Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 253

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 253.

First-ever photo of Quantum Entanglement in action captured

Jak Connor | Thu, Aug 1 2019 2:00 AM CDT

Scientists have just captured the first-ever image of the naturally occurring and extremely interesting phenomenon called 'Quantum Entanglement'.

First-ever photo of Quantum Entanglement in action captured | TweakTown.com

Quantum Entanglement has perplexed scientists for quite some time, even going back to the creator of the general theory of relativity, Albert Einstein. Einstein called Quantum Entanglement "spooky action at a distance" as particles can remain connected to each other such that their physical properties will influence one another no matter the distance between them.

Scientists at the University of Glasgow recently conducted an experiment with an array of lasers and crystals that allowed for them to entangle photons, or light particles. The scientists hit the crystals with the ultraviolet (UV) laser that caused some of the photons to break off, resulting in some of the photons entangling and giving the scientists an opportunity to capture the entanglement in action. Miles Padgett, the professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Glasgow commented on the experiment, saying this is "the pivotal test of quantum entanglement" and that "this is the first time anyone has used a camera to confirm [it]."

Continue reading: First-ever photo of Quantum Entanglement in action captured (full post)

Apollo 11's glass Moon prisms is science we still use today

Jak Connor | Wed, Jul 31 2019 5:00 AM CDT

NASA's Apollo 11 mission was not only a pivotal point in human history, but also a gift that keeps on giving as the work the astronauts did aboard the massive space rock still is helping us out today.

Apollo 11's glass Moon prisms is science we still use today | TweakTown.com

In 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin blasted off to the surface of the Moon, after a successful landing and an adventure out onto the wasteland-like surface, science needed to be conducted. One of the experiements the two astronauts did was the installation of glass prism arrays on the Moon's surface. These prisms were placed there so scientists back on Earth could fire lasers at them and measure the distance between Earth and the Moon.

While those prisms were placed there back in 1969, they are still being used today and have delivered an extraordinary amount of valuable information. Observatories on Earth have fired lasers at these prisms and waited for the light to return back to Earth to measure the distance between the two floating objects. It was discovered that the Moon is actually moving 1.5 inches away from Earth each year, and that at the moment the Moon is currently 384,400km away from Earth.

Continue reading: Apollo 11's glass Moon prisms is science we still use today (full post)

Tesla Megapack battery could power San Francisco for 6 hours

Anthony Garreffa | Tue, Jul 30 2019 7:30 PM CDT

Tesla has just announced its new Megapack, a new gigantic battery system that will replace "peaker" power plants that will see energy being generated when the local electricity grid gets overloaded.

Tesla Megapack battery could power San Francisco for 6 hours | TweakTown.com

The new Tesla Megapack is already being deployed, with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) using multiple Megapacks at Moss Landing on Monterey Bay, California. This is just 1 of 4 locations that will see Tesla's new Megapack batteries installed, with each of them storing up to 3 megawatt hours (MWh) of energy at a time.

They can be daisy-chained to store over 1GWh of energy storage, something that Tesla claims is enough energy to power every home in San Francisco for six hours. In typical Tesla engineering fashion, the new Megapacks will include "battery modules, bi-directional inverters, a thermal management system, an AC main breaker and controls".

Continue reading: Tesla Megapack battery could power San Francisco for 6 hours (full post)

ISS uses Earth's atmosphere as a fiery garbage disposal

Jak Connor | Tue, Jul 30 2019 3:00 AM CDT

The International Space Station (ISS), just like anyone's room or house, accumulates garbage or rubbish over time. ISS astronauts have now disposed some of their built up garbage by using Earth's atmosphere.

ISS uses Earth's atmosphere as a fiery garbage disposal | TweakTown.com

Just recently, Elon Musk's space exploration company, SpaceX launched a cargo ship to the ISS via their Falcon 9 rocket. The Falcon 9 was carrying their Dragon Capsule that contained supplies for numerous scientific experiments, and other necessities for the astronauts aboard. This morning, the docking compartment on the Russian section of the ISS released the Progress 72 cargo spacecraft. This craft was at the ISS for 4 months and once its supplies were extracted after its arrival it was literally used as one big bin.

