Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 388

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 388.

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Asteroid mining to make Earth rich, 800 billion liters of space water

Jak Connor | Sep 30, 2019 2:03 AM CDT

A new study has claimed that there is about 1,000 water-rich or "hydrated" asteroids that are prime for harvesting, and mining them would be easier than landing back on the moons surface and harvesting the lunar poles.

Asteroid mining to make Earth rich, 800 billion liters of space water

Andrew Rivkin, an asteroid researcher at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Research Laboratory in Maryland and lead author on the paper said that "Most of the hydrated material in the near-Earth population is contained in the largest few hydrated objects". Rivkin also suggested that if we were to land on these asteroids, and somehow established a connection line back to Earth massive profits could be made.

It is estimated that out of the 1,000 water-rich asteroids that more than 25 of them are large enough to provide more than a significant amount of water. Space.com says that the indicated asteroids contain enough water to fill 320,000 Olympic-size swimming pools and is much more water than both the Lunar poles. If there was a way to successfully establish refueling stations on these orbiting asteroids, human space exploration could unlock a 'level-up' moment as there would be no need to send fuel from Earth anymore.

Continue reading: Asteroid mining to make Earth rich, 800 billion liters of space water (full post)

SpaceX compares its Starship MK1 to the Millennium Falcon

Anthony Garreffa | Sep 29, 2019 4:36 AM CDT

Elon Musk must be sipping champagne by now, with SpaceX hitting a new milestone in its Starship and Super Heavy rockets with the first fully-assembled Starship MK1 shown off.

SpaceX compares its Starship MK1 to the Millennium Falcon

This is the Starship MK1 in all of its engineering glory, the first prototype that has been shown off by SpaceX as part of its continued foray into interplanetary transportation systems. Starship MK1 uses SpaceX's own Super Heavy rocket system that will see payloads delivered to both the Moon, and in future missions, to Mars.

Where the new Starship takes things to the next level is that it uses an in-space re-filling by propellant -- with the Starship docking with tanker Starship vessels to re-fuel before taking off for their larger destination -- Mars, and other planets in and around our solar system. The additional fuel is required for the large amount of supplies and passengers, of which we're talking supplies to build bases on other planets (like Mars) and up to 100 passengers.

Continue reading: SpaceX compares its Starship MK1 to the Millennium Falcon (full post)

Astrophysicists say gamma-ray jets can move faster than speed of light

Jak Connor | Sep 27, 2019 1:03 AM CDT

Astrophysicists out of the College of Charleston have issued a new paper that has been published in The Astrophysical Journal suggesting something can move faster than the speed of light.

Astrophysicists say gamma-ray jets can move faster than speed of light

One of the core principles of physics is Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, which states that no object can move faster than the speed of light. This is because when an object is moved it requires energy, and as an object is moved faster and faster its mass grows becoming 'heavier' requiring more energy. So when an object reaches close to the speed of light (299792458 meters per second) its mass is almost infinite making it impossible to surpass this speed.

Jon Hakkila and Robert Nemiroff aren't going against Einstein's established ruling, but what they have found is that gamma rays that are blasting out of a blazar (an active galactic nucleus with a relativistic jet. Above image) surpass the speed of light in surrounding gas clouds. This would make these gamma-ray jets superluminal. It was found that this isn't the case in a vacuum, meaning that Einstein's theory still holds solid cosmological ground. Here is what Hakkila said "Standard gamma-ray burst models have neglected time-reversible light curve properties. Superluminal jet motion accounts for these properties while retaining a great many standard model features."

Continue reading: Astrophysicists say gamma-ray jets can move faster than speed of light (full post)

NASA's new Black Hole visualization explains how & why we observe it

Jak Connor | Sep 26, 2019 4:06 AM CDT

NASA has issued out a new visualization that illustrates to viewers how a black hole warps its surroundings. The image is located below.

NASA's new Black Hole visualization explains how & why we observe it

Above we have the image released by NASA, and they explain that we can see where the black holes extreme gravitational pull has managed to pull in large amounts of matter that form into a thin structure called an accretion disk. It is also detailed that due to the black holes gravitational pull that light cannot even escape its draw, skewing the rays from all different directions and resulting in the strange shape we observe.

Closest to the center of the black hole is gas which form knots that and dissipate and re-form as the accretion disks magnetic fields change. At the bottom center of the black hole we can see what is called a "photon-ring" which is composed of multiple rings of light that have been bent. These rings will grow progressively fainter as time goes on due to the light circling the black hole many times and eventually not being able to reach our eyes. Here is the first-ever image of real-life black hole.

Continue reading: NASA's new Black Hole visualization explains how & why we observe it (full post)

Astronaut Tweets out incredible image from International Space Station

Jak Connor | Sep 26, 2019 2:05 AM CDT

The Soyuz 61 crew recently took off from Earths surface yesterday, and upon arrival at the International Space Station (ISS) a crew member of the ISS snapped this awesome picture.

Astronaut Tweets out incredible image from International Space Station

NASA astronaut Jessica Meir, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka and United Arab Emirates spaceflight participant Hazza AlMansoori launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on September 25th. It wasn't long before they were to join the ISS crew of six that has been living and conducting experiments aboard the flying lab/observatory. Jessica Meir was on route to join her best-friend and classmate Christina Koch and upon Meirs arrival Koch snapped this incredible picture.

"What it looks like from @Space_Station when your best friend achieves her lifelong dream to go to space". She continued and explained what the image is of "Caught the second stage in progress! We can't wait to welcome you onboard, crew of Soyuz 61!" Meir and Skripochka will stay on board the ISS until February next year, while AlMansoori will return back to Earth in just week since he is just a spaceflight participant.

