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Storage Posts - Page 1

SandForce 2.0 - Tidal Systems Takes Shape

We recently discovered a new SSD controller design company is forming and many of the names involved are familiar. The group is headed up by CEO and co-founder Mike Lee. Mr. Lee's former employer was SK Hynix, where he was the Director of SSD SOC Development for the Link A Media Devices team (LAMD).

 

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At this time, details nearly nonexistent other than a few bits of information scattered around the web. The above image started our hunt for more information. Many in the photo are former SandForce, LSI and Skyera employees and all are now with Tidal Systems.

 

We've often wondered what affects SandForce ping pong would have on employees. SandForce was first acquired by LSI, then LSI was acquired by Avago and then SandForce was spun off to Seagate. SandForce founder, CMO and former NVIDIA nForce chipset architect Radoslav Danilak started Skyera to focus on all-flash enterprise storage a few years ago. At least a handful of the pre-LSI SandForce team went with him. Skyera already has two products on the market, skyHawk and skyEagle.

 

We did find a short description about Tidal Systems online:

 

Leveraging our Revolutionary DATA-Compression and Error-Correction (LDPC) Algorithms to create most Powerful System Controller (SoC) and related firmware/software systems solutions to address fast growing NAND Flash Memory based storage products, which is essential for Cloud Computing; Big Data Center; Smartphone, Tablet PC and all Ultra-Portable Computing Appliance.

 

In short, they will make flash controllers. We wish the team good luck and hope to be the first to test the new products when ready.

We could see 15TB HDDs next year thanks to HAMR technology

TDK was teasing its new heads for HDDs that support heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology last week, at the Ceatec trade show in Japan. These new heads could see the introduction of massive next-generation HDDs, that could see up to 15TB of storage on a single drive.

 

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At the moment, current HDDs are held back by the physical size of "pitches" on the HDDs media that are required to store a single bit of information. HAMR on the other hand, records data on high-stability media, or iron platinum alloy, using laser thermal assistance to first heat up the material, which then paves the way to reduce the sizes of the required "pitches" without negative effects on readability, writability, and stability.

 

This means that HAMR-powered HDDs will be capable of storing massive amounts of data, multitudes more than even the biggest HDDs we can buy today. Futurezone spoke with TDK, with a TDK rep saying that the first commercial HAMR-powered drives could arrive by late 2015, or early 2016. We should expect the first HAMR drives to provide us with around 15TB of HDD space, which will truly be crazy. The first wave of HAMR drives will be setting their sights on near-line storage applications that require HDDs with maximum capacity, with consumer drives to eventually receive the HAMR tech, and massive 15TB+ capacities.

Continue reading 'We could see 15TB HDDs next year thanks to HAMR technology' (full post)

Samsung Begins Production of 3-bit V-NAND Flash Memory - 850 EVO Soon

Today Samsung announced mass production of 3-bit per cell 3D vertical NAND (TLC V-NAND). This shouldn't come as a surprise since Samsung first started talking about the new TLC version just days after releasing the 850 Pro SSD with MLC V-NAND. Even though the surprise is lost, that doesn't mean this isn't a technical achievement that can profoundly impact the consumer and enterprise cold storage SSD markets.

 

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The press release doesn't mention by name the long rumored 850 EVO SSD but does say that something, maybe even a couple of somethings are coming.

 

"With the addition of a whole new line of high density SSDs that is both performance- and value-driven, we believe the 3-bit V-NAND will accelerate the transition of data storage devices from hard disk drives to SSDs," said Jaesoo Han, Senior Vice President, Memory Sales & Marketing, Samsung Electronics. "The wider variety of SSDs will increase our product competitiveness as we further expand our rapidly growing SSD business."

Continue reading 'Samsung Begins Production of 3-bit V-NAND Flash Memory - 850 EVO Soon' (full post)

Self-destructing SSDs can be remotely destroyed from an SMS

In something that feels like it's right out of Hollywood, we now have self-destructing SSDs. SecureDrives has the technology, with four different SSDs on offer that provide 256-bit AES CBC hardware encryption, two-factor authentication, GSM command over encryption key flipping and physical fracturing of the NAND flash itself.

 

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This kind of technology might not seem like something you or I might use, but for those with super-sensitive information on their notebooks that might get left behind, or stolen, this is perfect. The SecureDrive SSDs have a self-destruct mechanism which happens if someone attempts to physically open the drive, which will initiate the physical fracturing of the NAND flash.

 

Better yet, you can configure the SSD to self-destruct if it's removed from your SATA II connector. Other options include self-destruction if the internal battery runs completely empty, and the convenient ability to destroy the drive if an an SMS is sent from any phone.

2016 is 'year of the zettabyte', with 1ZB equal to ~1.1 trillion GB

Seagate's Twitter account just blasted something both truly exciting, and incredibly terrifying: the first real tease of the zettabyte. Seagate posted XO Communications' infographic on the Zettabyte, or ZB.

 

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To put things into perspective, 1ZB is around 1.1 trillion GB - yes, 1.1 trillion gigabytes. The infographic, above, says that according to Cisco's Visual Networking Index, the "world will cross the Zettabyte threshold of data transferred annually via the Internet by the end of 2016". To put things into an even scarier perspective, 1PB (Petabyte) is 1024TB (Terabyte), and 1EX (Exabyte) is 1024PB, so 1ZB is an insane 1024EB, which is just scary.

