Electric Vehicles & Cars News - Page 75

All the latest electric cars (EV) and ICE cars news covering new and upcoming releases and technologies to hit the market - Page 75.

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Buying a new car? Enjoy Apple CarPlay or Google Android Auto

Michael Hatamoto | May 29, 2015 7:20 AM CDT

Google Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are pushing in-vehicle connectivity, with almost every vehicle automaker expected to offer the software platforms by the end of the year.

Seven different 2016 Chevrolet models will offer CarPlay or Android Auto, while Hyundai said it will support Android in its Sonata. Supporting connected technology is an estimated effort to help drivers and passengers more easily interact with their smartphones while in the vehicle - and provide automakers with a more universal platform to install.

"We just want familiar. We want our content, our services that we already own on our phone," said Tim Bajarin, president of the Creative Strategies tech research firm, in a statement published by the AP. "We just want the car to have the representation of that on demand."

Continue reading: Buying a new car? Enjoy Apple CarPlay or Google Android Auto (full post)

Autonomous vehicle evolution could lead to even longer commute travel

Michael Hatamoto | May 19, 2015 10:25 PM CDT

Autonomous vehicles will seemingly take over the open road one day, but no one is really sure when that will begin. However, passengers will no longer have to worry about fighting gridlock traffic, it's possible commute distances to and from work will increase.

The free time will allow passengers to get work done, play on social media, or just relax while they commute - and it's possible travel distances could reach around 180 miles each way, according to recent predictions. For example, someone with an autonomous vehicle could leave their home in Vermont at 7:30 AM and arrive at a midtown Manhattan office at 9:00 AM, depending on the road infrastructure for autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous vehicles could change all of that in the coming years: Current standards indicate most people live about 30 minutes away from where they work, regardless of how they travel to and from the office.

Continue reading: Autonomous vehicle evolution could lead to even longer commute travel (full post)

Google says its self-driving cars have been involved in 11 accidents

Michael Hatamoto | May 11, 2015 6:26 PM CDT

Google self-driving vehicles have had 11 minor traffic accidents during six years of testing, but the vehicle and human passenger were not at fault. Following reports that the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) has received accident reports from three Google-equipped Lexus SUVs since September 2014.

Most reported accidents were caused by another vehicle rear-ending the Google autonomous test car, according to Google.

"Not only are we developing a good understanding of minor accident rates on suburban streets, we've also identified patterns of driver behavior (lane drifting, red-light running) that are leading indicators of significant collisions," said Chris Urmson, director of the self-driving car program at Google, in a blog post. "Those behaviors don't ever show up in official statistics, but they create dangerous situations for everyone around them."

Continue reading: Google says its self-driving cars have been involved in 11 accidents (full post)

Tesla wants hackers to try and hack their electric vehicles

Anthony Garreffa | Apr 30, 2015 8:38 AM CDT

Just a week after Tesla Motors' Twitter page was hacked, the electric vehicle maker wants to have hackers attempt to hack their cars, something the company will be asking hackers to do at the Defcon convention later this year in Las Vegas, according to anonymous sources of Forbes.

Having hackers try to break into a Tesla vehicle has benefits for the company, as it will make Tesla aware of any security holes in their vehicles and software, and they'll have their picking of hiring anyone who is capable of hacking into their vehicles, and having them instead plug the security holes they discovered.

With a concentrated effort on making vehicles and the world around them smarter and smarter, electric and autonomous vehicle makers are going to need increasingly stronger and near invincible security on their cars. This means we're going to see a huge focus on digital security on cars at both Defcon and BlackHat 2015, both taking place in Vegas later this year.

Continue reading: Tesla wants hackers to try and hack their electric vehicles (full post)

Analysts believe Apple has logical reasons to join vehicle market

Michael Hatamoto | Apr 16, 2015 7:30 AM CDT

Apple's decision to reportedly work on a vehicle makes sense, as the Silicon Valley company looks to jump into a market that has more than $1 trillion in yearly sales, according to Sanford C. Bernstein analysts.

In their "5 Reasons Why We Believe Apple May Indeed Be Looking to Build a Car," analysts Toni Sacconaghi and Max Warburton also noted that Apple isn't afraid to enter an established market - and can rely on its established business ties in China to help foster possible car manufacturing capabilities.

In addition, Apple has a large amount of financial resources it can invest, and even with a high luxury price tag, the auto industry is expected to see luxury models increase sales in upcoming years.

