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Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 29

NASA JPL lets you walk the surface of Mars with Oculus Rift and Omni

Oculus Rift, apart from being awesome, is being used everywhere, but one of the best uses for it so far has to be NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's super immersive space exploration, which lets you walk the surface of Mars.

 

 

The NASA JPL team were pumped for Rift when they first used it at PAX last year, signing up for a developer kit right away. Engadget interviewed Human Interfaces Engineer, Victor Luo, who said they added terrain imagery that was snapped from satellites so that they could actually "walk" on the red planet using an Xbox controller "with up to 25 centimeters per pixel."

 

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Luo thought it would be great to actually physically 'walk' on Mars, so they contacted Virtuix Omni to get one of their treadmills. The Virtuix team were near the JPL labs when E3 2013 was cranking along, and hand delivered an Omni to the excited people at NASA's JPL laboratories. The team hooked the unit up and were able to "wander around" the surface of Mars. Incredible.

Canada reaches for deep space with next-gen robotic arm

Canada's Next-Generation Canadarm (NGC) have developed a new version of their robotic space arm that will help out with space exploration. The program itself is designed to support missions in both low-Earth orbit, and deep space.

 

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The next-gen robotic arm will be used for jobs from repairing communications satellites to helping out on manned missions to the moon, asteroids, Mars, and other vast parts of the universe. Alain Ouellet, the Director of Space Exploration Development at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) said:

 

"With the retirement of the space shuttle, a new generation of crewed space exploration vehicles will soon become available. However, these new vehicles are much smaller in size compared to the space shuttle, and therefore there is a need to adapt the robotic arm technology developed for the shuttle and the International Space Station."

Continue reading 'Canada reaches for deep space with next-gen robotic arm' (full post)

New tooth sensor tells your doctor if you're smoking or overeating

If you thought NSA's PRISM system was invasive to your privacy, just wait until you hear what the National Taiwan University team has been up to. Lead by Hao-hua Chu, they've just tested prototypes of a new tooth sensor that is capable of detecting if you're smoking or overeating.

 

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The team tested them in eight people's dentures, with the sensor featuring accelerometers that are capable of detecting the difference between chewing, smoking, speaking and coughing, roughly 94% of the time. It can only get better, with next-gen versions possibly detecting the type of food you're eating, which would be a huge step for health.

 

The biggest issue is scientists first have to create an on-power power source, as the prototypes currently run from external batteries, and secondly mouth-safe Bluetooth connectivity so that it can transmit data to smartphones. The team are already talking about shrinking the tooth sensor down so that it could fit inside cavities or crowns.

ScienceFriday: Hubble captures breathtaking image of Comet ISON, one of the greatest comets humans will ever see

It has been several months since I have made a Science Friday post here at TweakTown and I have been wanting to bring it back. So many of you have mentioned how much you enjoyed them, so I am going to attempt to make 1-2 science related posts every Friday. Today, NASA released a breathtaking image of Comet ISON taken with the Hubble Space Telescope back on April 30. The image shows ISON streaking through our solar system with many stars and faint galaxies in the background.

 

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The image is comprised of five photos that the researchers at NASA stitched together to form such a wide field of view. "The result is part science, part art," Josh Sokol of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., which operates Hubble, wrote in a blog post last week. "It's a simulation of what our eyes, with their ability to dynamically adjust to brighter and fainter objects, would see if we could look up at the heavens with the resolution of Hubble."

 

Comet ISON, is a sungrazing comet discovered on September 21, 2012, by Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok. The discovery was made using a 0.4 meter--16 in--reflecting telescope. As the comet warms as it moves closer to the sun, its rate of sublimation (a process similar to evaporation in which solid matter transitions directly into gas) will increase. The comet will get brighter and its tail will grow longer. The comet is predicted to reach naked-eye visibility in November.

A group of MIT scientists have planted false memories in mice

Now this is a scary piece of news. A group of MIT researchers have successfully implanted false memories into the minds of test mice, with a study published in the journal, Science.

 

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The experiment was designed to look at the phenomenon known as "false memory syndrome", where the brain creates recollections of events that have never actually happened: you know, like seeing a black cat twice in The Matrix. By playing with the memory engram-bearing cells in the hippocampus, the MIT researchers convinced a bunch of mice that they had experienced shock to their feet, without physically doing anything different than just standing there.

 

Now, all this team has to do is sell me a dream pill that gives me the ability to "dream" some "memories". We could call it "iDream", should I go and get a patent on that?

Scientists finally capture video of the pitch dropping in 69-year-old Pitch Drop Experiment

86 years ago, the University of Queensland in Australia began conducting an experiment in which the flow rate of a piece of pitch was measured. For those of you who may not know what pitch is, it's a highly viscous liquid which, for all intents and purposes, appears to be solid. Bitumen is the most commonly used form and at room temperature, this tar pitch flows at a very slow rate sometimes taking up to a decade or more for a single drop to fall.

