Science, Space, Health & Robotics News - Page 385

All the latest Science, Space, Health & Robotics news with plenty of coverage on space launches, discoveries, rockets & plenty more - Page 385.

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So, researchers made artificial HUMAN SKIN that covers a smartphone

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 20, 2019 10:29 PM CDT

In some news that should be categorized as "why the hell did they do this", researchers from Telecom Paris have made an artificial skin that has some truly unique properties. Check out this video:

So, researchers made artificial HUMAN SKIN that covers a smartphone

The new artificial human skin is interesting, as it reacts to stroking, pinching, tapping, and even tickling... with the researchers covering a smartphone with it and using it on the back of the device. They also used it on a smartwatch, and I'm sure it'll have a million-and-one use cases, but for now I'm just scratching my head.

Skin-On Interfaces are "sensitive skin-like input methods than can be added to existing devices to increase their capabilities" which is explained on this website. This project saw the researchers wanting to make the "perfect human interface that is the skin for existing devices". The researchers took inspiration from human skin in order to design the "perfect artificial skin".

Continue reading: So, researchers made artificial HUMAN SKIN that covers a smartphone (full post)

Mosquito repellents are an amazing 'invisibility cloaks' for humans

Jak Connor | Oct 18, 2019 5:07 AM CDT

Researchers out of the Johns Hopkins University have performed numerous experiments on mosquito's regarding their sense of smell and how repellents affect the insects.

Mosquito repellents are an amazing 'invisibility cloaks' for humans

According to the above video, Chris Potter, Associate Professor of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine discusses that him and his fellow scientists have been studying a specific type of mosquito called Anopheles. The scientists took Anopheles and genetically engineered them to produce a color on their nose when the neurons detect a sense of smell.

Once the scientists successfully genetically engineered the mosquito's they gathered to most common insect repellents and puffed the oder onto their noses. To the scientists surprises, the repellents didn't raise any color in the mosquito's noses, meaning that the insect repellents actually hide the natural 'human scent' that mosquito's would usually detect. This means that insect repellents act as an 'invisibility cloak' for humans.

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Rocket Lab has successful 9th rocket launch with next-gen satellite

Jak Connor | Oct 17, 2019 8:13 AM CDT

Rocket Labs can now add another successful rocket launch to its already eight launches the company has under its belt.

Rocket Lab has successful 9th rocket launch with next-gen satellite

The rocket launched from the LC-1 launch site in New Zealand and as the 'As The Crow Flies' mission took to the at precisely 9:22 PM ET (6:22 PM PT) well deserved celebrations were underway for the company. Rocket Labs now has nine successful Electron launches in total and eight for commercial customers. This launch in particular carried Astro Digitals next-generation geocommunications satellite called 'Palisade'.

According to Rocket Lab founder and CEO, Peter Beck who spoke to TechCrunch, "Electron is a launch on demand service - we're ready when the launch customer is". From this comment it seems that Beck is attempting to showcase how versatile the launch services are for his company and how well Rocket Labs can adapt to the needs of the consumer wanting to get something up into space.

Continue reading: Rocket Lab has successful 9th rocket launch with next-gen satellite (full post)

Virgin's commercial spaceflight tickets will rise above $250,000 each

Jak Connor | Oct 17, 2019 3:08 AM CDT

So you want to go to space? Well, you will have to save every penny you have got because commercial spaceflight company Virgin Galactic are raising their ticket prices.

Virgin's commercial spaceflight tickets will rise above $250,000 each

Back in 2004, more than 600 space tourists purchased tickets to go to space via Virgin's SpaceShipTwo for $200,000 each. In 2013, the company raised the ticket pricing to $250,000 and now according to Virgin Galactic CEO Georgo Whitesides, space tourists should expect another raise in ticket price before commercial launches expect to begin in 2020.

Due to the many delays of the tourist spaceflight, such as in 2014 Virgin's SpaceShipTwo Unity trial ending in a tragedy that killed one pilot and critically injured another. Virgin has had to continuously delay commercial spaceflights so much that purchasing tourists have been asking the company for refunds on their tickets. Whitesides says that "I think it's going to be a few years" before ticket prices reduce to the expected $60,000 each, but before that happens prices will actually increase due to the company believing they accidentally undervalued initial pricing.

Continue reading: Virgin's commercial spaceflight tickets will rise above $250,000 each (full post)

Under Armour unveils spacesuits for Virgin Galactic passengers

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 16, 2019 11:45 PM CDT

Under Armour has teamed with Virgin Galactic on some new space apparel, something that Virgin Galactic passengers will wear when they're throwing down $250,000 to fly into space.

Under Armour unveils spacesuits for Virgin Galactic passengers

The new spacesuit looks pretty slick, like it's ripped right out of Star Trek with a blend of Fallout 76 with Under Armour retrofitting the UA RUSH -- the mineral-infused fabric that it sells to athletes. Under Armour says that its new spacesuit will help regulate temperatures and sweat management, which is very important.

I'm digging the blue style that UA has gone with here, but an interesting fact is that the gold accents used on the suit are inspired by rays of sunlight. Under Armour adds that each iteration of the spacesuit went through heaps of testing, with UA getting pilots, spaceship engineers, medical professionals and astronaut instructors to test them out.

