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Internet & Websites Posts - Page 72

Twitter to let you download and search your Tweets sometime in the future

A feature requested by many Twitter users, and partially offered by other services, will finally be offered directly by Twitter some time in the future. "We're working on a tool to let users export all of their tweets," Mr. Costolo said in a meeting with reporters and editors at The New York Times on Monday. "You'll be able to download a file of them."

 

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However, while users will be able to go through their own Tweets, as of right now, there are no plans for a feature to allow users to dig through all of the Tweets on the site. He explained that the search problems are very different and you "can't just put three engineers on it." As of right now, there is no timeline for when a search or download feature would be available.

 

EU law already provides this option for users who really want to have a copy of their Tweets and several users have taken advantage of it. EU law requires Twitter to provide a copy of all data they have stored about a user. Those who have exercised that right have found that it includes your account, tweets, favorites, direct messages, saved searches and more information about you, delivered in a ZIP file.

Spotify celebrates its first birthday in America

Spotify is marking its one-year anniversary in the United States by releasing an infographic with numbers about the service. It contains some incredible numbers and would appear to be a success due to all the big numbers. First, users have listened to over 13 BILLION tracks. This works out to around 27,000 years or 23.7 million man-hours of listening.

 

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Users of the service have also shared nearly 28,000,000 million tracks. 55% were shared via Facebook and 41% were shared via Spotify itself. For those of you who do not know about Spotify, they offer unlimited music streaming for $5/month or $10/month if you want to have access on a mobile device. They also offer a free service, with some restrictions of course.

Declaration of Internet Freedom: will you sign it?

In another attempt to make a pointless statement towards Washington D.C., a group of websites and privacy organizations have come together to form the Declaration of Internet Freedom. The Declaration of Internet Freedom is the start of something bigger, a movement to uphold and ensure some basic principles, much like the Declaration of Independence was.

 

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"We've seen how the Internet has been under attack from various directions, and we recognize that it's time to make that stop," said TechDirt, a site involved with the new movement. "The Internet is an incredible platform that we want to grow and to thrive, and thus, a very large coalition got together to produce the following document as a starting point, hoping to kick off a much larger discussion which we hope you'll join in."

 

As it stands currently, the Declaration of Internet Freedom is composed of 5 basic values:

 

  1. Expression: Don't censor the Internet.
  2. Access: Promote universal access to fast and affordable networks.
  3. Openness: Keep the Internet an open network where everyone is free to connect, communicate, write, read, watch, speak, listen, learn, create, and innovate.
  4. Innovation: Protect the freedom to innovate and create without permission. Don't block new technologies, and don't punish innovators for their users' actions.
  5. Privacy: Protect privacy and defend everyone's ability to control how their data and devices are used.

Continue reading 'Declaration of Internet Freedom: will you sign it?' (full post)

Apple changes their website, doesn't state OS X is "virus-proof" anymore

Over the last few months Apple have been getting hit with negative press over their OS' security, with hackers and the such gaining access to user files in less than thirty seconds, which is a concern as Apple used to always push that their operating system never got PC viruses.

 

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But, Apple continued to run with the "I'm a Mac and I'm a PC" campaign, where they focused on the "fact" that Windows-based systems got viruses, while OS X-based systems couldn't. But now that we know that is complete BS, Apple have done what they do best, marketing and using its legal system to remove any proof so that potential liability for the company is wiped away.

 

As you can see in the picture above, Apple used to state that a "Mac isn't susceptible to the thousands of viruses plaguing Windows-based computers. That's thanks to built-in defences in Mac OS X that keep you safe, without any work on your part". So Apple more or less said that you just run the OS and you're protected, but for years we've known this isn't true.

Continue reading 'Apple changes their website, doesn't state OS X is "virus-proof" anymore' (full post)

Apple open iTunes Store's in Hong Kong, Taiwan and 10 other Asia-Pacific territories

If you're based in Hong Kong, Taiwan, or a bunch of other territories then you'll be happy to know that Apple have just opened the flood gates to the iTunes Store.

 

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Even though these territories have had the App Store for a while, now you can grab music and movies, too. Apple singles out Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan, as well as Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.

 

The above-mentioned cities will get local content, as well as the International hits. Music and movies are not the only thing that have been made available, iTunes in the Cloud re-downloads as well as iTunes Match subscriptions in every country.

Why YouTube views seemingly pause at 301

Have you ever noticed that the views on a newly viral YouTube video seemingly pause at 301? If so, I imagine you've wondered why that is. Well, previously it had just been one of those many internet myths that seemingly don't have an answer. However, thanks to YouTube product manager Ted Hamilton, we now have an answer.

