly and rickety shakiness of the kickstand in the OG 2017 Nintendo Switch launch model. Lenovo designed the stand to be tough and durable, and it won't buckle or flimsily yield under pressure. This is incredibly an incredibly important addition that protects the Legion Go with a stable base when you're playing in tabletop mode.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 29Lenovo Legion Go Review 30
Lenovo Legion Go Review 31Lenovo Legion Go Review 22

The controllers - The unique button layout coupled with the flexible, split design makes the controllers interesting and fun to use.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 6

The screen - You'll be staring at this the entire time, so a high-quality screen is important for any handheld. Lenovo delivers beyond the mark here, and the 8.8-inch panel looks fantastic at any brightness.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 235

USB Ports & Case - I love the top and bottom USB-C ports, allowing you to use a dongle or other series of peripherals while the system is charging. The case is super reinforced and even has a neat little hole with a flap that lets you charge the Legion Go while safely ensconced in its shell casing.

Lenovo Legion Go Review 23

Complaints

At no point did I face anything that was truly deal-breaking with the Legion Go, but given it's a PC, the handheld is prey to all of the major frustrations of PC gaming. Expect to spend a lot of time tweaking software, setting things up, experimenting, and overall being ready to troubleshoot at a moment's notice.

The Legion Go is a great device, but it's not immune to the annoyances and meticulous, finicky nature of enthusiast PC building/operating/maintenance.

The screen would often refuse to turn back on after the device went to sleep. Analog sticks would light up, but the screen wouldn't turn on.

On-screen keyboard pops up when playing games

Pressing the left analog stick button would cause a virtual keyboard to pop up while gaming. It's a nice feature to have when not gaming, but absolutely interrupts gameplay because that's the stick needed for sprinting in tons of video games.

This problem had nothing to do with the hardware. The problem was tied to Steam's controller settings and required adjustment of the joystick settings.

Had a difficult time capturing screenshots/footage while docked

The Lenovo Legion Go didn't play all that nicely with my Elgato capture card. I hooked up the Legion Go to the capture card via a third-party USB-C to HDMI dongle, and the image was frequently warped. For some reason, the Legion Go output a sideways screen when transmitting video to my Elgato capture card. I managed to fix this by turning the rotation lock on and off in Windows display settings.

Size Comparisons

Lenovo Legion Go Review 234
Lenovo Legion Go Review 4
Lenovo Legion Go Review 25
Lenovo Legion Go Review 32
Lenovo Legion Go Review 33
Lenovo Legion Go Review 34
Lenovo Legion Go Review 48
Lenovo Legion Go Review 49
Lenovo Legion Go Review 50
Lenovo Legion Go Review 51
Photo of product for sale

Performance

80%

Quality

95%

Features

95%

Value

90%

Overall

90%

The Bottom Line

The Legion Go's brilliant screen, unique controllers, and decent performance makes it a must-have for portable enthusiasts.

TweakTown award
90%

Lenovo Legion Go 8.8' 144Hz WQXGA Handheld Touchscreen Gaming PC

TodayYesterday7 days ago30 days ago
$649.99$649.99$649.99
Buy at Newegg
$649.99$649.99-
* Prices last scanned on 2/27/2024 at 9:45 pm CST - prices may not be accurate, click links above for the latest price. We may earn an affiliate commission.

Derek joined the TweakTown team in 2015 and has since reviewed and played 1000s of hours of new games. Derek is absorbed with the intersection of technology and gaming, and is always looking forward to new advancements. With over six years in games journalism under his belt, Derek aims to further engage the gaming sector while taking a peek under the tech that powers it. He hopes to one day explore the stars in No Man's Sky with the magic of VR.

Newsletter Subscription
We openly invite the companies who provide us with review samples / who are mentioned or discussed to express their opinion. If any company representative wishes to respond, we will publish the response here. Please contact us if you wish to respond.