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XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review (Page 3)

Shannon Robb | Jan 20, 2020 at 10:46 am CST - 2 mins, 45 secs reading time for this page
Rating: 91%Manufacturer: XPGModel: INVADER-BKCWW

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 06 | TweakTown.com

The front of the Invader is a metal panel black in color with an XPG logo embellishment in red. We can see the glass panel protruding slightly to the left and the plastic feet down below.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 07 | TweakTown.com

On the top of the Invader, we have a magnetic filter in place covering the top 2x120mm mounting. Up front we have the I/O, which we will look at next.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 08 | TweakTown.com

The I/O, as we observed previously, is along the front most edge of the metal chassis. The I/O is outfitted with the following:

  • 2x USB 3.0 (USB 3.2 Gen 1) Type-A ports
  • Microphone and Headphone combo port
  • LED controller mode button
  • Reset button with integrated HDD LED
  • Triangular power button with integrated power LED

The triangular button I instantly thought of a "play button," and sure enough, when looking at the XPG material for the Invader chassis, we see them reference it the same way. The power LED in the power switch is white in color while the tiny LED for HDD activity shines through red on the reset button. The RGB control button has over ten modes, including some ARGB color flow modes for the bottom-firing front LED along with static color modes for the additional 4-pin RGB connectors.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 09 | TweakTown.com

The central panel of the Invader is a tempered glass panel. I do like that XPG opted for a model with rear screws as the on panel fasteners can take away from the clean aesthetic of the glass panel. We can see the accessory box inside along with the XPG logo on the PSU shroud peeking out from behind the glass panel. We can now see the gap on the front panel, which feeds air to the front cooling mounting.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 10 | TweakTown.com

Here at the rear of the Invader, we find that the chassis is outfitted with everything you would expect. The rear fan mount has about 4-6mm of vertical adjustment with its very mildly slotted mounting. The seven expansion slots are accessed externally and have two screws holding on the access cover. The PSU mounts to the chassis with an external bracket that comes in the accessory kit. Here we see the plastic handled panel attachment screws used on both the main glass and cable management steel panel.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 11 | TweakTown.com

Here we have the cable management side of the Invader and the solid steel panel in place covering up this area. There is triangular ventilation here up front, which matches the vertical cooling mounting to allow ingestion or exhaust through this area. The ventilation here is filtered with an internally mounted magnetic filter. The front panel, we see once again that there is the same gap here for airflow ingress into the chassis.

XPG Invader Mid-Tower Chassis Review 12 | TweakTown.com

The bottom of the Invader has two small filters covering both the PSU inlet along with the bottom fan mounting. The feet are also visible here, one per corner. The feet are plastic with rubber bottom pads to avoid skidding. The bottom of the front panel can also be observed here with an opaque white plastic in place. This plastic is designed to help diffuse the bottom-firing ARGB LEDs.

Last updated: Jan 21, 2020 at 06:11 am CST

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Shannon Robb

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Shannon Robb

Shannon started his PC journey around the age of six in 1989. Now till present day, he has established himself in the overclocking world, spending many years pushing the limits of hardware on LN2. Shannon has worked with design and R&D on various components, including PC systems and chassis, to optimize the layout and performance for enthusiasts.

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