Continue reading: Analysts believe Apple has logical reasons to join vehicle market (full post)

Software is absolutely critical in race to develop autonomous vehicles

Michael Hatamoto | Apr 2, 2015 11:30 AM CDT

As more automakers begin to test autonomous vehicles, there is a strong demand for software that helps self-driving vehicles make decisions. It's a complicated issue to deal with, as test vehicles sometimes need more than 10 times the amount of software used in commercial aircraft and military fighter jets.

"Cars need much more software than aircraft. The environment in the air is easier, there are no obstacles and they are driven by professional pilots," said Eric Feron, professor of aerospace engineering at Georgia Tech, in a statement published by Reuters. "It is much more complicated on the ground."

German automakers are struggling because current laws restrict vehicle testing on public roads, which is important for data collection. There is concern that Google and US companies will be able to have an advantage in autonomous vehicle software development.

Continue reading: Software is absolutely critical in race to develop autonomous vehicles (full post)

Delphi's autonomous car successfully finishes cross-country trip

Michael Hatamoto | Apr 2, 2015 8:30 AM CDT

The Delphi Automotive autonomous vehicle successfully completed a trip from San Francisco to New York, marking the longest autonomous vehicle campaign. The vehicle used was a customized Audi SQ5 SUV, and was first unveiled during the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January.

The vehicle uses six long-range radars, three vision-based cameras, four short-range radars, six lidars, and customized software algorithms working to help the vehicle navigate itself. Engineers hope to use data collected during the 3,500-mile journey to help refine its efforts, while setting future goals for autonomous technology.

"The car actually handled extremely well," said Wayne Cunningham, car tech editor of CNET, after getting the chance to drive the vehicle. "When it saw other cars around, it slowed down. It was following the lane lines too."

Continue reading: Delphi's autonomous car successfully finishes cross-country trip (full post)

Ford fighting to find ways to support wearables, Internet of Things

Michael Hatamoto | Apr 2, 2015 5:34 AM CDT

Automakers must find ways to cater to increasingly connected drivers and passengers, with Ford saying it is trying to accommodate fitness bands, smartwatches, and other wearables in new vehicles. As more Things connect to the Internet of Things (IoT), connectivity will be expected in newer vehicles that interest auto buyers.

"Now the car is becoming the ultimate technology product, and we are becoming more of an information company," said Mark Fields, CEO of Ford, in a statement to CIO Journal. It's true that vehicles are becoming rolling Internet and tech machines - needing to cater to increasingly connected drivers and passengers.

All collected data will be encrypted and shared when owners authorize it - so Ford Sync can inform drivers if blood glucose levels are dropping, or to share data with physicians. It seems like rather obscure data for a vehicle to monitor, but Ford wants to make health and wellness even more accessible to drivers.

Continue reading: Ford fighting to find ways to support wearables, Internet of Things (full post)

Ford intelligent speed system reads signs, adjusts driving speed

Michael Hatamoto | Mar 25, 2015 1:33 PM CDT

The newest version of the Ford S-Max vehicle has an intelligent speed limiter that is able to read traffic signs and adjust the throttle. Using a custom traffic sign recognition system, the brake pedal doesn't need to be used to slow down the vehicle - with electronic signals sent to control engine torque.

The Ford S-Max will be available this August, and should be implemented in Ford vehicles worldwide. Drivers can adjust the system so they are able to drive up to 5 mph over the speed limit.

"There's a plan for speed restrictions to be beamed to your car's computer systems and controlled from there, rather than requiring street sign visual recognition systems," said Paul Newton, automotive industry analyst at IHS, in a statement published by BBC. "This would be part of an extension of the networks that will connect vehicles, allowing cars to warn those behind them if they are slowing down, which is all part of a move toward autonomous vehicles that drive themselves."

Continue reading: Ford intelligent speed system reads signs, adjusts driving speed (full post)

Delphi's driverless car will start nationwide journey later today

Michael Hatamoto | Mar 22, 2015 2:08 AM CDT

Delphi plans to show off the true potential of autonomous vehicle technology when its driverless car begins a cross-country trip later today, leaving California and heading to New York. A driver will be present to take over in case of an emergency.

The 3,500-mile journey will be used so engineers are able to collect valuable live data that can further enhance the self-driving car technology. The vehicle is able to accurately navigate a 4-way stop, safely pass cyclists, and merge and exit highways on its own.

"Delphi had great success testing its car in California and on the streets of Las Vegas," said Jeff Owens, chief technology officer of Delphi. "now it's time to put our vehicle to the ultimate test by broadening the range of driving conditions. This drive will help us collect invaluable data in our quest to deliver the best automotive grade technologies on the market."

Continue reading: Delphi's driverless car will start nationwide journey later today (full post)