Technology and gaming content trusted in North America and globally since 1999
8,617 Reviews & Articles | 61,057 News Posts

Swiftech Polaris 120 High Performance CPU Cooler Review (Page 2)

Chad Sebring | Mar 27, 2011 at 9:16 pm CDT - 3 mins, 1 sec time to read this page
Rating: 90%Manufacturer: Swiftech

Specifications, Availability and Pricing

VIEW GALLERY - 28 IMAGES

As with most tower coolers, the Polaris 120 consists of aluminum fins; forty-six to be exact, pressed over a set of five heat pipes. In the Polaris 120 these five heat pipes are sintered, which has to do with the type of wicking properties the inside of the heat pipe contains. In the case of the sintered pipe, it is usually good for anti gravity situations, and allows for tighter bends within the length of the pipe. At the base the pipes are squeezed together and are square in appearance as all five pipes are going to make direct-touch contact with the processor. Holding the pipes together at the base is an aluminum block that not only keeps the pipes in place, it gets used to mount the universal mounting ring to the cooler.

Between the massive heat pipes, the amount of aluminum in the fins, and the added weight of the included fan, this cooler weighs in at almost 2 pounds. While it seems a bit heavy, I assure you the mounting system is very secure and should cause no issues with warping a motherboard. Along with this weight you do get not only an attractive to look at product, you get many features built in that you may not notice at first glance. Things like fully enclosed sides to trap airflow, dimples in the fins to disturb the air as it passes over them for better heat transfer, a serrated leading edge of all of the front edges to get the turbulence correct before the air passes over the fins, along with the secret I left off the first page.

Working in conjunction with the closed sides of the Polaris 120, Swiftech implemented an "airfoil" shaped center airflow director. I know that sounds a bit abstract, so think of it this way. Take a wing off a model airplane and insert it dead center into a body of fins. With this design the hole is punched in the fins and the edges get rolled to direct the airflow right over the heat pipes. This takes the majority of the "dead zone" in cooling and directs the top and bottom of the dead zone over the pipes along with what already comes from either side of the fans hub. If the idea still isn't clear after the review is over, you can look at the drawings from Swiftech here. To work with this wind tunnel design Swiftech didn't choose a slouch, they went right to the 84CFM range which comes on most coolers today. This fan boasts good control on the range of speeds and noise levels, but with a 41 dBA rating on the box; that means it's going to make some noise while it's working.

When I caught wind of this cooler, it was just over a week ago as I write this, and they wanted to be sure that we got one with all the others that went around to be reviewed. With that being said, there are obviously retail samples out there as I got a complete kit from Swiftech. As I check the new Swiftech.com website, I see they have them listed and are available to "add to cart" for $59.95 direct from Swiftech . I don't have any word on if they are going to let others carry this line of coolers yet, but if you want one now it seems you need to buy one direct. The $60 price point is very good, and as you will soon see, as did I when I ran the testing, this is a serious cooler for a minimal price.

Last updated: Apr 7, 2020 at 12:30 pm CDT

PRICING: You can find products similar to this one for sale below.

USUnited States: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.com

UKUnited Kingdom: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.co.uk

AUAustralia: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.com.au

CACanada: Find other tech and computer products like this over at Amazon.ca

DEDeutschland: Finde andere Technik- und Computerprodukte wie dieses auf Amazon.de

Chad Sebring

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Chad Sebring

After a year of gaming, Chad caught the OC bug. With overclocking comes the need for better cooling, and Chad has had many air and water setups. With a few years of abusing computer parts, he decided to take his chances and try to get a review job. As an avid overclocker, Chad is always looking for the next leg up in RAM, cooling, as well as peripherals.

We openly invite the companies who provide us with review samples / who are mentioned or discussed to express their opinion. If any company representative wishes to respond, we will publish the response here. Please contact us if you wish to respond.

Related Tags