Electric Vehicles & Cars News - Page 74

All the latest electric cars (EV) and ICE cars news covering new and upcoming releases and technologies to hit the market - Page 74.

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Domino's unveils a new pizza delivery car, with a built-in oven

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 21, 2015 9:28 PM CDT

Domino's has just unveiled an impressive new pizza delivery car, where it has heavily modified a Chevy Spark into the pizza delivery car to end the war between pizza delivery cars - it has a damn built-in oven!

The new '100 DXP' is being rolled out across 25 cities around the United States in the next 90 days, including Boston, Dallas, New Orleans, San Diego and Seattle. The vehicle has an outward-facing oven in the back, so that your pizza delivery driver can arrive to your house with pizza that has literally just come out of the oven.

Better yet, the modified Chevy Spark can hold 80 pizzas for those late night gaming sessions - you know, when you need 80 pizzas. The car makes sense, and once these bad boys have 3D printers in the back and get injected with some self-driving technology, we could see pizza delivery step into the future.

Continue reading: Domino's unveils a new pizza delivery car, with a built-in oven (full post)

Stanford unveils self-driving electric DeLorean named Marty

Derek Strickland | Oct 21, 2015 9:20 AM CDT

With its new autonomous, electric DeLorean, Stanford University has all the other Back To the Future Day creations beat.

Stanford unveils self-driving electric DeLorean named Marty

Named after the film's iconic hoverboard-riding don't-call-me-chicken Marty McFly, Stanford's self-driving DeLorean was built in conjunction with the Revs Program at Stanford and Renovo Motors, and stands as the team's newest research project.

"We want to design automated vehicles that can take any action necessary to avoid an accident," said Chris Gerdes, a Stanford professor of mechanical engineering who orchestrated the project. "The laws of physics will limit what the car can do, but we think the software should be capable of any possible maneuver within those limits. MARTY is another step in this direction, thanks to the passion and hard work of our students. Stanford builds great research by building great researchers."

Continue reading: Stanford unveils self-driving electric DeLorean named Marty (full post)

Tesla's new $140K Model X is virus-proof, gets 250 miles per charge

Derek Strickland | Sep 30, 2015 7:30 AM CDT

Tesla Motors announce its new Model X electric SUV to much fanfare and applause last night, revealing a huge array of features and specifications that not only wowed consumers and tech geeks, but also medical professionals and doomsday preppers.

Elon Musk touted that the Model X has a bio-defense mode that delivers "hospital level air quality" to protect up to seven passengers from airborne contaminants. The mode is powered by a medical-grade HEPA filter that "strips outside air of pollen, bacteria, viruses and pollution" that should, in theory, withstand a serious biohazard outbreak. Other safety features include an active sonar, radar and camera system which provides drivers with real-time feedback on their surroundings.

The Model X's technical specifications are pretty impressive as well. The SUV's floor-mounted 90 kWh battery ensures up to 250 miles of travel per charge, sports all-wheel drive, and the P90D model can hit 0-60mph in just 3.2 seconds with a top speed of 155 and 259 front-wheel and 503 rear-wheel horsepower.

Continue reading: Tesla's new $140K Model X is virus-proof, gets 250 miles per charge (full post)

Apple being deliberate about vehicle research, won't rush launch

Michael Hatamoto | Sep 8, 2015 10:35 AM CDT

Anytime Apple is reported to be involved in the development of a product, the rumor mill tends to go into overdrive. It looks like Apple's reported development of a car, which is expected to be semi-autonomous and electric, has created a large buzz.

"We believe the auto industry represents a significant opportunity for Apple, but we also expect Apple to be deliberate as always in its product development and testing," said Gene Munster, an analyst from Piper Jaffray, in a recent analyst note.

It was first predicted an Apple vehicle prototype around 2020, but despite Apple's recent hiring spree, trying to go from concept to real-world prototype in such a short time is rather unlikely. Instead, it could take at least a decade before Apple ends up with a drivable vehicle on the road:

Continue reading: Apple being deliberate about vehicle research, won't rush launch (full post)

Cyclist has a rather amusing encounter with a Google self-driving car

Michael Hatamoto | Aug 30, 2015 7:33 PM CDT

It looks like Google's autonomous vehicle is still learning every time it hits the open road, and a cyclist at a stop sign helped give it another learning opportunity. The cyclist was doing a track stand at the stop sign, and since the car arrived first, the autonomous vehicle had the right of way - but the vehicle just wasn't sure how to proceed with the cyclist present.

When the cyclist moved forward, the car inched forward and would stop so the cyclist would be able to go. The car noticed the cyclist's presence, but may have been overly cautious - which is something autonomous vehicles are designed for - so this will have to be considered just one more learning experience for Google developers. The cyclist's trackstand, since he wasn't actively moving forward or completely stopped, threw off the autonomous vehicle.

As an avid cyclist, hearing Oxtox's encounter is a rather perplexing one that Google will certainly try to sort out. There are an alarming number of incidents between vehicles and people on bikes, and the forum post noted: "The odd thing is that even tho (sic) it was a bit of a CF, I felt safer dealing with a self-driving car than a human-operated one."