 

What is driving this Zettabyte amount of data? Internet video, with around 55% of Internet video expected to chew up 99% of all Internet traffic in 2016. The remaining 44% is split between web/data with 23%, and file sharing with 21%.

Samsung teases 3.2TB PCIe-based SSD, capable of 3GB/sec reads

The largest Samsung SSD available is sitting at a huge 1.6TB, but not anymore - the company has just unveiled its enterprise-class SM1715, which cranks this up to a gigantic 3.2TB.

 

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Samsung's new SM1715 SSD is a PCIe-based device, using a PCI Express 3.0 port, based on NVMe technology. The new drive also features Samsung's new 3D V-NAND technology, where storage chips are placed on top of one another, and not next to each other, with the storage chips connected through a very thin, high-speed connector called TSV, or Thru Silicon Via.

 

This new technology paves the way for increased read/writes, with sequential read speeds on the new SM1715 at a huge 3000MB/sec, or 3GB/sec and writes sitting at an equally-impressive 2200MB/sec, or 2.2GB/sec. Random read speeds on the drive are at 750,000 IOPS, while writes are at 130,000 IOPS. Samsung will also make the SM1715 available in 1.6TB, as well as the 3.2TB behemoth.

Cypress intros the new SuperSpeed Explorer Kit at IDF 2014

IDF 2014 - At Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2014, Cypress Semiconductor Corp. introduced a low-cost, easy-to-use development platform that enables designers to add high-performance USB 3.0 throughput to virtually any system.

 

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The EZ-USB FX3 is the industry's only programmable USB 3.0 peripheral controller. It is equipped with a highly configurable General Programmable Interface (GPIF II), which can be programmed in 8-, 16-, and 32-bit configurations. GPIF II allows FX3 to communicate directly with application processors, FPGAs, storage media, and image sensors and provides a data transfer rate of up to 400 Megabytes per second, while using lower power than alternative solutions. The SuperSpeed Explorer Kit easily interfaces with external devices via three accessory boards that connect to Aptina image sensors, Altera FPGAs and Xilinx FPGAs, respectively. The kit also includes an integrated debugger with a standard USB interface to further simplify designs and speed time to market.

Continue reading 'Cypress intros the new SuperSpeed Explorer Kit at IDF 2014' (full post)

Micron Announces M600 2.5 SATA, mSATA and m.2 SSDs for OEMs

Today Micron announced the new M600 SSD with Micron's innovative 128Gb 16nm MLC NAND flash. Availability comes in three form factors, 2.5" SATA, mSATA and m.2 (NGFF).

 

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The M600 product series was designed for system builders and OEMs for use in off-the-shelf or custom PCs like corporate notebooks, Ultrabooks, tablets, video production, workstation and even embedded systems that require predictable high performance, low power consumptions, data security and high reliability.

 

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Micron claims sequential read performance at 560 MB/s and sequential write performance at 510 MB/s. Random performance is rated at 100K read and 88K write. The 4-corner numbers are impressive but just as impressive are the endurance ratings. Micron claims the 128GB models deliver a staggering 100TB enduarance. The 256GB takes that up to 200 TB, the 512GB model up to 300 TB and the large 1TB model can deliver 400 TB of write endurance.

Continue reading 'Micron Announces M600 2.5 SATA, mSATA and m.2 SSDs for OEMs' (full post)

SanDisk launches SD memory card with 512GB storage capacity

Flash memory company SanDisk recently introduced its Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-I storage card, a storage device that can hold up to 512GB of data, and now is the highest-capacity SD card currently available. The card is designed for professional photographers and videographers working in 4K ultra-high definition work.

 

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The card supports write speeds up to 90 MB/s, along with transfer speeds up to 95 MB/s for faster post-production transfers. The card is about the size of a postage stamp and will be available for around $800.

 

4K Ultra HD is an example of a technology that is pushing us to develop new storage solutions capable of handling massive file sizes," said Dinesh Bahal, SanDisk VP of product marketing, in a statent. The 512GB SanDisk Extreme PRO SDXC UHS-I card is a tremendous advancement that enables professionals to reliably store more content on a single card than ever before."

HGST reveals its 10TB HDD using Shingled Magnetic Recording technology

IFA 2014 is currently underway in San Francisco, with HGST showing off its newest member in its HelioSeal family, the new Enterprise-class SMR-based 10TB HDD. Yes, you read that right - ten terabytes of storage in a single drive.

 

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HGST achieved this insane level of storage by using its Helium-filled HelioSeal technology mixed with Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR), but it comes at a price. SMR writes to the disk in a way where its mainly a sequential write/random access read storage device. The tracks inside of the 10TB HDD are slightly overlapped as they're being written to the disk.

 

Thanks to this method, we have a massively increased density up to 10TB, but writing to the middle of the disk isn't possible without overwriting two shingled tracks simultaneously. PC Perspective explains this as "CD-RW writing, but for hard disks". These new drives will be a better buy than tape-based archiving methods, especially with storage now hitting 10TB per drive.

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