Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 263

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 263.

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NASA uses Cleveland to learn how to setup Wi-Fi on the Moon

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 6:32 AM CDT

NASA has explained via a press release that a new study is exploring how possible it is to build a Wi-Fi network on the lunar surface.

NASA uses Cleveland to learn how to setup Wi-Fi on the Moon

NASA's Compass Lab conducted the study, and researchers behind it compared the inadequate internet access in some areas in Cleveland to the lunar surface in an effort to solve two problems; giving those people in areas without a connection a sustained connection and the construction of a Wi-Fi network on the Moon. According to the National Digital Alliance, around 31% of Cleveland households aren't connected to the internet.

The researchers behind the study compared the lunar surface area with an area around Cleveland to discover technical challenges within the local area. The study found that if Wi-Fi routers were attached to around 20,000 lampposts or other poles around Cleveland, all residents in the local area would have an available connection at any given time. With routers placed no more than 100 yards apart, the researchers estimated that a family of four would be able to get a 7.5 megabits per second download speed.

Continue reading: NASA uses Cleveland to learn how to setup Wi-Fi on the Moon (full post)

First ever movie footage shot in space, film crew safely returns home

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 6:02 AM CDT

The first film crew to ever shoot footage that will be used in a feature film has safely returned back down to Earth, marking a milestone moment in the world film industry.

First ever movie footage shot in space, film crew safely returns home

After training for just four months, filmmaker Klim Shipenko, actress Yulia Peresild, and cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky took off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station for twelve days. The space film crew shot scenes for an upcoming movie about a doctor that is sent into orbit to perform surgery on a cosmonaut that is in need of medical attention.

The space film crew safely touched down in the Kazakhstan steppes, and right after leaving the capsule, the landing site quickly became a film set for one of the film's closing scenes. Actress Yulia Peresild is the first actress in space and described her experience to RT, saying, "While you're in low gravity, you feel like a feather, so everything's very heavy now - my head's very heavy, my arms, my legs... Everything's a little dizzy." The mission was a joint effort between Russia's television Channel 1 and the Russian Space Agency.

Continue reading: First ever movie footage shot in space, film crew safely returns home (full post)

Solar storm hits Earth, sounds of its impact recorded for the 1st time

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 5:32 AM CDT

For the first time, researchers have captured the sounds of a solar storm from the Sun impacting Earth's magnetic field.

Solar storm hits Earth, sounds of its impact recorded for the 1st time

The sounds were released by the European Space Agency (ESA) back in 2019, and according to the press release, the song comes from waves that are generated in Earth's magnetic field when charged particles from the Sun slammed into it. Lucile Turc, a former ESA research fellow, led a team on the research and used data from the Cluster Science Archive, which consists of four spacecrafts that orbit Earth-observing our planet's magnetic field.

The orbit of these spacecrafts takes them through what is known as "foreshock", which is the first layer of Earth's magnetic field. Between 2001 and 2005, the spacecrafts flew through six solar storm collisions and recorded the waves of the impact. Researchers then converted these frequencies to audio, and the result is somewhat eerie sci-fi sound that is commonly used in movies. For more information on this story, check out this link here.

Continue reading: Solar storm hits Earth, sounds of its impact recorded for the 1st time (full post)

Asteroids 500+ feet in diameter are fast-approaching Earth very soon

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 5:02 AM CDT

NASA's asteroid trackers are indicating that multiple asteroids will approach Earth in the next few weeks, some close to the size of the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt.

Asteroids 500+ feet in diameter are fast-approaching Earth very soon

For reference, the Great Pyramid of Giza has a diameter of 756 feet, and according to NASA's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies, Asteroid 2021 SM3 with a diameter of 525 feet passed by Earth just this Friday at a distance of 3.5 million miles. This asteroid was only first discovered a few weeks ago, according to CBS News. For those that don't know, a near-Earth object (NEO) are comets and asteroids that have been pushed into Earth's neighborhood by the gravity of other large-mass celestial body's such as nearby planets.

NASA researchers believe that NEOs hold the secrets for the evolution of our solar system as they formed from untouched debris when the solar system was first developing 4.6 billion years ago. NASA's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies said, "If we wish to know the composition of the primordial mixture from which the planets formed, then we must determine the chemical constituents of the leftover debris from this formation process - the comets and asteroids."

Continue reading: Asteroids 500+ feet in diameter are fast-approaching Earth very soon (full post)

NASA's Mars rover is at it again, captures something 'spectacular'

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 4:33 AM CDT

NASA has released a new image captured by its Mars rover named Perseverance, showing off an incredible view of an area in the Jezero Crater.

NASA's Mars rover is at it again, captures something 'spectacular'

The image is a brand new panorama of the South Seitah area located in the Jezero Crater, where Perseverance is currently exploring. Researchers selected the Jezero Crater for its potential to contain evidence of past life on the planet as well as its geological potential as it contains some of the oldest rocks that will allow researchers to understand more about Mars' past when studied.

The image is a mosaic piece that is comprised of 84 separate images that were taken with Perseverance's Mastcam-Z instrument. According to NASA, the images were taken on September 12 when Perseverance was parked on an elevated overlook that is located just outside of its entry point into South Seitah. To view a full resolution version of the panoramic image, check out this link here.

Continue reading: NASA's Mars rover is at it again, captures something 'spectacular' (full post)

Hubble spots something on Jupiter that 'no one has ever seen before'

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 4:04 AM CDT

Astronomers have been observing Jupiter and its most notable attraction - the Great Red Spot for hundreds of years.

