The multiverse was just used to explain how our universe came to be

Scientists have proposed a new multiverse model that explains the Higgs boson's mass and solves the strong CP symmetry problem.

@AdamHuntTT
Published Fri, Jan 14 2022 1:30 AM CST   |   Updated Wed, Feb 9 2022 3:48 PM CST

A new paper published in Physical Review Letters explains the theoretical model.

The multiverse was just used to explain how our universe came to be 01 | TweakTown.com

Scientists from CERN have proposed a theory that explains the small mass of the Higgs boson and solves a problem with the theory of the strong force. The Higgs boson is an elementary particle with a mass of ~125 GeV and has prompted scientists to theorize why it is so light. The strong force is one of the four fundamental forces of nature and binds quarks together to form subatomic particles like protons and neutrons.

The theory uses a multiverse model to propose many different universes, each with a Higgs boson of a different mass. At the birth of these universes, those with more massive Higgs bosons would collapse quickly, and the surviving universes would have a light Higgs boson, of which our universe would be one.

The model also includes two new particles, which would solve the strong CP problem, derived from the theory of quantum chromodynamics. The proposed particles would make strong interactions CP symmetric and could also help explain dark matter.

"Each model comes with perks and limitations. Our model stands out because it is simple, generic and it solves these two seemingly unrelated puzzles at once. And it predicts distinctive features in data from experiments that aim to search for dark matter or for an electric dipole moment in the neutron and other hadrons," said Daniele Teresi of CERN.

You can read more from the paper here.

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NEWS SOURCES:phys.org, doi.org

Adam grew up watching his dad play Turok 2 and Age of Empires on a PC in his computer room, and learned a love for video games through him. Adam was always working with computers, which helped build his natural affinity for working with them, leading to him building his own at 14, after taking apart and tinkering with other old computers and tech lying around. Adam has always been very interested in STEM subjects, and is always trying to learn more about the world and the way it works.

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