Continue reading: Under Armour unveils spacesuits for Virgin Galactic passengers (full post)

SpaceX files documents to launch 30,000 satellites into space

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 16, 2019 7:28 PM CDT

Elon Musk must never sleep -- I think that much is a given, with SpaceX filing the necessary paperwork with the International Telecommunications Union (which governs the international use of global bandwidth) for its Starlink initiative. Starlink is SpaceX's grand plans of launching the world's largest low-Earth-orbit broadband constellation.

SpaceX files documents to launch 30,000 satellites into space

SpaceX wants to send 30,000 satellites into orbit for its Starlink global broadband constellation, with the private space firm already approved to launch 12,000 satellites. SpaceX needs more because it wants to ensure great network speed and wants to meet demand "responsibly".

In a statement to TechCrunch, a SpaceX spokesperson explained: "As demand escalates for fast, reliable internet around the world, especially for those where connectivity is non-existent, too expensive or unreliable, SpaceX is taking steps to responsibly scale Starlink's total network capacity and data density to meet the growth in users' anticipated needs".

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NASA offers SpaceX $5 million to ensure employees don't smoke pot

Shannon Robb | Oct 16, 2019 2:20 PM CDT

Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, caused quite the fervor among viewers as he smoked from a joint on an episode of Joe Rogan's popular podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience.

NASA offers SpaceX $5 million to ensure employees don't smoke pot

If you would like to see the full 2hr podcast video, it can be found here. It gives a very interesting look at Elon Musk, the man behind Tesla and SpaceX.

Now with that understanding of the events prior. NASA took this as a warning sign and wanted to step in since SpaceX is a contractor for NASA projects such as the construction of space capsules. While California is one of many states that have passed laws allowing for recreational use of marijuana, the drug is still a controlled substance and illegal on the federal level.

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NASA reschedules first all-female spacewalk after battery failure

Jak Connor | Oct 16, 2019 2:03 AM CDT

NASA has debuted a new press release that details that some changes are coming to the spacewalk schedule that is going to happen aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

NASA reschedules first all-female spacewalk after battery failure

At 4:30pm today, NASA will be hosting a media conference that will be streamed on their website. Throughout this conference, Kenny Todd, manager of International Space Station Operations Integration, and Megan McArthur, deputy chief of NASA's Astronaut Office will be taking live questions about the recent changes that have been put in place regarding the spacewalk scheduling. For those out of the loop, NASA and the astronauts aboard the ISS are upgrading the space station's power system through replacing old batteries with new ones, more on that here.

The space station managers have decided to postpone three spacewalks that were previously planned to be executed this week and next week. Here's why, according to the press release "Space station managers have postponed three spacewalks previously scheduled for this and next week to install new batteries in order to first replace a faulty battery charge/discharge unit (BCDU)". The press release continues and says "The BCDU failed to activate following the Oct. 11 installation of new lithium-ion batteries on the space station's truss. The three spacewalks previously planned to continue the installation of additional lithium-ion batteries will be rescheduled."

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Sex robots with 'consent modules' being made for ethical sex robots

Anthony Garreffa | Oct 15, 2019 8:00 PM CDT

The world of sex robots is an interesting one where I've previously reported that sex robots with "coding errors" could strangle, and kill you in the act -- but now let's move into the design of "ethical" sex robots.

Sex robots with 'consent modules' being made for ethical sex robots

These ethical sex robots will have to provide their partner with consent before they have sex, with university researchers from Australia and the Netherlands seeing a future where "consent modules" will be used in sex robots. These consent modules would require the sex robot to give consent before sex.

Anco Peeters of Australia's University of Wollongong and Pim Haselager, an associate professor at The Netherlands' Radboud University recently published an article that talked about a future where "ethical" sex robots were a thing. The research article explains: "We propose that virtue ethics can be used to address ethical issues central to discussions about sex robots. In particular, we argue virtue ethics is well equipped to focus on the implications of sex robots for human moral character. Our evaluation develops in four steps".

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That reddish interstellar visitor isn't what we thought it would be

Jak Connor | Oct 15, 2019 3:07 AM CDT

Astronomers that have been observing the comet that arrived in our solar system from deep space, discovered that the comet is much more ordinary than first expected.

That reddish interstellar visitor isn't what we thought it would be

Sometimes space discoveries aren't all celebrations, as sometimes what was expected to be found is a bit more ordinary than originally thought. This is one of those times, as amateur astronomer, Gennady Borisov found back in late August a comet from deep space which was then named 2I/Borisov. This comet was the second interstellar object ever found to enter our solar system, and as astronomers studied its qualities it has been found to be quite the ordinary comet.

A team led by Piotr Guzik at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland maned the telescopes at the Canary Islands and Hawaii to observe the visitor further. What they found is that the comet has a reddish color with a fuzzy tail extending from its 2-kilometre-wide nucleus. The team found that the comet is more normal than once thought, and is extremely similar to the comets that are currently floating around our sun. Astronomers will continue to study 21/Borisov as its trajectory is will closely approach the sun on the 8th of December. After that it will continue outwards to the edges of our solar system.

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