NASA showcases the incredible power of Webb being able to see faint stars

NASA has posted an update that showcases the quality of the James Webb Space Telescope's instrument and how they can observe faint stars in deep space.

NASA showcases the incredible power of Webb being able to see faint stars
Published Nov 12, 2022 2:46 AM CST
1 minute & 17 seconds read time

NASA has taken to its blog to share an image that showcases a beautiful side-by-side comparison between the James Webb Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera.

Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (left) and the James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (right) of the dwarf galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM)

Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Array Camera (left) and the James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera (right) of the dwarf galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM)

NASA has posted a new blog where it details images of a dwarf galaxy called WLM, which is quite close to our Milky Way galaxy at approximately 3 million light-years from Earth.

NASA spoke with Kristen McQuinn of Rutgers University, one of the lead scientists on Webb Early Release Science (ERS) program that focusses on stellar populations, who explained that WLM is a prime candidate for scientists to test theory theories of galaxy formation as WLM is believed to be barely influenced by other galaxies.

McQuinn describes WLM is isolated, but this is a good quality as many other galaxies are intertwined and entangled with other galaxies, making them harder to study.

"We can see a myriad of individual stars of different colors, sizes, temperatures, ages, and stages of evolution; interesting clouds of nebular gas within the galaxy; foreground stars with Webb's diffraction spikes; and background galaxies with neat features like tidal tails. It's really a gorgeous image.

And, of course, the view is far deeper and better than our eyes could possibly see. Even if you were looking out from a planet in the middle of this galaxy, and even if you could see infrared light, you would need bionic eyes to be able to see what Webb sees," said McQuinn.

NEWS SOURCE:blogs.nasa.gov

Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed 100s of new tech products and kept us informed daily on the latest science and space news. Jak's love for science, space, and technology, and, more specifically, PC gaming, began at 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. Ever since that day, Jak fell in love with games and the progression of the technology industry in all its forms. Instead of typical FPS, Jak holds a very special spot in his heart for RTS games.

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