When re-entering the Earth's atmosphere, the object is introduced to extreme friction which causes sparks and intense flames to be produced. This is the disposal method for the rubbish on the ISS as Progress 72 is now currently making its way down to Earth's atmosphere loaded with "trash and discarded gear for a fiery, but safe disposal over the Pacific Ocean." In other news about the ISS, the supplies that SpaceX's Dragon Capsule were carrying will allow for scientists to test 3D human tissue printing in low gravity, more on that here.

Continue reading: ISS uses Earth's atmosphere as a fiery garbage disposal (full post)

Blink twice and zoom in +32% with these contact lenses

Jak Connor | Tue, Jul 30 2019 2:00 AM CDT

Considering the thought that glasses technology will soon be adopted by the mainstream, what would be the extent of that technology? Perhaps some sci-fi level contact lenses that allow the user to have mini-binoculars in their eyes.

Blink twice and zoom in +32% with these contact lenses | TweakTown.com

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have designed and created some brand new contact lenses that can do just that. The lenses are capable of measuring the electrooculographic signals the eye creates when it is moved up and down. Since these signals are tracked, the lenses measure the impulses that are generated by the eye and when users blink twice the focal length on the lenses is adjusted.

The focal length on these contact lenses can be changed by as much as 32%, simply by the user of the contacts moving their eyes and blinking twice. Shengqiang Cai, a lead researcher for the new contacts told New Scientist, "Even if your eye cannot see anything, many people can still move their eyeball and generate this electro-oculographic signal." Since these signals are always being sent from the eye, researchers say that these contacts could have applications in "visual prostheses, adjustable glasses, and remotely operated robotics in the future."

Continue reading: Blink twice and zoom in +32% with these contact lenses (full post)

France wants GUNS and LASERS on its satellites by 2030

Anthony Garreffa | Mon, Jul 29 2019 7:34 PM CDT

In something out of an evil villain from a superhero movie, the French government is pushing to have lasers and guns on its satellites by as early as 2030.

French President Emmanuel Macron announced news of a French space force defending its satellites recently, which has quickly morphed into seeing France's Ministry of Defense announcing a new project that would see guns and lasers attached to satellites. The country is spending $780 million of its military budget in space defense, adding to the existing $4 billion military program for 2019-2025.

The country has planned for its military to build next-gen satellites that are capable of detecting enemies and other objects with cameras, and then the successor to that gets huge upgrades with on-board submachine guns, and even lasers that will be used in a destructive force to "disable other satellites" by shooting their solar panels.

France's minister of defense, Florence Parly, announced the new weapon-equipped satellite program that will move into patrol nano-satellites with power lasers with Le Point. Parly said: "If our satellites are threatened, we will consider blinding those of our opponents. This may involve the use of power lasers deployed from our satellites or from our patrol nano-satellites".

Continue reading: France wants GUNS and LASERS on its satellites by 2030 (full post)

Nuclear explosion level asteroid had close-shave with Earth

Jak Connor | Mon, Jul 29 2019 4:00 AM CDT

Before you freak out, asteroids whizz past Earth all the time and NASA is currently tracking 90 percent of the most dangerous asteroids in space. There is no immediate global level threat at the moment, but astronomers did just miss an asteroid that could of caused a nuclear-level destruction.

Nuclear explosion level asteroid had close-shave with Earth | TweakTown.com

The asteroid was called 2019 OK and on July 25th, it flew passed Earth at a range of 45,000 miles. The asteroid ranged in size from 187-427 feet and according to Michael Brown, an associate professor in astronomy at Monash University in Australia, if the asteroid collided with Earth the destruction would devastating. "The lack of warning shows how quickly potentially dangerous asteroids can sneak up on us" said Brown.

