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HyperX Alloy Elite RGB Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review

By: Chad Sebring | Keyboards in Peripherals | Posted: Apr 17, 2018 3:00 pm
TweakTown Rating: 93%Manufacturer: HyperX

HyperX Alloy Elite RGB Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

 

 

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The view from the left of the Alloy Elite RGB is identical to that of the Alloy Elite, where there appears to be two separate sections, both of which are stylized with angles and irregular shapes. The switches are exposed above the steel plate, and we see that while lying flat, the keycaps are not angled for ergonomic usage.

 

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The main section of seventy-four keys is presented in a US QWERTY layout, where none of the keys are marked for double duty. While many of the keys do look ordinary, HyperX has used the name on the space bar rather than opting for a thin line along it.

 

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At the top-left corner, three additional buttons are presented. The first of which adjusts the brightness in three stages, and will also turn off the lights if needed. The second button will cycle through the three default modes of LED light presentation. The third key is the game lockout button. By default, it locks out the Windows flight keys, but via software, can also lock out a few more.

 

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On the right side of the keyboard, we find the remaining thirty keys layout. Again, there is no marked dual functionality for the keys, but we do see an extra set of arrows marked on the number pad.

 

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The top-right corner is where the multimedia keys and wheel are on the Alloy Elite RGB. Four buttons allow users to go back a track, play or pause a track, go forward a track, and mute all sound. To adjust the volume, you use the scroll style wheel. We also see the HyperX name which is painted on the steel plate, along with the three lock LEDs to the right for game lockout, the number lock, as well as the caps lock.

 

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The right side of the Alloy Elite RGB is a mirror image of what the left side looks like, only this time we have extended the feet under the keyboard. Doping so has delivered a much more ergonomic angle to the keycaps on top of the keyboard, and in conjunction with the use of the wrist rest, should provide hours of pain-free use.

 

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Moving around to the back of the keyboard, we located the USB 2.0 pass-through port. This is handy for mice and headphones to help with wire management on the desk. It is also beneficial for those not wanting to reach for the PC when the need to use USB storage use arises.

 

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The cable comes out of the box bundled with a wire tie and is sleeved from stem to stern. As the cable leaves the keyboard, it is thick, until it runs into the splitter cover. Once that point is reached, we are given two smaller cables, and the one with the red tag on it is for the keyboard, while the unmarked one is used to power the pass-through port.

 

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HyperX also ensures the bottom of the keyboard looks as good as the rest of it by using indented sections which follow the shapes seen on the sides of it. This is done more for stability and structural integrity than for style points, but we like what we see anyways. There are four rubber feet which keep the Alloy Elite RGB from moving around, and at the front edge is where the wrist rest clips into the keyboard.

 

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For those looking to add some height to the back of the Alloy Elite RGB, you will need to flip out the back feet. They do flip towards the back of the keyboard but go far enough as not to collapse from keyboard movement easily. We can also see that the bottom of the legs also offers a rubber pad, so you do not give up on stability by using them.

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