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Thermaltake Armor A90 Mid Tower Chassis - Inside The Thermaltake Armor A90 Mid Tower Case

Utilizing the Element Series as a strong starting point, Thermaltake tweaks the ideas both inside and out to bring us the Armor A90.

| Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jun 17, 2010 3:38 pm
TweakTown Rating: 92%      Manufacturer: Thermaltake

Inside The Thermaltake Armor A90 Mid Tower Case

 

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Once you remove the armor from the outside, it exposes the heart of an Element case. All black, a drive assembly very similar to an Element with the spacing behind to hide wires. Again, I get why it's an Armor series, but I see more of the Element in here than the older Armor cases.

 

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The front of the A90's interior consists of the drive bays and tool-less mechanisms for each bay. On this side the locks unlock by sliding the center tab left, the whole assembly is hinged to flip up and out of the way while you slide in the drive, then just reverse the process to lock it in. The gap at the left is entirely open from the 5.25" drives on down to allow wiring to pass here to keep air flow maximized.

 

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The motherboard tray has a large hole for CPU back plate access and is clearly labeled for motherboard installation. There isn't much to be had for holes in the tray for wires, so a bit of creativity is needed to make this a really clean build. On the floor there is a movable support bar for the PSU. Two screws go in from the bottom and allow the bar to go in one of many positions available.

 

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At the top you will find a 200mm, blue LED, clear fan screwed to the inside. This will handle removing anything that the rear 120mm doesn't get to.

 

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There will be no issues getting any of the front I/O wiring where it belongs, as you can see there is quite a bit of length supplied from Thermaltake. From left to right, you will see a 3-pin fan connector for the rear fan, and a 4-pin Molex connection to power the 200mm up top. Then we see the HA and AC'97 audio and one of the USB 2.0 connections. The last group has all the LED and switch wiring, the other USB 2.0 connection and the a-SATA connector.

 

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Around the back side of the motherboard tray, you will find there isn't a lot of room to run wiring behind the motherboard, but there sure is a deep pocket near the front that will hide quite a bit of wiring. For those without modular power supplies, this is where you want to go with your excess connections.

 

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The front bezel pulls off with a tug at the bottom, as do most of them. In the chassis you can see the 120mm, blue LED fan that is supplied, and the area above that will accept another 120mm fan. If you choose to, this fan can be removed and a 200mm fan be placed here for the ultimate in intake. Behind the bezel aside from the tabs that allow the bay covers to come off, there is a removable dust filter here, too.

 

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