 

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The basic reason behind the views freezing at 301 is the following: Once a video hits 300 views, subsequent views are collected and sent to YouTube's central servers for verification. This verification process takes about one-half day to a day and checks that the views weren't racked up by a bot. Mr. Hamilton explains:

 

Views, as mentioned, are a currency. When you have a video with very small amount of views you don't need to be too careful about what the view was. However, once it gets to be above 300 and beyond, this currency, we really need to verify and make sure that the number is what it purports to be. So this means that we have to go through a statistical verification process. And that statistical verification process actually takes some time. And thus we go from incrementing one by one, to then saying, OK, now we're incrementing in batch. And all of these views we're adding on have been verified by YouTube to be real views. We are preventing things like bots to go in and add a bunch of views to a video.

Continue reading 'Why YouTube views seemingly pause at 301' (full post)

70 percent of teenagers hid their online behavior from parents, a new study shows

A new study by McAfee is showing what teenagers are really doing online and the results are a bit scary. An incredible 70 percent of teenagers in the study say they hid at least part of their online activity and behavior from their parents. What they are hiding could be even more shocking, especially if you are a parent.

 

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43 percent of the surveyed teens accessed some form of simulated violence while surfing the web, and likely more worrying for parents is the fact that 32 percent view nude content or pornography on the internet. Even worse yet is that half of the parents believe that their children are telling them everything they are doing online.

 

"While it is not necessarily surprising that teens are engaging in the same types of rebellious behaviors online that they exhibit offline, it is surprising how disconnected their parents are," Stanley Holditch, Online Safety Expert for McAfee, said today in a statement. "There is a major increase in the number of teens finding ways to hide what they do online from their parents, as compared to the 2010 study."

 

The study also found that 15 percent of teens had hacked a social networking account and 9 percent have hacked into another's e-mail account. 31 percent have pirated a movie or music. How are these kids covering their tracks? 53 percent say they clear their browser history and 46 percent minimize their screens when parents walk by. About a quarter admit to lying or omitting details about online activity.

Bing Maps gets 165TB of new data, more than all previous updates combined

Bing Maps, the major alternative to Google's mapping service, has received a massive update of satellite imagery today. The update consists of 165TB of new data, which, incredibly, is more data than all previous updates combined. Prior to this update, Bing had only received a running total of 129TB of satellite imagery.

 

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The new imagery includes satellite imagery as well as global ortho photography. The update covers parts of Americas, Africa, Australia, Europe and Asia, and, amazingly, covers almost 38 million square kilometers of the Earth. "Just this month, Bing Imagery Technologies hit a significant milestone by completing 100% of aerial photography over the United States," the companys says. "The photography in Europe is slated to be finished by this fall and all updated imagery should be published by the end of 2012."

 

Let's take a step back and realize just how much data it would take for imagery that covered the entire Earth. It was 165TB for only 38 million square kilometers of area. The Earth has a surface area of around 510 square kilometers, so a couple of quick calculations later, we yield that it would require around 2200TBs. Wow.

Continue reading 'Bing Maps gets 165TB of new data, more than all previous updates combined' (full post)

Google Search allows you filter out the pages you have already visited

Here's a cool new tip and trick for you Google searchers out there, which, judging by the market share, is most of you. If you're anything like me, you're not one to clutter up your favorites list with a bunch of bookmarks. The only downside to this is finding that really informative website you found yesterday while Google'ing.

 

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Have no fear, as Google is using the vast amount of information about you to help you! As long as you are logged in to your Google account, you can filter the results to show only pages you haven't visited or only pages you have visited. There are other filter options as well, but these are the coolest.

 

After searching on Google, click on "Show Search Tools" on the left hand side of the page. This will pull up a menu with various options. On that menu, all you have to do is select "Visited Pages" and only pages that you have clicked on will show up. Nifty! But what if I want to find something new? Select the option "Not yet visited" and pages you haven't visited will show up.

 

Some of you probably already know this, but for those of you who don't, it's a great tool to add to your Google'ing arsenal.

Google employee proposes error code '451' to signal internet censorship

As if we don't already have enough internet codes, it appears there will soon need to be one more. A Google employee has offered up one option for the code that will surely soon be necessary. Tim Bray has proposed that the new code be '451' in order to honor the late author Ray Bradbury, whose science fiction classic Fahrenheit 451 warned of a dystopian world defined by government-imposed censorship.

 

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"We can never do away entirely with legal restrictions on freedom of speech. On the other hand, I feel that when such restrictions are imposed, they should be done so transparently; for example, most civilized people find Britain's system of superinjunctions loathsome and terrifying," said Bray in an interview with the Guardian.

 

"While we may agree on the existence of certain restrictions, we should be nervous whenever we do it; thus the reference to the dystopian vision of Fahrenheit 451 may be helpful. Also, since the Internet exists in several of the many futures imagined by Bradbury, it would be nice for a tip of the hat in his direction from the Net, in the year of his death."

 

The idea was inspired by someone else's blog post about how they received a '403: Forbidden' error when trying to access The Pirate Bay. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is set to consider it when they meet late next month. But of course, in life, there are no guarantees so they may decide not to adopt it for several reasons.

Continue reading 'Google employee proposes error code '451' to signal internet censorship' (full post)

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