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Internet Browsers Posts - Page 5

Opera releases beta version of Opera web browser for Android

Opera has released a completely redesigned version of its web browser that runs on Android, and is being billed by the company as "the best browser on Android." Opera says that they started from scratch to bring a fully native web browsing experience to your Android based smartphone.

 

 

Opera says that the new browser brings forth a new way to browse the web that is more elegant and efficient. The new Discover feature provides a panel in which you can read popular articles from the web based on your interest. Another new feature is "Speed Dial", a service that is similar to a bookmark folder, but streamlines the process of organizing favorited websites.

 

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Like similar browsers, the search and URL bar are now combined, tabbed browsing is present, and users are able to save websites to their phone for viewing when not connected to a data source. Browsing history has also been simplified making it easy for the end-user to quickly find and revisit previously viewed sites.

Continue reading 'Opera releases beta version of Opera web browser for Android' (full post)

Chrome 26 beta gets released, includes improved spell checking and more

Google have just pushed out Chrome 26 in beta form, which includes improved spell checking abilities with updated dictionaries and added support for Korean, Tamil and Albanian. You can also sync custom dictionaries across multiple devices.

 

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Added dictionaries aren't the only things Chrome 26 receives, support for grammar, homonym and context-sensitive checking, which is the same technology we see baked into Google search and Docs. The improved engine will correct proper nouns, such as the misspelling of Stephen Spielberg - whereas "Steven" is the correct way of spelling his name. This feature is currently locked to English users who have to enable the "Ask Google for suggestions" spell check option.

Continue reading 'Chrome 26 beta gets released, includes improved spell checking and more' (full post)

Microsoft finally releases Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, download it now

Internet Explorer 10 (IE10) has been available for Windows 8 since the OS launch, but Windows 7 users were stuck with IE9 until now. This morning Microsoft released Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, which brings forth greater support for HTML5, improved speed and better privacy protection for users.

 

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IE10 is said to be about 20% faster than its predecessor IE9, and utilizes DirectX 11 for the browser's graphics hardware acceleration speed-ups. HTML5 support is improved by more than 60% bringing forth a wealth of new feature rich web elements that developers will be sure to take advantage of.

 

Another feature worth noting is that Do Not Track is enabled by default. This feature blocks certain sites from tracking your browsing habits, such as Google who uses your browsing history to serve up targeted ads. Users must be running Windows 7 with Service Pack 1 installed in order to install Internet Explorer 10. You can download IE10 from the source link below.

Continue reading 'Microsoft finally releases Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, download it now' (full post)

Chrome could soon grow some ears, would listen in on your browser tabs

Google will soon bake in a very cool new feature into Chrome that would allow the browser to listen in on your open tabs, where it would tell you which tabs are making noise, or recording it. The new feature has been baked into the latest Chromium release and features a throbbing EQ animation over any tab that is making noise.

 

 

The reason we're seeing it in Chromium first is that Chromium is where Google plays with features and improvements, such as this, before shifting them over to the stable Chrome build. At the moment, the new feature doesn't work on the OS X-based version of Chromium, but it works within Windows. At first, I didn't think this would be useful - but I'm the kind of person who might open 5-10 (or more) tabs in quick succession, with one of them playing some ad that I can't find - in this case, it would be perfect.

Continue reading 'Chrome could soon grow some ears, would listen in on your browser tabs' (full post)

Google releases Chrome 25, comes with voice recognition support

Google has released the latest stable version of Chrome. This new version comes with the typical bug fixes, improved security, and performance updates that we have come to expect from updates. Also included in this latest version of Chrome is the ability to add voice recognition via the Web Speech API.

 

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The Web Speech API allows Chrome to send snippets or continuous speech to Google's Voice service. Google's servers then send back the text version of what was said. This is incredibly useful for users who can't type do to physical disabilities or are slow typists.

 

Google has also disabled silent extension installs as they announced they were going to do back in December. Google says that too many third-parties were taking advantage of the opportunity to install extensions that users didn't want or didn't even accept.

 

You can download Google Chrome 25 from Google's website.

Google's Chrome web browser to get Chromebook app launcher in future release

Google will be bundling its Chrome OS app launcher with future versions of its Chrome browser, if the latest developer version of Chrome is correct. Yesterday, someone spotted a new feature in a just released developer channel version of Chrome that adds the app launcher feature to the popular browser.

 

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The App Launcher lets you run Chrome apps without launching the browser first. This lets apps that are capable of running offline have a wider range of features than regular web apps. Google has stated that you will have the same experience as Chromebook users via the App Launcher.

 

At the moment, the new feature is only available on the developer's version of Chrome for Windows, but Google has said that the Linux and OSX developer version will be released shortly. No word on which upcoming release of Chrome will see the official launch of the App Launcher, but we will keep you notified when we find out.

Firefox 19 is available for Windows, Mac and Linux ahead of its official launch tomorrow

Firefox 19 isn't going to officially launch until tomorrow, but you can get your hands on the latest version of Mozilla's browser for Windows, Mac and Linux right now.

 

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You can download it directly from Mozilla's FTP server, or you can wait until the official launch and continue to check the Firefox website. Mozilla's blog also provides information about the release if it's significant enough, like Firefox 19. If you are using Firefox as your mobile browser, you might want to also keep an eye on the Google Play Store, too, as it should launch for Android tomorrow.

Opera shrinks in-house Dev team ahead of Webkit adoption

Last week I reported on Opera dumping Presto as it's rendering engine and adoption the more developer friendly, open source Webkit. The news kept flowing when the company managed to pick up Skyfire for a reported $155 million shortly after the Webkit announcement.

 

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It looks like Opera will blanket headlines today as well, as the reports coming in from the Norwegian publication digi.no. They have announced that the company is letting some of its long time devs go from its core technology developer team. The publication said that as many as 90 of the 100 man team were terminated.

 

A large percentage of those who lost their jobs actually took a large severance package before Christmas. Some higher ranking developers were shuffled around to new projects within the company. Opera HR Director Tove Selnes is quoted: "This reorganization has been resolved in cooperation with the individual. We've come to terms with about 90 people, both in development and not development-related departments."

Opera adopts Webkit as it hits 300 million users

Opera, the little web browser that could, has decided to ditch the Presto rendering engine in favor of the more developer friendly and open source Webkit. This announcement comes hot on the heels of reports that put its user base around the 300 million monthly user mark.

 

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Switching to Webkit will be greatly beneficial to the open source project, web developers, and the Chromium project. Hakon Wium Lie, CTO of Opera Software said, it "makes more sense to have our experts working with the open source communities to further improve WebKit and Chromium, rather than developing our own rendering engine further."

 

The switch to Webkit will not be an instant one though as Opera plans on rolling the change out to iOS, Android and PCs over the next year. CEO Lars Boilesen said that he hopes that the change will help the browser "claim a bigger piece of the pie in the smartphone market".

Code update reveals possible new Notification Center for Google Chrome

The latest Windows build of Google's Chrome browser seems to be alluding that big things are on the horizon. Google appears to be readying a new "Notification Center" for its popular browser.

 

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When reading over the latest release's code, Francois Beaufor spotted what appears to be templated notifications which can be enabled by toggling a flag in Chrome's settings. This will allow users to create personalized notifications from within a Chrome extension.

 

Speculation is that the new Notification Center may be the hub for Google Now support in Chrome OS as a recent code revision in Chromium hints at Google Now support. Chrome OS has always supported notifications, but bringing Google Now to the OS could help it become the next big player in the OS market.

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