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Raidmax Sigma ATX Tower Chassis Review

By: Chad Sebring | Full-Tower Cases in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jun 14, 2017 1:14 pm
TweakTown Rating: 95%Manufacturer: Raidmax

Inside the Sigma




We do like that the wires from the front I/O panel are attached to the chassis, but there is still a lead for the LED in the bottom of the bezel which stays glued to it. The front of the chassis has a large dust filter which runs from top to bottom, and is magnetically attached to the right, and hinged on the left.





The inside of the Sigma offers two cooling zones due to the PSU cover at the bottom. There is a gap left at the front to support thin radiators with water cooling, and the brass threads for the tempered glass have grommets applied so that it can support the glass when the screws are removed.




Inside the front of the chassis, we see nothing but room for fans. You could install three 120mm fans or a pair of 140mm fans. The motherboard tray to the left of it is slightly inset, has room for wires to pass through, and even has remnants of where the ODD bays used to be in a previous design.




The top of the Sigma, once the stylish cover has been removed, has a raised section for mounting extra cooling. Being raised allows for fans to be above the chassis, and it also allows for the use of thin radiators, as fans are still able to clean the motherboard.




The motherboard tray ships with all of the standoffs in the tray for an ATX motherboard. Two holes at the top and a slot to the right of the motherboard ease wire management, and the SPU cooler access hole is wide enough it becomes a wire pass-through with Mini-ITX boards. When it comes to securing wires to the tray, there are twelve locations conveniently placed to use.




The PSU cover is solid on the side of it, where there is an LED backlit Raidmax plaque screwed into the cover. The top of it delivers a hole for the front I/O wiring, another for PCI-e power cables, and is louvered at the front to scoop some of the air from below and push it toward the video card intake fans.




The back of the chassis houses the only fan sent in the case, and it is the clear 140mm blue LED fan seen hanging there. It is powered via a 3-pin connector at the end of the lead, or you can power it via Molex 4-pin, which is also connected in the lead.




Behind the motherboard tray we are given 20mm of room across most of the top section, but even more room where the SSD trays and the front panel wiring is currently. Looking under the PSU cover, we see the hardware in the HDD cage, and the manual is laid in where the PSU will be soon.




The HDD cage has two trays screwed into it, and both trays can house either a 3.5" or 2.5" drive. The support structure on the right side of the cage is removable, which gives more room for longer power supplies, or it can be used as a large area to route excess wires into.




The power supply rests on plastic legs with rubber feet on top of them, and under the PSU the chassis is well vented for the intake fan. We can also see the backing for the Raidmax LED plaque, and the lead which needs to be powered.




The 4-pin Molex on the left is from the front bezel so the chassis can make the desk glow, and to the right we see the black wires from the LDD LED, power button, and reset button. Next in line is the native USB 3.0 connector, we see the HD Audio connection just below it, and to the right is the Molex power plug from the Raidmax plaque on the PSU cover.

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