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Antec Performance One Series P280 Super Mid Tower Chassis Review - The Build and Finished Product

Reworking and rethinking a classic of yester year, the Performance One series gets a new addition with the P280 - Antec's throwback to the iconic P180.

| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Nov 15, 2011 1:07 pm
TweakTown Rating: 95%Manufacturer: Antec

The Build and Finished Product

 

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With the front door closed there really isn't a thing that changes about the front of the Antec P280 when fully assembled, and for someone who typically isn't a fan of front doors on cases, this one is surely growing on me.

 

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Something I wasn't fully aware of in the beginning was that the front has a double hinge. Not only will the door open 180° from its closed position, but a second hinge allows for another 90° of motion so that the door can open until it meets the side panel of the case.

 

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Typically in a mod tower chassis, this ATX motherboard wouldn't resemble a m-ATX build, but that says a lot for the room inside of this super mid tower. I was able to house everything easily with plenty of room left over for larger boards, water cooling, or more and even much longer graphics cards.

 

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Above the motherboard there is roughly 38mm of room from the top of the board to the bottom of the fans that are installed. This will allow for most single thickness dual 120mm radiators to fit without issue and it won't block any of the view of your motherboard.

 

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In the back there isn't anything that comes to mind that was of any issue. The I/O dust cover went in solidly, the cards went in and secured easily with the thumbscrews, and the PSU aligned as it should.

 

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With as much room as is offered here, you don't have to be too particular about the wiring, but I still try to keep it clean. I will say it again here, three or four more inches of the I/O switch and lighting wires would have been gladly accepted. With the way the door hinge in the front of the chassis, thicker wires will press into place as you swing the panel into place.

 

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All closed up and with the power applied, even with everything lit up in the front I/O panel, the only addition is the tiny blue LEDs. The idea is to not have something noticeable in noise levels or aesthetics. Even if you do see it sitting there, this isn't a chassis that screams "look at me, look at me", it's more of a casual "hey there, don't mind me"!

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