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SSD Consistency Testing - 18 Drives Tested for Real-World Performance - Benchmarks - Test System Setup

SSD Consistency Testing - 18 Drives Tested for Real-World Performance
With a new test in hand via Futuremark, we look at worst case and recovery performance to find real differences in SSD performance.
| Editorials in Storage | Posted: Feb 25, 2014 11:08 pm

Desktop Test System

 

TweakTown image content/6/1/6104_50_ssd_consistency_testing_18_drives_tested_for_real_world_performance.png

 

All tests were on our primary SSD test system that uses an Intel Core i7 Haswell processor and an ASUS Z87 motherboard.

 

Let's take a look at how the new test works.

 

1. Precondition phase

 

1. Write to the drive sequentially through up to the reported capacity with random data, write size of 256*512=131072 bytes.

2. Write it through a second time (to take care of overprovisioning).

 

2. Degradation phase

 

1. Run writes of random size between 8*512 and 2048*512 bytes on random offsets for 10 minutes.

2. Run performance test (one pass only). The result is stored in secondary results with name prefix degrade_result_X where X is a counter.

3. Repeat 1 and 2 for 8 times, and on each pass increase the duration of random writes by 5 minutes

 

3. Steady state phase

 

1. Run writes of random size between 8*512 and 2048*512 bytes on random offsets for final duration achieved in degradation phase.

2. Run performance test (one pass only). The result is stored in secondary results with name prefix steady_result_X where X is a counter.

3. Repeat 1 and 2 for 5 times.

 

The first page of our results comes from the steady state phase and this shows worst-case performance for a consumer. Other tests in the past used 4K writes to show worst case performance, but we feel that workload is better suited for enterprise workloads and do not represent conditions a consumer SSD will encounter.

 

1. Recovery phase

 

1. Idle for 5 minutes.

2. Run performance test (one pass only). The result is stored in secondary result with name recovery_result_X where X is a counter.

3. Repeat 1 and 2 for 5 times.

 

Our second two results come from the recovery phase. The first shows performance just 5 minutes after the steady state tests. Each test run does take around an hour and twenty minutes, so simply stating 5 minutes later isn't accurate for each of the ten tests.

 

The third test shows recovery performance after five test runs with five minutes between each test. If you leave your computer on all of the time, this is the level of performance you should expect from your drive. The drive is able to recover on its own. This is the amount of degraded performance for most of us.

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