Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review (Page 7)

| Nov 30, 2019 at 11:35 am CST
Rating: 90%Manufacturer: CorsairModel: CC-9011170-WW

Case Build & Finished Product

VIEW GALLERY - 39 IMAGES

The front of the chassis remains the same post build as the front panel is opaque, so you cannot see the changes or addition of components.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 31 | TweakTown.com

As we see here, the motherboard went in smoothly and had room to spare to the right-hand edge since this is not an EATX board. The GPU also slotted in, and the access holes in the chassis made quick work of installing the GPU without needing to try to thread screws in at an angle with my driver as some chassis require you do. You will notice that the cables by and large are absent as the multitude of cable management holes means most things can be tucked out of sight quickly.

The addition of the extra height of the chassis above the motherboard means there is no threat of fitment issues with the RAM since space is large enough to swallow up the radiator and fans with room to spare. The 678C is shaping up to be a potentially viable candidate for a full custom liquid cooling loop. Do note that we did relocate the top-mounted fan to the front so that the AIO could be placed without issue.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 32 | TweakTown.com

The rear I/O is filled as expected, while we could have moved the rear fan in its slotted hole, the default position was already excellent for the application. We did not have a Corsair riser, so the vertical GPU mount will remain untested.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 33 | TweakTown.com

Here we have the cable management for the 678C with our build installed. As you can see, we opted to run almost all of the cables to the front area where there was more space to work with for cabling runs. The exception being the EPS 8-pin lead, which was routed alongside the rear frame rail, but the SSD caddy was removed to accommodate the wire run, then reinstalled.

Corsair put an immense amount of cable tie points in the 678C, and many of them came to good use. For those who get anxiety, just thinking about cable management need only remember that the rear panel is opaque, so you will never see your cables once the build is complete.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 34 | TweakTown.com

One area I wanted to show before we button this rig up is the inclusion of the sound deadening to the rear panel. This helps keep noise inside the chassis along with making the rear panel feel far heavier than you would expect. Also, this panel shows another exciting thing as you will notice the sound deadening is removed for a large rectangle, which coincides with the SSD tray on the rear. This should show you just how close the tray is to the panel that they had to shave away the sound isolation material on the panel to clear it.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 35 | TweakTown.com

With all of the parts installed but not powered, the system looks subdued, but due to the light smoke of the glass, the components are still readily visible. The white chassis interior keeps the panel looking brighter than it is as white reflects far more light, and therefore you get more visibility form the panel.

Corsair Carbide 678C Mid-Tower Chassis Review 36 | TweakTown.com

Kicking the system to life, and we see that the rainbow unicorn test build is alive and well. I will say that the 140mm preinstalled fans in the 678C are rather quiet as I could not hear them over any other noise from the system.

Last updated: Dec 1, 2019 at 06:11 am CST

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR -

Shannon started his PC journey around the age of six in 1989. Now till present day, he has established himself in the overclocking world, spending many years pushing the limits of hardware on LN2. Shannon has worked with design and R&D on various components, including PC systems and chassis, to optimize the layout and performance for enthusiasts.

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