Internet Browsers News - Page 4

The latest and most important Internet Browsers news - Page 4.

'How to move to Canada' Google searches spike after Trump state wins

Sean Ridgeley | Thu, Mar 3 2016 3:01 PM CST

Donald Trump won primaries in seven states during this week's Super Tuesday, which seems to have prompted many Americans to immediately consider refuge in Canada. The evidence lies with Google, where searches for "how can I move to Canada" spiked by 350% four hours after polls closed, and 1000% by midnight. (Protip from a Canadian: moving here is not easy.)

'How to move to Canada' Google searches spike after Trump state wins | TweakTown.com

Additionally, the Government of Canada's immigration and citizenship page was slow loading or not loading at all for many visitors. At around midnight ET, a message on the website read, "You may experience delays while using the website. We are working to resolve this issue. Thank you for your patience."

Continue reading: 'How to move to Canada' Google searches spike after Trump state wins (full post)

Opera 37 almost finished, comes with a few good surprises too

Jeff Williams | Thu, Feb 18 2016 11:07 AM CST

Opera is almost at version 37.0 and is adamant about continuing to innovate in the browser realm despite the fact that a Chinese company is on the verge of buying the parent company, Opera Software. Version 37.0 is supposed to have a few fun surprises in the final version, things that aren't mentioned in any logs whatsoever.

Opera 37 almost finished, comes with a few good surprises too | TweakTown.com

The focus is on fixing a tremendous amount of bugs that have been found and adding in a few much needed changes to keep it competitve, such as smooth scrolling. But there'll be more too. "Now we are preparing small surprise for you, or actually, two, if we manage to fix everything on time. You will not find it in changelog, not even in the flags," Błażej Kaźmierczak said in an official blog post.

If you'd like to participate in the beta, with it's clean interface and rather quick browsing engine, you can download it here. Just know that it's not quite production ready yet, even though it's in great shape. The interface and intuitive way in which you interact with it is a surprise given the last time I played with it nearly three year ago. They've stepped up their game quite a bit!

Continue reading: Opera 37 almost finished, comes with a few good surprises too (full post)

Chrome now warns you about websites with deceptive download links

Sean Ridgeley | Thu, Feb 4 2016 3:08 PM CST

After blocking auto-play flash ads back in September and "social engineering attacks" in November, Chrome will now throw up a full page warning (pictured below) when you arrive at a page with deceptive download links and ads (like those that tell you to 'click this link' to clean your viruses). Well, sometimes, maybe: the new feature of sorts will be likely be rolled out gradually.

Chrome now warns you about websites with deceptive download links | TweakTown.com

The warning represents an expansion of Google's Safe Browsing, which warned you about malware and such.

It must be noted deceptive ads like this can be difficult for webmasters to control, as they are often generated by random ad servers. If nothing else, this could well discourage ad providers from creating these type of ads in the first place. With Chrome's massive browser share, it's not hard to believe.

Continue reading: Chrome now warns you about websites with deceptive download links (full post)

Opera 35 adds tab muting, overhauls download manager

Sean Ridgeley | Wed, Feb 3 2016 4:07 PM CST

Opera 35 for desktops and laptops is out, and with it comes a couple new juicy features as well as some small but appreciable tweaks.

Opera 35 adds tab muting, overhauls download manager | TweakTown.com

First, the now standard tab muting feature has been added. This is very handy for when a tab plays sounds unexpectedly, or when you want to silence a tab to listen to something else or just to have quiet. Simply click the volume icon and the sound is immediately off.

Next is the overhauled download manager. The new interface looks very slick with functionality to match. The categories menu on the left will prove very useful for when you've been downloading a lot on a given day or if you're the lazy type and don't clear your download history much or at all. Additionally, there's now a warning in place when exiting the browser while downloading something.

Continue reading: Opera 35 adds tab muting, overhauls download manager (full post)

Microsoft's Edge web browser reportedly saving private browsing data

Anthony Garreffa | Thu, Jan 28 2016 8:24 PM CST

We all know about the security and privacy issues surrounding Windows 10, but the latest look into the Edge browser might scare people off - and if anything, bar them from using Microsoft's nifty new Windows 10 web browser.

Microsoft's Edge web browser reportedly saving private browsing data | TweakTown.com

Thanks to security researcher Ashish Singh, we're finding out that private browsing data using Edge's InPrivate mode might not be deleting the web browsing history - that's meant to be completely private - after all. According to Singh, who looked at the "Container_n" table that stores web history, anyone can see the tabs that were opened while browsing the web using the InPrivate mode in the Edge browser. Eek.