This also isn't the first time an asteroid has appeared out of nowhere to us, back in 2013 a meteor exploded over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk and the blast was stronger than a nuclear explosion. This meteor injured over 1,000 people and was only 66 feet in diameter which is much smaller than 2019 OK which just flew past Earth. Astronomers will still continue to monitor asteroids and better yet NASA are currently working on ways to deflect asteroids that are in route to collide with Earth.

Continue reading: Nuclear explosion level asteroid had close-shave with Earth (full post)

International Space Station begins 3D human tissue printing

Jak Connor | Mon, Jul 29 2019 3:00 AM CDT

A couple of days ago, SpaceX launched their Dragon Capsule spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS) on a cargo delivery mission. That craft has now be successfully grabbed by the ISS's robotic arm.

International Space Station begins 3D human tissue printing | TweakTown.com

On July 25th, SpaceX launched the Dragon Capsule on their Falcon 9 rocket containing more than 5,000 lbs of supplies and equipment. The craft also contains 2,500 lbs of science gear that will enable and fuel many experiments that will be conducted on the ISS by astronauts.

Flight controllers on Earth will operate the ISS's robotic space arm to port the craft on the ISS which will then enable the on-board astronauts to venture into the capsule to acquire the supplies. The supplies that will be on-board of the Dragon Capsule will enable the astronauts to conduct experiments in low-gravitational environments. Some of these experiments include the fabrication of human tissue using a 3D printer and how microgravity affects the process of human tissue healing and regeneration.

Continue reading: International Space Station begins 3D human tissue printing (full post)

Space X-ray observatory snaps gorgeous galaxy cluster images

Jak Connor | Mon, Jul 29 2019 2:00 AM CDT

NASA's 20 year old Chandra X-Ray Observatory launched from the surface of Earth to give NASA, and their researchers a better understanding of how radiation is produced and observed in the universe.

Space X-ray observatory snaps gorgeous galaxy cluster images | TweakTown.com

The observatory launched 20 years ago and was named after the Nobel Prize winner Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, who was an indian American astrophysicist and was honored for his contribution towards the now current understanding of astronomy. Chandra X-Ray Observatory launched back on July 23, 1999 and has been orbiting earth and observing the structure of huge galaxy clusters ever since.

Belinda Wilkes, Chandra X-ray Center director gave a statement on some newly released images out of Chandra, saying "Chandra remains peerless in its ability to find and study X-ray sources. Since virtually every astronomical source emits X-rays, we need a telescope like Chandra to fully view and understand our universe." Not only is Chandra observing galaxies and star clusters, the observatory is also monitoring gravitational waves (massive ripples in space-time) and black hole mergers.

Continue reading: Space X-ray observatory snaps gorgeous galaxy cluster images (full post)

The Sun will eventually eat Earth, scientists give example

Jak Connor | Fri, Jul 26 2019 3:00 AM CDT

A recent study conducted by some international astronomers has shined a light on a dying star that is very similar to the one that is in our solar system and how it will eventually die.

The Sun will eventually eat Earth, scientists give example | TweakTown.com

It is a strange thought to consider the fact that our Sun, literally the source of life in our solar system will eventually die. Perhaps not in our life time (you reading this), but eventually it will. Dr Meridith Joyce, an astronomer at The Australian National University (ANU) in collaboration with Dr Laszlo Molnár and Dr Laszlo Kiss from the Konkoly Observatory of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences conducted the recent study on T Ursae Minoris (T UMi).

The astronomers observed T Ursae Minoris becoming unstable with internal energy flares from nuclear fusion that are deemed "hiccups" by the astronomers. These "hiccups" are scientifically called thermal pulses and according to Dr Joyce, "cause drastic, rapid changes in the size and brightness of the star, which are detectable over centuries. The pulses of old stars like T UMi also enrich the entire Universe with elements including carbon, nitrogen, tin and lead."

Continue reading: The Sun will eventually eat Earth, scientists give example (full post)

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