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Intel Core i7-875K (Socket 1156) Unlocked CPU - Synthetic Tests - Part I

Intel has upped the overclocking ante on their CPU line-up with a new "K" series CPU. Will these unlocked parts really help with your OC addiction?

| Intel CPUs in CPUs, Chipsets & SoCs | Posted: May 28, 2010 4:03 am
TweakTown Rating: 90%      Manufacturer: Intel

With any system you will want to see a combination of synthetic testing and real-world. Synthetics give you a static, easily repeatable testing method that can be compared across multiple platforms. For our synthetic tests we use Everest Ultimate, Sisoft Sandra, FutureMark's 3DMark Vantage and PCMark Vantage, Cinebench as well as HyperPi. Each of these covers a different aspect of performance or a different angle of a certain type of performance.

 


Memory Bandwidth

 

Memory is a big part of current system performance. In most systems slow or flakey memory performance will impact almost every type of application you run. To test memory we use a combination of Sisoft Sandra and HyperPi 0.99.

 


Sisoft Sandra

 

Version and / or Patch Used: 2010c 1626
Developer Homepage: http://www.sisoftware.net
Product Homepage: http://www.sisoftware.net
Buy It Here

 

TweakTown image content/3/3/3310_30.png

 

The i7 875K's memory performance is what you would expect from an 1156 i7. We honestly did not expect to see much of a boost here at stock speeds, but did enjoy the increased memory performance we were able to get during our overclocked run, even though it was not the fastest.

 

We also threw in some numbers for other parts of the new i7 875K's performance. We will be including this in all CPU reviews moving forward. These represent some core performance area for CPU workload.

 

TweakTown image content/3/3/3310_31.png

 


HyperPi 0.99

 

Version and / or Patch Used: 0.99
Developer Homepage: http://www.virgilioborges.com.br
Product Homepage: http://www.virgilioborges.com.br
Download It Here

 

HyperPi is a front end for SuperPi that allows for multiple concurrent instances of SuperPi to be run on each core recognized by the system. It is very dependent on CPU to memory to HDD speed. The faster these components, the faster it is able to figure out the number Pi to the selected length.

 

For our testing we use the 32M run. This means that each of the four physical and four logical cores for the i7 and the four physical cores of the i5 is trying to calculate the number Pi out to 32 million decimal places. Each "run" is a comparative to ensure accuracy and any stability or performance issues in the loop mentioned above will cause errors in calculation.

 

TweakTown image content/3/3/3310_32.png

 

HyperPi is particularly hard on CPUs with HyperThreading. It is asking each core to try and handle two separate Pi calculations (out to 32 million places) at once. This is why the Core i5 750 still managed to trounce the rest of the CPUs in the list. Still, the Core i7-875K did a very impressive job, even beating the 980X once we pushed the CPU.

 

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