Singh explains: "Therefore any skilled investigator can easily spot the difference and get concrete evidence against a person's wrongdoings. Plenty of artifacts are maintained by the browser, which makes examination quite easy. However, there are stages where evidence is not so easy to find. The not-so-private browsing featured by Edge makes its very purpose seem to fail". The Verge was able to find evidence in the WebCache of a site visited while using Edge and using InPrivate mode, using Singh's method. Microsoft told The Verge: "We recently became aware of a report that claims InPrivate tabs are not working as designed and we are committed to resolving this as quickly as possible".

Continue reading: Microsoft's Edge web browser reportedly saving private browsing data (full post)

Microsoft recommends updating to IE 11 even if you don't use IE

Sean Ridgeley | Wed, Jan 13 2016 4:33 PM CST

Microsoft finally retired Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 yesterday, after previously encouraging everyone to upgrade to Internet Explorer 11.

Microsoft recommends updating to IE 11 even if you don't use IE | TweakTown.com

There's another reason to do so, even if you don't use Internet Explorer, according to Microsoft Senior Software Development Consultant Pat Altimore, who notes components of the browser are tied into the operating system.

"There are many components that constitute the browser," he writes. "Most of the components are part of the operating system including the JavaScript / HTML rendering engine (MSHTML.dll), the Web Browser control (ieframe.dll), and the Windows Internet Protocol Handler (WinInet.dll). The browser application (IExplore.exe) uses these OS components for script execution, rendering, HTTP requests, etc. When you upgrade the browser, you potentially upgrade all of these components."

Continue reading: Microsoft recommends updating to IE 11 even if you don't use IE (full post)

Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 retired today

Sean Ridgeley | Tue, Jan 12 2016 12:04 PM CST

As it was forewarned last week, Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 are retired as of today; Microsoft will be focusing on Internet Explorer 11 and its Edge browser going forward.

Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 retired today | TweakTown.com

You can still use the old browsers of course, but you'll be vulnerable to viruses and the like, and be nagged by Microsoft to update. Head here to download Internet Explorer 11 or Edge, or update through your browser (older versions may not let you, though).

Continue reading: Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 retired today (full post)

Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 being retired next week

Sean Ridgeley | Thu, Jan 7 2016 2:04 AM CST

Microsoft is finally retiring old versions of Internet Explorer (IE) this month. As of January 12, IE 8, 9, and 10 will kick the bucket, ceasing to receive updates or official support, thereby leaving you in the cold and vulnerable to viruses and such, but allowing developers to further focus on newer technology. IE 11 will still be on the menu for the foreseeable future, and then of course there's Edge.

Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 being retired next week | TweakTown.com

If you are an old fogey determined to not upgrade or just don't even know how (if you're on this website, this probably isn't you, but hey), the company encourages you to do so to get the benefit of "improved security, increased performance, better backward compatibility, and support for the web standards that power today's websites and services." A final update for the aging browsers will nag you to do so, as well.

Continue reading: Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 being retired next week (full post)

Mozilla launches A-Frame, capable of creating VR websites easily

Anthony Garreffa | Sat, Dec 19 2015 6:35 AM CST

Mozilla has just launched A-Frame, an open-source framework that uses HTML5 instead of WebGL. This means A-Frame is compatible across iPhones, Google Cardboard devices, the Oculus Rift DK2, and Android support "coming soon".

Mozilla launches A-Frame, capable of creating VR websites easily | TweakTown.com

A-Frame will also support the HTC Vive, which is coming out in April 2016 with HTC teasing that together with Valve they have made "a very, very big technological breakthrough" with Vive. Back to A-Frame, with Mozilla's MozVR team saying: "Beginners start with easily understood primitives like cubes, videos, models, and skies. Advanced users can use JavaScript to imperatively create dynamic and interactive scenes or dive into its underlying entity-component system, a design pattern popular in the game industry that favors composition over inheritance".

Continue reading: Mozilla launches A-Frame, capable of creating VR websites easily (full post)

Edge add-on support delayed to 2016

Sean Ridgeley | Thu, Oct 22 2015 5:15 PM CDT

Microsoft's Edge browser has a lot going for it, but it is missing a component many consider key to the modern browser: add-ons (or extensions, plugins -- whatever you want to call them). It's been stated support for them would come in 2015, but that's now officially been delayed to next year.

Edge add-on support delayed to 2016 | TweakTown.com

Today Microsoft released this statement on the matter: "We're committed to providing customers with a personalized web experience, which is why bringing extensions to Microsoft Edge continues to be a high priority. We're actively working to develop a secure extension model to make the safest and most reliable browser for our customers, and look forward to sharing more in a future Windows 10 update in 2016."

Edge, like every other browser, hasn't seen much use compared to the ever-dominant Chrome. This delay, necessary though it may be, further hurts Edge's chance of becoming a significant force in the crowded browser market. On the bright side, Insiders will get to try out add-ons before they go public, though when exactly is not yet known.

Continue reading: Edge add-on support delayed to 2016 (full post)

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