Hubble spots something on Jupiter that 'no one has ever seen before'

Jupiter's Great Red Spot is the largest storm in the solar system, stretching at one point 25,000 miles in diameter, or three times the diameter of Earth. The storm is located 22 degrees south of Jupiter's equator and is producing wind speeds of up to 268 miles per hour. Astronomers have been using NASA and the European Space Agency's Hubble Space Telescope to observe Jupiter's main attraction for more than a decade and have discovered that the wind speed on the outer edges of the Great Red Spot is increasing.

Between 2009 and 2020, the wind speed of the outer edges, described by researchers as the high-speed ring, has increased its speed by eight percent. According to Michael Wong of the University of California, Berkeley, who led the analysis, "When I initially saw the results, I asked, 'Does this make sense?' No one has ever seen this before. But this is something only Hubble can do. Hubble's longevity and ongoing observations make this revelation possible."

Continue reading: Hubble spots something on Jupiter that 'no one has ever seen before' (full post)

No end in sight to this volcanic eruption, 'tsunami' lava river video

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 3:33 AM CDT

A volcano on one of Spain's islands is spewing rivers of lava out in all directions. Shocking footage has captured the lava coating the surface of the island.

No end in sight to this volcanic eruption, 'tsunami' lava river video

The volcano is Spain's Cumbre Vieja volcano located on La Palma island. The volcano began erupting on September 19 and has continued erupting for four weeks. NBC News reports that authorities expect the lava flow to advance northwest beyond the designated evacuation zone. Authorities have stated that the temperature of the lava can reach up to 2,264 degrees Fahrenheit and that there is nothing that can be done to stop it.

Residents in the area have evacuated the affected area, but the lava is moving very quickly, covering between 1,640 to 2,300 feet per hour. So far, the eruption and the rivers of lava have destroyed more than 1,186 buildings in the area and have covered around two square miles of land. Many videos of the rivers of lava have been captured by the press, researchers, and residents in the area. If you are interested in watching a video for yourself, check out this link here.

Continue reading: No end in sight to this volcanic eruption, 'tsunami' lava river video (full post)

1874 image of lunar mountain versus how it actually looks today

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 3:03 AM CDT

Astronomers back in 1974 decided to sketch what they thought the lunar mountain named Mons "Pico" would look like if they were standing in front of it.

1874 image of lunar mountain versus how it actually looks today

Mons Pico is a solitary lunar mountain that is located in the northern part of the Mare Imbrium basin. The mountain is very reflective and is known as a bright lunar object. The peak comes in at the height of 7,874 feet, and when blasted with sunlight, it can cause massive shadows across the lunar surface. Astronomers in 1874 were able to view the mountain but weren't able to get an idea of what it looked like if they were standing on the lunar surface looking at it.

So, they decided to draw it. Above is a sketch of Pico, with the caption stating, "An ideal sketch of "Pico," an isolated lunar mountain 8,000 feet high, as it would probably appear if seen by a spectator located on the Moon." Unfortunately, to the astronomers/artists that drew this sketch, their assumptions about the mountain weren't accurate. Below is an image of what Pico looks like today, and as you can see, the two images are very different. While the sketch from 1874 isn't accurate, the measurement for the height of the mountain is, which is certainly something to commend for the times it was estimated.

Continue reading: 1874 image of lunar mountain versus how it actually looks today (full post)

Sun shoots solar eruption at Earth, NASA confirmed its arrival

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 2:33 AM CDT

Last week, a large amount of solar material erupted from our star's surface, which then traveled through space, reaching Earth a few days later.

Sun shoots solar eruption at Earth, NASA confirmed its arrival

For those that are unaware of this event, the eruption happened on October 9, 2021, causing a coronal mass ejection (CME) blast to hit Earth on October 12. So, what does this mean exactly? Researchers measure the disturbance in Earth's magnetic field by solar wind using the Kp index metric. The levels range from 0, which is considered "quiet," to 9, which is regarded as "intense". The CME that arrived last week elevated the Kp index to a 6, which is considered mild-moderate.

The CME blast was associated with a solar flare that happened from Active Region 2882 that peaked on October 9 at 6:38 UTC. The solar flare was categorized as an M-class, and much like the Richter scale used to measure earthquakes, M-class solar flares are a tenth the size and intensity of the X-class flares. For example, M2 flares are twice as powerful as an M1. NASA's space instruments measured the speed of the solar wind from the eruption to be 610 miles per second, according to NASA's Moon to Mars Space Weather Operations Office.

Continue reading: Sun shoots solar eruption at Earth, NASA confirmed its arrival (full post)

Harvard professor claims our universe may have been created by aliens

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2021 2:04 AM CDT

A distinguished Harvard professor has speculated that the Milky Way universe could have been created in a lab by an advanced alien species.

Harvard professor claims our universe may have been created by aliens

Abraham (Avi) Loeb is a best-selling author and former head of Harvard's astronomy department and is known for theories such as alien civilizations not being able to reply to our messages for 3,000 years and Oumuamua possibly being an alien spacecraft. Loeb is more than qualified to speculate these wild theories, and recently he published an op-ed in Scientific American that explores the possibility of the universe merely being a lab experiment by an "advanced technological civilization."

According to Loeb, "Since our universe has a flat geometry with a zero net energy, an advanced civilization could have developed a technology that created a baby universe out of nothing through quantum tunneling." Adding, "This possible origin story unifies the religious notion of a creator with the secular notion of quantum gravity. We do not possess a predictive theory that combines the two pillars of modern physics: quantum mechanics and gravity. But a more advanced civilization might have accomplished this feat and mastered the technology of creating baby universes."

Continue reading: Harvard professor claims our universe may have been created by aliens (full post)