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The average Silicon Valley Tech salary has passed $100k

$100,000 is the average wage of Silicon Valley Tech workers

By Anthony Garreffa on Jan 24, 2012 01:26 am CST - 1 min, 7 secs reading time

The average annual salary of a Silicon Valley technology worker has surpassed the $100,000 mark this year. Tech-jobs website operator Dice Holdings Inc. has said that salaries for software and other engineering professionals in California's Silicon Valley rose 5.2-percent to an average of $104,195 last year.

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This beat the average 2-percent increase to $81,327 in tech-workers' salaries nationwide. It was also the first time since Dice began the salary survey in 2001 that the numbers broke the $100,000 mark, said Tom Silver, a Dice senior vice president. It comes at a time where companies such as Facebook Inc., Zynga Inc., and Twitter Inc., that have reignited the web boom.

Some companies have gone public, too, with LinkedIn Corp. and Zynga hitting IPOs and Facebook is eyeing an IPO soon, too. Their success has made a domino effect on new start-ups, which has then ignited a hiring war for software engineers and others.

To compare, job growth elsewhere in the U.S. has remained relatively slow. U.S. employers added 200,000 jobs in December, and the unemployment rate ticked down to 8.5-percent, its lowest level since early 2009. Silver said "there's a tussle for talent growing in Silicon Valley and employers have to pay up." Tech-job postings in Silicon Valley on Dice rose to 5,026 earlier this month, up 26-percent from 3,974 a year ago. Nationwide, tech-jobs only rose 11-percent in the same period.

Anthony Garreffa

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Anthony Garreffa

Anthony is a long time PC enthusiast with a passion of hate for games to be built around consoles. With FPS gaming since the pre-Quake days, where you were insulted if you used a mouse to aim, he has been addicted to gaming and hardware ever since. Working in IT retail for 10 years gave him great experience with high-end, custom-built PCs. His addiction to GPU technology is unwavering, and with next-gen NVIDIA GPUs about to launch alongside 4K 144Hz HDR G-Sync gaming monitors and BFGDs (65-inch 4K 120Hz HDR G-Sync TVs) there has never been a time to be more excited about technology.

NEWS SOURCE:online.wsj.com

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