Renowned Harvard scientist claims real alien technology has been discovered

A famous Harvard scientist has reinforced his claims that alien technology was discovered in the ocean off the coast of Papa New Guinea.

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Harvard scientist Avi Loeb, known for claiming the interstellar object known as 'Oumuamua that passed through our solar system in 2017 was an alien probe, has backed up his claims from last year that pieces of alien technology were discovered in the ocean off the coast of Papa New Guinea.

It was back in July last year that Avi Loeb claimed his team discovered fragments of alien technology at the crash site of the meteor that entered Earth's atmosphere in January 2014. The team sifted through meteor data and discovered the meteorite known as IM1 was traveling "too fast" to have come from within our solar system, meaning it was an object that came from outside of our solar system.

The team ran a magnetic sheet over the seafloor, and what was recovered is claimed to be made from material that is stronger than "all space rocks cataloged by NASA over the past decade," per Loeb. Notably, the Harvard scientist went on the record saying the tiny spheres recovered from the crash site looked like miniature Earths as they contained distinct colors of blue, brown, and gold.

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In a recent interview, Loeb is standing by his previous claims, with the Harvard scientist telling Boston Public Radio that new evidence based on analysis of the spheres points to the object's chemical composition being "clearly very different" from coal ash, which is what other scientists rebutting Loeb's alien technology claims said the spheres were.

"What we did is compare 55 elements from the periodic table in coal ash to those special spherules that we found," Loeb told the radio station. "And it's clearly very different."

"It's not based on opinions. And, of course, if you're not part of this scientific process and you are jealous of the attention that it gets, then you can raise a lot of criticism," added Loeb

Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science, space, and artificial intelligence news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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