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ASUS P8Z68-V Pro (Intel Z68) Motherboard Review - Test System Setup and Overclocking

Our first ASUS Z68 board arrives and we don't waste any time. Let's see what the P8Z68-V Pro brings to the table.

| Socket LGA 1155 in Motherboards | Posted: May 23, 2011 3:50 pm
TweakTown Rating: 93%      Manufacturer: ASUS

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We would like to thank the following companies for supplying and supporting us with our test system hardware and equipment: Intel, ASRock, Kingston, Mittoni, Noctua and Corsair.

 

We'll be checking out the ASUS P8Z68-V Pro against a couple of our more expensive boards we've tested which include the MSI Z68A-GD80 and ASRock Extreme4. Apart from these two boards running at both stock and overclocked, we've got the ASRock X58 Extreme3 with our 980X in it.

 

Apart from that, nothing else has changed with our testbeds and instead we'll get into the overclocking side of things. As we mentioned on the previous page, there's the Auto Overclocking ability which is made possible via the "OC Tuner" feature in the BIOS.

 

Choosing to enable that, you'll find your system turn off and then start up and turn off a few times until it finds what is considered a stable overclock. Using that feature, we ended up in Windows at 4429.92MHz, or 4.43GHz as we're saying in our graphs.

 

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You can see this was achieved by bumping the CPU multiplier up to 43x and the BCLK was increased to 103. This is a pretty healthy overclock and stronger than the 4.2GHz we saw the MSI Z68A-GD80 give us using OC Genie II.

 

If that's not enough of an overclock, though, using AI Suite and the Auto Tuning function within Windows you can fine tune your PC even more. Once in Windows we fired up AI Suite, went to Auto Tuning, and because we live life on the edge, hit the Extreme button.

 

Initially the software will start by increasing your multiplier; it will increase it by 1x and then run a test to make sure it's stable. If that passes it will increase the multiplier again and do the same test. Eventually we got to 47x and the system crashed. Our machine rebooted and in Windows the multiplier had dropped back to 46x which it had determined as stable.

 

From there you then have a minute to decide if you want to leave it at that or continue to let AI Suite do its thing. Again, living life on the edge, we let it do its thing and it started to increase our BCLK by .5 at a time.

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Eventually we ended up in Windows at 105.6 x 46 for a massive 4857MHz overclock which equates to a 42% increase in performance. While doing all this, it also increased our Intel HD Graphics 50% to 1650MHz.

 

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While this isn't the "biggest" overclock we've achieved, this is a mammoth overclock when you consider the fact that you don't have to do anything but push a button. We moved from a stock clock of 3.4GHz on our 2600k to 4.85GHz with nothing more than a push of a button and probably a total of 10 minutes of our time.

 

Of course, if all that wasn't enough, it was time for us to jump back into the BIOS to see what we could achieve ourselves by messing around with the multiplier and voltages.

 

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What we ended up at was 5363MHz or 5.36GHz as shown in our graphs. This was just above that of what we achieved on the MSI board, but I have to say there was some more life in this. While the MSI board couldn't really do anything past 5.35GHz, at 5.4GHz we were in Windows with the ASUS board and even doing Hyper PI runs.

 

Unfortunately we couldn't quite finish them with the closest being we got right to the end and then our computer gave a BSOD. For overclocking, though, this is a great board that's able to offer some serious performance, be it in an automatic kind of way or a manual way.

 

Let's get started!

 

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