Continue reading: Cyclist has a rather amusing encounter with a Google self-driving car (full post)

Driverless crash trucks could help keep construction crews safer

Michael Hatamoto | Aug 26, 2015 6:20 PM CDT

It seems like only a matter of time before autonomous trucks will hit US roadways, but it looks like there's a very specific purpose for the first to roll out: self-driving construction crash trucks, aimed to inform drivers about roadwork.

Using GPS waypoints, the autonomous workzone trucks are able to follow a lead car, mimic the lead vehicle's path, driving and braking patterns. The trucks are outfitted with rear-end crash barriers, lights, and large signs that update drivers to upcoming construction and road hazards.

"Any time a driver can be removed from these vehicles in a very dangerous situation, and if the vehicle's struck, there's nobody inside of it to receive the damage or the injuries, that's measuring success," said Robert Roy, president of Royal Truck & Equipment Inc, in a statement published by the Associated Press.

Continue reading: Driverless crash trucks could help keep construction crews safer (full post)

Uber kicks off bus-like 'Smart Routes' in San Francisco

Anthony Garreffa | Aug 26, 2015 1:30 AM CDT

Uber is now testing out bus-like "Smart Routes" throughout San Francisco, with the ridesharing giant offering discounts on rides if passengers don't mind being picked and dropped off along popular roads.

The new feature is for UberPool users, with Smart Routes showing up on Uber's app as green lines. UberPool users who want to use these new Smart Routes will have to walk to meet an UberPool driver that is driving along those specific routes, and will be offered $1 or more off of the cost of the journey.

Uber adds that these new Smart Routes are part of the company's "ongoing efforts to increase the efficiency of driver-partners' time spent on the road while helping riders save time and money". As for the drivers, they will be operating along these Smart Routes acting like a more personal, but smaller bus service. UberPool kicked off last year offering Uber customers the change of splitting costs by driving with strangers, but these discounts might it a very viable alternative to public transport.

Continue reading: Uber kicks off bus-like 'Smart Routes' in San Francisco (full post)

Survey: Drivers still want steering wheel, pedals in self-driving cars

Michael Hatamoto | Jul 27, 2015 5:49 PM CDT

Forty-four percent of drivers don't like the idea of self-driving vehicles as a personal vehicle, with 41 percent preferring a vehicle that allows for human takeover ability, and just 15 percent approve of a fully capable self-driving vehicle, according to a survey from the University of Michigan Transport Research Institute.

The survey revealed men and younger survey participants approve of self-driving vehicles on a larger scale, while women and older drives have major concerns. And it looks like drivers want a steering wheel and pedals, just in case they feel the need to take over.

"Self-driving vehicles are often discussed in regard to their potential safety, energy consumption and environmental benefits," said Brandon Schoettle, a co-author of the study, in a statement published by NBC News. "However, less attention has been paid to considering the actual level of automation, if any, that drivers desire in their vehicle."

Continue reading: Survey: Drivers still want steering wheel, pedals in self-driving cars (full post)

Jaguar borrows insane 'Sixth Sense' technology from NASA for its cars

Anthony Garreffa | Jun 20, 2015 8:46 PM CDT

It looks like Jaguar is reaching into the future with its latest adoption of technology, thanks to the kind folks at NASA of all places. The new addition is an accident prevention technology that monitors your condition to prevent accidents, something the various features are collectively called "Sixth Sense".

Jaguar borrows insane 'Sixth Sense' technology from NASA for its cars

One of which is "Mind Sense" which is derived from a NASA technology that enhances a pilot's concentration skills, where it tries to read your brain waves, using sensors found in the steering wheel. The on-board computer then attempts to assess whether you're alert enough to be behind the wheel, with the steering wheel capable of being programmed to vibrant, or the system issuing the driver a warning sound, in case you've started to fall asleep or begin daydreaming.

Jaguar is also looking to install various medical-grade sensors into the driver's seat, especially when it comes to their luxury sedan, the Jaguar XJ. These sensors will make sure that you're good to drive, so the car will dim the lighting or play some music if it detects that you might be stressed out. Future iterations of Jaguar vehicles will be capable of self-driving, where it will be capable of detecting if you're having a heart attack, or seizure and take control of the vehicle to prevent an accident (and I'd dare say, call an ambulance for you).

Continue reading: Jaguar borrows insane 'Sixth Sense' technology from NASA for its cars (full post)

Ford wants to support wearables, mobile tech in its vehicles

Michael Hatamoto | May 31, 2015 9:30 PM CDT

Ford CEO Mark Fields recently spoke regarding his desire to see the automaker support wearables, smartphones, and other connected tech in vehicles. Embracing technology helped the once-struggling automaker turn around a few years ago, and Ford wants to make sure it doesn't shy away from emerging technologies.

During a recent visit to Ford's new Palo Alto research center, Fields mentioned the "intersection between cars and wearables" that only seems to be accelerating:

" Yeah. Absolutely," Fields said during a recent interview with the San Jose Mercury News. "A lot of the research that we're doing down here is working with companies on wearables and sensors and things of that nature and what would that mean for cars. And is there is an experience on that that makes sense to integrate into our cars?"

Continue reading: Ford wants to support wearables, mobile tech in its vehicles (full post)