Continue reading: Astronaut Tweets out incredible image from International Space Station (full post)

Boston Dynamics' robot dog 'Spot' is ready to take your mundane job

Jak Connor | Sep 25, 2019 7:04 AM CDT

Boston Dynamics have finished up some designs of their robot dog 'Spot' and have decided to put him to work. Companies can now join their leasing program to acquire their very own Spot robot.

Boston Dynamics' robot dog 'Spot' is ready to take your mundane job

You have perhaps seen Boston Dynamics' robot dog before, and since its original reveal calibrations have been made that allow for Spot to avoid obstacles much better and keep balance under not-so-good circumstances. Why would companies want their very own Spot? Spot can carry up to four hardware modules on his back, which gives companies room to equip Spot with whatever it needs to complete its task. An example of a task is Spot being trained to check gas leaks with a methane detector.

Other use cases could be a company wanting to track connectivity over a long distance, Spot can be equipped with a radio transmitter and set on a specific course. Spot is also capable of also working in the rain. There are many different use cases for Spot, but one of them is something that Michael Perry, VP of business development at Boston Dynamics doesn't want to see, and thats Spot being converted into some sort of weapon. Here is what he had say, "Fundamentally, we don't want to see Spot doing anything that harms people, even in a simulated way".

Continue reading: Boston Dynamics' robot dog 'Spot' is ready to take your mundane job (full post)

Russia won't tell NASA what caused LEAK on International Space Station

Anthony Garreffa | Sep 24, 2019 10:36 PM CDT

A super-small and easily-fixed hole was discovered on the International Space Station in August 2018 by flight controllers, and now someone finally knows why.

Russia won't tell NASA what caused LEAK on International Space Station

Russia knows and it won't say what it was, with Russian space agency boss Dmitry Rogozin saying they know what it was but will not share the information with the US or NASA. Rogozin told attendees at a youth science conference: "We know exactly what happened, but we won't tell you anything".

It wasn't just the youth at the science fair that the Russian space agency boss was cold to, but also NASA -- in whom it is in direct partnership with along with the United States when it comes to the International Space Station. NASA boss Jim Bridenstine told the Houston Chronicle: "They have not told me anything. I don't want to let one item set (the relationship) back, but it is clearly not acceptable that there are holes in the International Space Station".

Continue reading: Russia won't tell NASA what caused LEAK on International Space Station (full post)

Scientists find ENTIRELY NEW MINERAL inside a diamond in South Africa

Anthony Garreffa | Sep 24, 2019 7:02 PM CDT

A new mineral has been found inside of a diamond at a volcanic site in South Africa, with Ph.D. student Nicole Meyer and a team of researchers from the University of Alberta making the discovery.

Scientists find ENTIRELY NEW MINERAL inside a diamond in South Africa

The new material is known as Goldschmidtite after the legendary geochemist Victor Moritz Goldschmidt, and was found atop the Koffiefontein mine in a volcanic dig site, inside of a diamond. Goldschmidtite is an interesting new mineral, and finding it must've felt like ten Christmas mornings at once for the team.

Meyer explained: "Goldschmidtite has high concentrations of niobium, potassium, and the rare earth elements lanthanum and cerium, whereas the rest of the mantle is dominated by other elements, such as magnesium and iron".

Continue reading: Scientists find ENTIRELY NEW MINERAL inside a diamond in South Africa (full post)

NASA budget in $150 million for new planetary defense instrument

Jak Connor | Sep 24, 2019 4:07 AM CDT

NASA has announced that they want to build a brand new space telescope to become the observer of the planet, this telescope would serve as a planetary defense instrument.

NASA budget in $150 million for new planetary defense instrument

NASA has said that they have put away $150 million dollars of their budget to build this new telescope, and that if they did proceed to develop it that it would be able to track asteroids in Earths immediate neighborhood. Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, Thomas Zurbuchen said during the Planetary Science Advisory Committee meeting today that "The goal is not to do everything for eternity. The goal is to do the right things as they pop up."

For the space telescope to be a ultility to the planet, it would need to be able to track the positioning of a multitude of different asteroids as well as take into account their size and projected routes. This new proposed NASA telescope would be able to do this and it could reach the skies as early as 2025. If the telescope does get approved and is launched, its believed that it would be able to find 65% of the undiscovered space objects currently floating around out in the ether.

Continue reading: NASA budget in $150 million for new planetary defense instrument (full post)

Russian Navy rescue boat sunk by WALRUS during Arctic mission

Anthony Garreffa | Sep 23, 2019 8:00 PM CDT

I didn't think I'd be typing this today but here it goes -- a female walrus has attacked, and successfully sunk a Russian Navy rescue boat by a female walrus. The walrus was most likely protecting its young, explains the RGO.

Russian Navy rescue boat sunk by WALRUS during Arctic mission

The Altai was sent out by the Russian navy's North Fleet, which was sailing away towards Franz Josef Land archipelago in the Arctic with researchers from the Russian Geographical Society on-board. In order to get to the Altai shore the crew had to get off the larger vessel and onto a smaller landing craft, which is when things got serious.

A female walrus appeared and attacked one of the expedition boats, sinking it. The research group explained: "Walruses attacked the participating boat. The boat sank, but the tragedy was avoided thanks to the clear actions of the squad leader. All the landing participants safely reached the shore".

Continue reading: Russian Navy rescue boat sunk by WALRUS during Arctic mission (full post)