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Corsair Carbide Series SPEC-OMEGA Mid-Tower Chassis Review

By: Chad Sebring | Mid-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Oct 15, 2018 3:00 pm
TweakTown Rating: 95%Manufacturer: Corsair

Final Thoughts

 

The list of things that Corsair did right is quite full. The front of the chassis seems blocked off, but Darth Vader's mouth at the bottom does reasonably well at introducing a source of colder air to the intake fans. We did replace the stock fan in the front of the chassis, but none the less, the thermals inside of the chassis are still in the average range. The styling is hit or miss with people, but we love it, and applaud companies that move away from the standard cubist designs.

 

corsair-carbide-series-spec-omega-mid-tower-chassis-review_31

 

The interior offers grommets, room for plenty of storage drives for most users, plenty of places to tend to the wires, it has a few grommets where they are needed most, and the chassis is built well so that your components look very appealing inside of it. We even like the exaggerated feet that support the chassis. Not only do they extend past the frame of the chassis for added stability, but they also continue the angular design theme throughout the entire chassis.

 

There are limited downsides to such a chassis, but it would not be right to gloss over them. The most significant feature we wish was incorporated was a PSU cover. Sorry, but we are so used to them, their ability to close off the PSU and wire mess, that we feel that all cases should have them. While the front of the chassis will accommodate many peoples liquid cooling needs, we do wish the top of the chassis was also capable of housing a radiator.

 

 

For those with an AIO on the GPU as well as the CPU, the back of the chassis is the only option for a secondary system to be hung from. There are the listed three locations for 3.5" drives, where we only found two, and the fact that the HDD cage will need to be removed for most power supplied to fit unless you make the conscious decision to buy a smaller unit.

 

While we do like the chassis for what it is, we have to knock a few points off for the lack of a PSU cover. Most cases offered now, in this price range include them, and is the only thing aside for wanting more intake ventilation that we feel could have been changed to make an outstanding mid-tower chassis that we could rant and rave about. At around $99.99, depending on the choice of retailers, we feel that you do get quite a bit of bang for the buck, especially in styling and overall presence. Keep in mind too, there is an RGB version of this chassis out in the wild, although there is a price hike to obtain it. Overall, we feel that many can overlook the lack of a few minor details, and will happily house they system inside of the Carbide Series Spec-Omega Mid-tower Chassis. If we had a reason to build another system, we would have no qualms with using this chassis.

 

 

Chad's Chassis Test System Specifications

 

Product Summary Breakdown

TweakTown award
Performance95%
Quality100%
Features90%
Value93%
Overall TweakTown Rating95%

The Bottom Line: With a larger intake and a PSU cover, the Spec-Omega chassis could have gotten a perfect score. There is plenty to interest the masses, room for all of the components, style for days, and a price most anyone can accept. This is a mid-tower chassis worthy of a long hard look!

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