 

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The University of Queensland is not the only institution studying this phenomenon. Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland has also been conducting their own experiment since 1944. Finally after 69 long years, the first drop of pitch has finally fallen. The drop occurred on July 11, 2013 at 5 PM local time and webcams that were set up last April were on hand to catch this extremely rare occurrence.

 

While some of you may not understand the excitement, I find in things like this let me break down how many times human eyes have missed seeing this event take place. According to Prof. John Mainstone of the University of Queensland, he has missed several opportunities to witness the drop happening with his own eyes. First in 1979, Mainstone said that he skipped one of his usual Sunday campus visits and coincidentally the drop happened the same day. Then again in 1988, Mainstone left his lab to grab a snack and apparently missed the drop by just five minutes. Finally in 2000, fed up with missing the drop, Mainstone set up a camera but unfortunately a glitch at the moment of the drop prevented any video of the event occurring.

Continue reading 'Scientists finally capture video of the pitch dropping in 69-year-old Pitch Drop Experiment' (full post)

X-47B makes its first landing on an aircraft carrier, the aircraft just took a giant leap for unmannedkind

The Northrop Grumman-built X-47B is an unmanned drone, and it has completed its first successful landing on an aircraft carrier at sea. We reported on the X-47B being the first unmanned drone to take off from an aircraft carrier, but landing unmanned? Remarkable.

 

 

Considering aircraft carriers are constantly moving with the ocean waves, even an experienced pilot would have trouble landing on one. It's not an easy thing to do, but unmanned, run purely on technology, algorithms and equipment? That's quite an achievement. The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) is designed to fly mostly on its own, without much hands-on time from shipboard operators.

 

The precision landing was just that: precise. It is a huge step for multiple reasons, as this has been a procedure set in motion after quite a few years, and nearly a billion US dollars. On Wednesday, the X-47B made a 35-minute flight from the Navail Air Station at Patuxent River, Md., to the aircraft carrier, where it hooked onto the 3 wire with its tailhook and came to a perfect stop from a speed of approximately 145 knots in less than 350 feet.

Continue reading 'X-47B makes its first landing on an aircraft carrier, the aircraft just took a giant leap for unmannedkind' (full post)

Ever wanted access to your very own satellite orbiting the earth? Now you can have just that for a mere $250 per week

Traditionally, it has been pretty hard to get access to a satellite that is in orbit, but one California-based company is looking to change that. NanoSatisfi is developing small cube satellites that cost considerably less than $1 million to develop and launch, which is considerably less than traditional satellites that range anywhere from $500 million to several billion just for development.

 

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The satellite in question is what is known as an ArduSat which is a cube satellite based on the open source Arduino development platform. This satellite is made of the same stuff that you blink your LEDs with. The satellite contains multiple cameras, a Geiger counter, a magnetometer, as well as an ambient light sensor. The entire package measures just 10cm x 10cm x 10cm and weighs in at a mere 2.2 pounds.

 

Some you might remember the ArduSat from its Kickstarter campaign which raised more than $100,000 and went on to garner an additional $1.2 million from external investors. The satellite is set to launch on August 4 and for just $250 a week, any interested parties can borrow the tiny vessel and explore everything that outer space has to offer.

Continue reading 'Ever wanted access to your very own satellite orbiting the earth? Now you can have just that for a mere $250 per week' (full post)

SpaceTT: SpaceX's Grasshopper rocket launches to 1066ft and lands successfully

We know most of our readers enjoy SpaceX and space in general, so we thought you'd enjoy watching SpaceX's reusable Grasshopper rocket launch to 1,066 feet and return to its launch pad.

 

 

The video was shot from a hexacoptor hovering above the test flight. The actual test flight took place June 14, but the video was just recently released for all to watch. The Grasshopper is part of SpaceX's push to make use of reusable rockets. The company believes that reusable rockets are the future of space travel and that they will reduce the price of traveling to space.

 

SpaceX's CEO believes that it will cost $500,000 to move a family to Mars by 2029. Would you be willing to pay that?

Continue reading 'SpaceTT: SpaceX's Grasshopper rocket launches to 1066ft and lands successfully' (full post)

Microsoft are working on a technology that would see your smartphone detect your mood

Microsoft could be onto something important with their Microsoft Research Asia division, who are working on a technology that provides your smartphone with the ability to detect your mood.

 

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Not only that, it will detect your mood and post it to your social networks in real-time. If you thought the NSA PRISM system was bad, just wait until there's technology that posts to your Facebook wall that you're in a really bad mood. But, Microsoft researchers have said: "privacy concerns aside, these moods would enhance social networks by allowing users to share mood states automatically."

 

This would help users "know better how and when to communicate with others." I don't know about you, but I wouldn't want something detecting my mood all day every day, you wouldn't feel safe with your emotions at all.

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